Tag Archives: Willow Emerald

15th Sept 2020 – Early Autumn Private Tour, Day 2

Day 2 of a two day Early Autumn Private Tour in North Norfolk today. It was another lovely sunny day, a little bit hazier than yesterday with a slightly cooler light ENE breeze which kept the temperatures very comfortable in the low 20sC on the coast. Perfect weather to be out birding again.

We started the day at Titchwell. There was no sign first thing of the Glossy Ibis which had been here yesterday afternoon, but we decided to go anyway and get in before the car park filled up. When we arrived and got out of the minibus, a Goldcrest was feeding in a pine right above where we had parked.

There were next to no cars in the overflow car park yet, so we decided to have a quick walk round before it got busy. A flock of Long-tailed Tits came out of the trees by the entrance track and flew across in front of us. They had a couple of Chiffchaffs in tow too. We then watched them feeding in the brambles and elders in the back of the car park. along with a couple of Blackcaps.

Long-tailed Tit – we followed a flock into the overflow car park

We followed the flock round to the far side. There were a few finches in the car park too, but the Bullfinches feeding in the sallows in the far corner remained well hidden and hard to see. We were surprised to find a Moorhen clambering around high up in the bushes here too – an odd place for one. A couple of Jays flew up into the top of the tall willows behind. A Red Admiral butterfly feeding on the ivy looked very smart in the morning sunshine.

Red Admiral – enjoying the morning sunshine

We made our way round to the Visitor Centre, through the crowds of beachgoers and dog walkers who were rapidly filling up the car park, which is still partly closed. There had apparently been a Pied Flycatcher earlier by the Visitor Centre, so we had a quick look in the trees back to the picnic area, but there was no sign of it there.

Back past the visitor centre, a small flock of Siskins flew through the trees. We had a quick look in the alders by the main path, but they weren’t there. While we were looking, a small skein of around twenty Pink-footed Geese came overhead calling, possibly fresh arrivals from Iceland, coming here for the winter.

With it being so sunny, we decided to head round to Patsy’s Reedbed first and then have a look at the Freshmarsh from the end of Autumn Trail. As we walked up to the screen at Patsy’s, the first thing that caught our eye was a Great White Egret out in the middle, preening. It was striking how big it was, particularly when it stood with its neck stretched up, and we could see its long, dagger-like yellow bill.

Great White Egret – on Patsy’s Reedbed pool this morning

Another Great White Egret flew across over the reedbed further back. The one we were watching can’t have seen it – perhaps it heard something, because after the second bird landed in the reeds, the first took off and flew back towards it. It chased it up out of the reeds and we lost sight of the two of them behind the bushes.

Otherwise, there were a few ducks on the pool this morning, mainly Gadwall. Coot was an addition to the trip list here, and there were a couple of Little Grebes too. A young Marsh Harrier, dark chocolate brown with a paler head, quartered over the reed behind.

As we made our way round along East Trail and on to Autumn Trail, there were several Common Darters basking on the path which took off ahead of us. A very smart fresh Shaggy Inkcap toadstool was sticking up out of the short grass on the verge. There were a few squashed Bloody-nosed Beetles and a couple of live ones. We picked one up, which had lost a couple of legs, to move it off the path and it duly obliged by exuding the red liquid from its mouthparts from which it gets its name. A couple of Cetti’s Warblers shouted at us as we passed.

Shaggy Inkcap – growing in the grass by East Trail

We had spoken to someone earlier who had suggested that most of the waders were at the back of the Freshmarsh, but apart from quite a few Ruff in the top corner, there wasn’t much up this end now. Out in the middle, we could see a good number of Black-tailed Godwits and just a couple of lingering Avocets today. A smaller wader further back still looked like the Little Stint, but it was a long way away from this side. In the distance, the other side of the West Bank path, five Spoonbills flew up and circled round.

A couple of Bearded Tits were feeding on the mud at the base of the reeds, in front of the watchpoint at the end of the path. We had a nice view of them through the scopes, a cracking male with powder grey head and black moustache, and a browner female. Another small group of 5-6 were calling to each other in the reeds and we saw them fly up a couple of times before crashing back in.

As we turned to head back, we heard the group of Bearded Tits calling again and watched them land again in the reeds close to the path. We walked up towards where they had landed and noticed one Bearded Tit on its own in the reeds. The rest of the flock further ahead flew up and over the bank towards Brancaster Marsh, but the lone bird stayed put. It climbed up the reeds right in front of us, giving us a great view, calling for the rest of the group.

Bearded Tit – came up out of the reeds right in front of us

It was a male, with powder blue-grey head and black moustache, probably a young one as it was moulting and the head was not as well marked as some. The Bearded Tit flew up a couple of times but landed again. Eventually it seemed to work up the courage to cross the path, but simply landed again in a dead umbellifer on the bank right next to one of us! After flitting around there for a couple of seconds, it finally flew up and over the bank.

We made our way back and round via Meadow Trail. We stopped at the platform by the dragonfly pool to admire an apple green and bright blue Southern Hawker, which in typical style kept coming back to hover close to us. It was chased at a couple of times by a Migrant Hawker, and then it decided to chase it away over the tops of the sallows. A tandem pair of Willow Emerald damselflies were trying to perch in the reeds below the platform but struggled to find somewhere they could agree to settle.

Willow Emerald damselflies – this tandem pair were trying to settle in the reeds

Walking out on the west bank path, we could hear more Bearded Tits calling from the reeds. Thankfully, having had such amazing views of the male earlier, we didn’t need to linger to try to see them here. We stopped by the Reedbed Pool and a scan revealed a good number of Common Pochard up towards the back. A Kingfisher called from one of the channels in the reedbed, but didn’t come out.

Looking out across the saltmarsh the other side, we could see a line of white shapes asleep in the grass. Most were clearly Little Egrets, but the end one looked a little larger, a different shape, and more of a dirty yellowish colour. It was a Spoonbill, presumably one of the ones we had seen distantly over here earlier.

A paraglider was flying over Thornham Harbour and flushing everything. Several flocks of Curlew flew up and circled round nervously. A flock of Golden Plover came in over the path, most of them having lost their summer black bellies already. The Spoonbill woke up and flashed its bill, confirming our ID. A second Spoonbill flew in over the saltmarsh towards us, its black wingtips displaying its immaturity, before it turned and flew back the other way.

With the sun out, and nothing much on the drier mud in front of Island Hide, we decided to scan the Freshmarsh from the west bank path further along. As we walked up, we could hear a Spotted Redshank calling, but presumably it was flying off as we couldn’t see it out on the mud. One of the Great White Egrets was now standing on the edge of the small round island, preening.

There were lots of Black-tailed Godwits still out in the middle, and a selection of Ruff around the edges. Looking carefully through the godwits, we found a single Bar-tailed Godwit too – its smaller size, slightly shorter legs and more contrastingly-marked upperparts setting it apart, even before we could see its slightly upturned bill.

Ruff – a juvenile feeding on the Freshmarsh below the main path

There were one or two Dunlin scattered around the islands and edges and a larger group of seven at the far end, below the reeds. We couldn’t find the Little Stint at first, it wasn’t where we had seen it earlier, but scanning carefully we eventually found it on the muddy edge of the island over in front of the fence. It was feeding with its rear end up in the air a lot, which confirmed it was the bird we had seen distantly from the end of Autumn Trail earlier. Odd behaviour, but instantly recognisable as different. A single Common Snipe was feeding just inside the fence.

We wanted to spare our energy for the afternoon, so we decided not to walk on any further and headed back to the car park. There had been a Wryneck earlier seen at Holme, so we decided to have a go to see if we could find it. As we arrived at the pay hut, we were told it had been seen again about 15 minutes before, in the bushes just beyond.

We parked and got out, and the challenge quickly became clear – there was a constant stream of cars up and down the track and people up and down the coastal path the other side of the bushes. Amazing numbers of people for this time of year, albeit it was a beautiful day. We had a slow walk round the bushes, with no success, so stopped to have lunch back at the minibus, before having another go.

We figured it might be worth having a walk through the dunes – no one seemed sure whether there might have been a second Wryneck seen further up towards the Firs, and there are often migrants in here. But as we walked through the bushes, there were very few birds. We did see lots of Small Heath and several Small Copper butterflies.

It was only as we got much closer to the Firs that we started to see things. Several flocks of Curlew came in off the beach, presumably disturbed from where they were feeding, along with a smaller number of Black-tailed Godwits.

Then we came across a Stonechat in the bushes, a female, followed quickly by another two, one a male with a black throat. A rattling call alerted us to a couple of Lapland Buntings passing overhead, but they were high in the bright sky and hard to see as they disappeared off west.

One of the group had lingered further back to take some photographs, and when they walked up to us they thought they had just seen a Whinchat. They weren’t wrong – it had just appeared in the bushes behind us, presumably following the Stonechats. We had a nice view of it, before it flew back further into the dunes – a nice bonus here.

Whinchat – in the dunes with a small group of Stonechats

Everyone was feeling tired now, so the intrepid guide walked back to get the minibus and the others waited at the Firs. We had a quick look at the bushes by the payhut as we drove out, but there had been no further sign of the Wryneck. We decided to head back east to Burnham Overy.

We almost couldn’t get into the car park at Burnham Overy Staithe, but thankfully someone was leaving just as we arrived. We set out along the seawall. There was lots of disturbance in the harbour channel – boats, a paddleboard, swimmers – and we didn’t see many birds until we got to the arm of mud which extends alongside the bend in the seawall.

Scanning the mud, we could see lots of Common Redshanks. Several Turnstones were feeding in alongside the gulls, mostly Black-headed Gulls but with a couple of Common Gulls too. There were a few Dunlin too, and a couple of Grey Plover.

A small group of white shapes were down in the grass on the edge of the saltmarsh further up and through the scope we could confirm they were the Cattle Egrets we had come to look for, nine of them. We walked further up until we were directly opposite and had a nice view as they stood in the vegetation preening.

Cattle Egrets – nine were in the grass on the edge of the saltmarsh, preening

The tide was coming in fast now and starting to fill the arm of mud in front of us. The Redshanks were feeding more actively and the Cattle Egrets started to move. First one or two, then the rest of the flock flew down to the water. They seemed to be feeding on the tide out in the shallow water beyond the open mud, in amongst the Redshanks – unusual behaviour for Cattle Egrets but fascinating to watch. Presumably they had even been waiting out on the saltmarsh for the incoming tide.

Looking inland, the other side, a Red Kite was hanging in the air over the fields in the distance, getting harrassed by crows. A Grey Heron flew across and landed with the cattle out in the middle. A Mediterranean Gull flew in from the harbour and over the seawall, overhead, flashing its pure white wing tips.

It was a great view, looking out across the harbour in the late afternoon sunshine, or inland to the coast road and beyond. A great way to end our two days, watching the Cattle Egrets out in the harbour. It was time to head back.

28th Aug 2019 – Intro to UK Birding, Day 2

Day 2 of a two day Private Tour for a guest from Hong Kong, along the North Norfolk coast looking for a good selection of both our commoner breeding birds and any more interesting species we might come across. We were also trying to get photographs of as many of the birds as possible too. It was a cloudy start, even with a few early spits of drizzle first thing, but it brightened up through the morning and was warm and sunny again by the afternoon.

Our first destination for the day was Wells Woods – we hoped to have a quick look round before the car park got too busy, although with the cloudier weather it would not be as bad as it was over the bank holiday weekend. As we drove down the Beach Road, we noticed some partridges feeding on the mini railway track so we pulled up to look at them. They were Grey Partridges, a small family party, and we watched them for a few minutes as they fed on the short grass alongside the railway.

Grey Partridge

Grey Partridge – we stopped to watch a family party feeding by the mini railway

Having parked in the beach car park, we set off down the track into the woods. We stopped briefly by the boating lake where there were several Little Grebes out on the water, including an adult with a rather noisy juvenile begging to be fed over by the reeds. A lone Tufted Duck out in the middle was a rather dull eclipse drake with grey flanks.

As we walked into the birches, we could hear Jays calling, and we looked up to see one flying through the trees. There seemed to be a pair and we followed them for a few minutes, until a couple of dog walkers came through and they flew off into the woods. A Wren was singing in the bushes and proved more obliging.

We quickly found a flock of Long-tailed Tits, and stopping to look through them we found Coal, Blue and Great Tits with them. A Garden Warbler appeared in the flock too, in the top of a dense sallow, but stayed mostly well hidden in the leaves. We watched a Treecreeper climbing up the trunk of one of the trees. As the flock moved on towards the main path, out into the open, we had good views of a couple of Goldcrests too, before all the birds moved up into the top of the pines.

A little further on, we found another flock. As well as tits, there were a couple of Blackcaps and Chiffchaffs here. In the trees just beyond, we heard a Pied Flycatcher calling and saw it make a quick sally out of the dense sallows, but it disappeared straight back in and was lost to view. It seemed to calling from the back of the trees now, so we walked round to the other side.

The flock seemed to have moved on, and we thought the flycatcher had disappeared too. We had a look round, and scanned the trees, then suddenly the Pied Flycatcher appeared again on the front of the same sallow. It kept disappearing into the dense foliage, but came out into the open a couple of times, and perched nicely where we could see it. After following it for a while, we realised there was more than one and triangulating the calls there were actually at least three of them. Pied Flycatchers are just passage migrants here, passing through on their way from Scandinavia to Africa for the winter.

Pied Flycatcher

Pied Flycatcher – a migrant, stopping off on its way south from Scandinavia

When we got back to the car park, it was already filling up fast. We decided to move on, and drove west along the coast to Titchwell.  A flock of Long-tailed Tits made their way through the trees in the car park as we headed out onto the reserve. It was the Titchwell weekly ‘moth morning’, so we had a quick look at this morning’s haul from the moth traps, including an ever popular Poplar Hawkmoth at one end of the size scale, and a couple of tiny micro moths too.

We made our way out along Fen Trail first, stopping to listen to a Cetti’s Warbler shouting at us from the bushes behind Fen Hide. It remained very well hidden, deep in the undergrowth as they usually like to do.

There were plenty of ducks on Patsy’s Reedbed, several Tufted Ducks and Common Pochard, lots of Mallard and Gadwall and a single eclipse drake Wigeon, but no sign of the Garganey which had been reported there earlier. A Little Grebe was diving on the edge of the reeds right down in front of the screen.

Little Grebe

Little Grebe – diving down at the front of Patsy’s Reedbed

The Autumn Trail is open at this time of year, so we continued right round to the back of the Freshmarsh. The Spoonbills often like the back where the water is deeper, but today they were across the other side, asleep on one of the islands closer to the main path, three of them. We could hear Bearded Tits calling, but they remained hidden down in the reeds.

A young Water Rail appeared on the far side of the mud in front of the viewpoint. It was picking its way in and out of the reeds in typical fashion at first, but then started to walk across to the near side. It was rather nervous out in the middle on the open mud, started running, and then flew across into the reeds on our side out of view.

Water Rail

Water Rail – ran out across the open mud looking nervous

It was time for lunch now, and as we walked back towards the ‘tank road’, we looked up to see two Common Buzzards circling over in the sunshine. Back by the visitor centre, a Chaffinch was on the feeders and a Dunnock was looking for scraps below.

Common Buzzard

Common Buzzard – circled over as we walked back for lunch

We made good use of the picnic tables in the picnic area for lunch. Just a couple of years ago, Willow Emerald damselflies were unknown here but the pace of colonisation has accelerated and they now seem to be doing well. While we were eating, we saw several around the sallows here.

Willow Emerald

Willow Emerald damselfly – a recent colonist, expanding fast

Across yesterday and this morning, we had already heard several Robins calling or singing, but they can be remarkably elusive at this time of year. As we walked back from the minibus after lunch, we finally got a good look at one in the trees by the car park, singing.

We made our way out along the main path next, to explore the rest of the reserve. Another Cetti’s Warbler was singing in the bushes on the edge of the reedbed by the path, and this time we could just make it out in the leaves as it moved through the sallows. We stopped for a quick look at the reedbed pool, but there was no sign of the Great White Egret which had been on here earlier, just a couple of drake Common Pochard now.

Avocet

Avocet – feeding in front of Island Hide

There were lots of waders on the Freshmarsh so we went down into Island Hide to look through them. One Avocet was feeding right outside the hide, but there were lots more further out, over towards the back.

There were lots of Ruff and Lapwing on the mud too, but with the water level low at the moment they were mostly not so close today. One Lapwing was feeding on the drier mud right outside the hide, the iridescent plumage of its upperparts shining green, bronze and purple in the sunshine.

Lapwing

Lapwing – showing off its iridescent upperparts

A large flock of diminutive Dunlin was feeding busily in the water beyond the mud. Looking through them carefully, we found a single juvenile Curlew Sandpiper in with them, slightly larger, longer-billed, and cleaner white below than the spot-bellied juvenile Dunlin. Further back still, some large groups of Black-tailed and Bar-tailed Godwits were mostly asleep. In amongst them were a few Knot, with one adult still partly in breeding plumage, orange below.

A single Common Snipe was asleep in the vegetation on the mud over towards the reeds, and further back, three Common Sandpipers were feeding on a small pool along the edge of the reedbed. Even though they were distant, through the scope we could see the distinctive notch of white between the grey breast and wings.

There was still one Spoonbill left on the small island, where we had seen the three earlier, distantly from the end of the Autumn Trail before lunch. It did wake up from time to time and flash its yellow-tipped black bill, an adult.

Spoonbill

Spoonbill – there was still one left from Island Hide in the afternoon

Somebody in the far side of the hide spotted a Great White Egret flying across over the reedbed and the next thing we knew there were two in the air together. They chased each other round, then came straight towards us, their long trailing legs, long rounded wings and slow, heavy wingbeats different from the commoner Little Egrets, as well as their long yellow-orange bills. One Great White Egret even landed briefly on the mud in front of the hide, but quickly took off again and chased after the other. They eventually dropped down out of view in the reeds.

Great White Egret

Great White Egret – we watched two chasing round over the reeds

From up on the main path, with the water level low, we could see the mud was fairly dry and there was nothing in front of Parrinder Hide, so we continued straight out towards the beach. There were a few Common Redshanks on Volunteer Marsh, along with one or two Curlew. Two smart Grey Plover were rather distant, at the back of the channel at the far end, but we had a nice view of them in the scope, still in breeding plumage and sporting black faces and bellies.

The ‘Tidal’ Pools held more Common Redshanks and Curlew. Two (Ruddy) Turnstones flew in and landed on a small muddy island, where, in the absence of any stones, they started turning bits of dead vegetation over, looking for invertebrates underneath. A large mob of Oystercatchers was asleep on the big island, and several Ringed Plovers were out on the end of the spit nearby.

Out at the beach, the tide was coming in and had already covered the mussel beds, which is why the waders were all roosting on the pools. The sea looked fairly quiet, but we did pick out a few distant Sandwich Terns passing offshore, and three closer Common Terns, including one adult carrying a fish which glinted in the sunshine.

On the walk back past the Freshmarsh, we stopped to look through the gulls. There had been a report of a juvenile Caspian Gull here earlier, but all we could find now was an immature Lesser Black-backed Gull, a second calendar year, doing a passing impression of one. However, we did manage to dig out an immature Mediterranean Gull (again a second calendar year) in with all the Black-headed Gulls and an adult Yellow-legged Gull asleep on its own on one of the other islands.

On our way back east, we decided to take a roundabout route inland to try to add some more birds to the list. We were particularly hoping to find some raptors, and we quickly located two Common Buzzards and a juvenile Marsh Harrier in a stubble field. One of the Buzzards was feeding on something, the others waiting patiently to see if there would be anything left over.

Much of the journey subsequently was fairly quiet in the heat of the afternoon, but we eventually found a Kestrel, perched in the trees beside the road. We were almost back to Wells when we spotted a Red Kite over some trees. We had to find somewhere to pull in and a gap in the hedge, but then we stood and watched four Red Kites circling over a stubble field.

Red Kites

Red Kite – two of the four we found on our way back

It had been a very enjoyable two days out birding in Norfolk with over 100 species seen, and some good photo opportunities too, a great introduction to UK birds.

14th Sept 2018 – Early Autumn, Day 1

Day 1 of a three day Early Autumn Tour today. It was a nice bright and sunny start, and although it clouded over a bit in the afternoon it stayed dry all day. With reports of a couple of interesting birds down in East Norfolk yesterday, and a few more migrants around there, we headed down to the Broads.

As we drove down towards Winterton, which was to be our first destination for the day, we scanned the fields for any sign of Cranes, but we couldn’t see any this morning. They are not so easy to find at this time of year.

When we got to Winterton, we headed straight off into the South Dunes. As we got to the first trees, we could see Blue Tits in the sycamores, but there didn’t appear to be anything else with them. Just beyond, some movement in the dense brambles on the slope turned out to be a Lesser Whitethroat, once it came out enough for us to see it. Probably a migrant, stopped here to feed on its journey south.

A little further along, there was lots of activity in the bushes. A big flock of House Sparrows was chattering away in the white flowers of old man’s beard. A Chiffchaff flew out and darted into the brambles and then a Common Whitethroat appeared there too. Another bird flew up and perched on the top of the bushes next to the sparrows – a Whinchat. It flew again, into some thick elders, where it thought we couldn’t see it. But from the right angle, we could get a clear look at it in the scope.

Whinchat

Whinchat – perched in the elders, thinking we couldn’t see it

The trees just beyond held more Blue Tits and a Blackcap. Another Chiffchaff showed nicely in a birch tree, fluttering around in the leaves looking for insects. Another bird flew out and landed in the trees higher up the slope. A Redstart – another migrant breaking its journey here. It was quite hard to see, perched motionless in the leaves, until it flew again, darting across the path and disappearing round the back of some oaks the other side.

We walked round to the other side of the trees, but there was no further sign of the Redstart. However, we could see two crows feeding on the grassy slope of the dunes across the valley. They were noticeably grey around the nape and through the scope we could see they were Hooded Crow hybrids. One had more grey on it than the other, but neither had enough, in the right places to be a pure Hooded Crow. They intergrade fairly commonly with Carrion Crows, which was clearly the case with these two. Interesting birds to see anyway.

Hooded Crow hybrids

Hooded Crow hybrids – feeding in the dunes

As we carried on south, there were several more warblers in the bushes – it was nice to see a few migrants here, despite the SW winds. A small flock of Meadow Pipits flew over calling, possibly on their way south.

There had been a Barred Warbler here yesterday, but when we got to the bushes where it was last seen we found several people looking, but no sign of the bird. Our second Lesser Whitethroat of the morning showed nicely on the outside of the hawthorns, eating blackberries, and while we were watching it a Sparrowhawk circled up over the houses at the top of the ridge. Another Chiffchaff was flitting about in the bushes too.

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff – feeding up, in the birches

When we heard Swallows alarm calling, we looked up to see a flock flying over followed a few seconds later by a Hobby. It was a lovely clear view as it flew past at eye level, before climbing up and disappearing over the ridge. As it banked, we could see its orange-red trousers.

There were quite a few butterflies out in the sunshine this morning, mostly various whites. On the walk back, a Grayling basked on the brambles, angling itself to catch the sun and a Small Copper landed nearby, down in the grass.

Grayling

Grayling – basking in the brambles

A Reeve’s Muntjac was feeding in the bushes half way up the slope. It stopped eating, stared at us for a minute or so, and then resumed its lunch. It seemed completely unconcerned by us passing close by.

Muntjac

Reeve’s Muntjac – stood and stared at us

As we got back to the road, it had clouded over and it felt like the wind had picked up a little, although we had been sheltered from it in the valley. We still had some time before lunch, so we decided to continue on into the North Dunes, to see if we could find a Wheatear. However, as we walked through the dunes, we were surprised to find almost no birds at all, not even a Meadow Pipit or a Linnet!

We got as far as the ‘east pond’, but it was cool and breezy here now and there were no signs of any Willow Emerald around the single small sallow. These damselflies are only very recent colonists in the UK and this can be a good place to see them. Up at the top of the dunes just beyond, we had a great panoramic view, but once again there was a surprising lack of  birds. We decided to head back.

On our way back past the ‘east pond’, we at least had a brief view of two Willow Emerald damselflies around the sallow, although they quickly disappeared back in. There were several Common Darters which were more obliging, one or two Migrant Hawkers buzzing round, and a single Blue-tailed Damselfly down in the rushes in the edge of the water.

When we got back to the car park, it was time for lunch. As we ate, looking out to sea next to the boat sheds, a damselfly flew in and landed right at our feet. It was a Willow Emerald! It narrowly avoided being trodden on and flew up to bask on one of the sheds where we had a much better view of it than the two we had seen briefly earlier.

Willow Emerald

Willow Emerald – basked briefly on one of the boat sheds

There were a few Mediterranean Gulls moving offshore, flying north along the coast. Two landed on the sea, an adult with bright red bill, black bandit mask and clean white wing tips, and a more subtle first winter.

After lunch, we headed inland to Potter Heigham to look for wildfowl and any waders. There were lots of Greylags out on the grazing meadows as we made our way in, accompanied by a pair of Egyptian Geese.

From up on the bank, we could scan the pools and we immediately spotted several Ruff out on the mud and a good number of Common Snipe around the edges of the reeds. Two Common Sandpipers were working their way round different parts of the shore. A flock of Golden Plover flew up and circled round calling and another group of smaller waders flew in and landed on the mud in the middle – nine Ringed Plover accompanied by a single Dunlin.

Golden Plover

Golden Plover – flying round over the pools

There were plenty of ducks here too, though the majority of the drakes are currently in their dull eclipse plumage, so they are not looking their best. Still, we could see a nice selection of Gadwall, Teal, Shoveler and Wigeon.

As we continued round on the bank, we could see a Marsh Harrier quartering the back of the grazing marshes in the distance, the other side of the channel. Their high pitched yelping calls alerted us to a flock of Pink-footed Geese high overhead. Flocks of these geese have been seen along the coast, returning from Iceland for the winter, in the last few days. These might well have just been returning here too, as this area is a regular roost site for Pink-footed Geese in the winter.

Pink-footed Geese

Pink-footed Geese – likely fresh arrivals just back from Iceland

When we got to the river bank over the far side of the pools, we looked back to see a Hobby over hanging in the air over the grazing marshes the other side. It kept swooping down behind the trees before flying up again, presumably catching dragonflies low over the wet grass.

The pools over on this side have dried out a lot over the summer, but there are still some nice areas of water. When we heard a Greenshank calling, we looked across to find one asleep in some small tufts of grass on the edge of the mud. Three Green Sandpipers were feeding in one of the pools, along with a Ruff.

Otherwise, there were also more geese and ducks on this side, including a smart drake Wigeon back in breeding plumage already. A large group of Cormorants were sleeping on one of the islands.

The cloud had thickened progressively through the afternoon and the sky was now rather grey. We decided to walk back. On the way, we found two more Green Sandpipers on one of the other pools. A smart grey-winged male Marsh Harrier was quartering over the drier areas of the marshes.

With a long journey ahead of us, we decided to head for home. More again tomorrow…

22nd Aug 2017 – Late Summer Birding

A Private Tour today for a visitor from India, so we went out looking for all the commoner species, as well as some of the more unusual ones. It was bright in the morning, even sunny at times, before clouding over a bit more in the afternoon, but thankfully it stayed dry all day.

The plan was to spend part of the day at Titchwell, but on our way there we turned inland to look for some farmland species first. We stopped at the start of a footpath, lined with overgrown hedges and brambles. As we got out of the car, we flushed a covey of Red-legged Partridges from the edge of the field. A Common Buzzard was calling and we looked over the fields to see one circling up out of the trees in the distance.

As we walked along the footpath, we could hear a Common Whitethroat and it flicked away ahead of us a couple of times before diving back into cover. A Yellowhammer was perched in the top of the hedge, but silhouetted against the sky and it dropped down out of view as we approached. Thankfully when we returned to the car, a smart yellow-headed male Yellowhammer had appeared in the top of the hedge right by the road. A Reed Bunting sat up nicely here for us too.

A little further along the road, a Eurasian Curlew flew past us as we drove along. We were just talking about how you can find large flocks feeding in the fields here when we passed the next hedge and found about twenty Curlew in a stubble field. Some smaller birds were running around just beyond them, very hard to see at first in the tall stubble. We stopped and wound down the windows for a better look and confirmed they were Eurasian Golden Plover. Some were still sporting the remains to their black summer underparts, to a greater or lesser extent.

Golden PloversGolden Plovers – very well camouflaged in the stubble

Carrying on towards Choseley, another Common Buzzard took off from a telegraph post by the road and glided away effortlessly ahead of us, while we stopped to look through a large flock of Black-headed Gulls and Herring Gulls. There were several (Northern) Lapwing in the field too. A little further on and  a family of Grey Partridge hopped out of the grassy verge and ran along the road ahead of us. Despite being only half grown, the youngsters had no problem flying over the hedge eventually.

A weedy strip along the edge of a field held a nice flock of finches, which flew up and landed on the wires so we could look through them. They were mostly Linnets, lots of brown, streaky females and juveniles, but with a few males still sporting their red breasts from the summer. There were several Goldfinches and a couple of Greenfinches with them too. Up at the drying barns there was quite a bit of disturbance – tractors, combine harvester and birdwatchers! – so we didn’t linger here and made our way on, down to Titchwell. Approaching the reserve, a few Common Swifts were hawking for insects over the fields beside the road.

As we got out of the car, we could hear Long-tailed Tits calling in the trees by the car park. We walked over for a closer look and found a mixed flock, with Blue Tits and Great Tits and a couple of Chiffchaffs in with them too. The first cars were starting to use the overflow car park, so it was not as quiet as it might have been, but we did still manage to see a couple of Blackcaps as they flew out of the brambles where they had been feeding. The Wood Pigeons were showing well around the car park as usual and were duly admired today – they are much harder to see in India apparently! A Great Spotted Woodpecker flew over calling.

Long-tailed TitLong-tailed Tit – a mixed flock was feeding in the car park

The feeders by the visitor centre produced a few more common birds for the day’s list – a male Chaffinch hopped around under the bird table and a pair of Dunnocks few under the feeders. The resident Robins here were unusually reticent to come and perform today, although we did see one in the trees (they are usually hopping around under the picnic tables!). A Grey Squirrel on the feeders the other side of the visitor centre was also a source of interest.

As we walked out onto the reserve, a Wall butterfly was basking in the sunshine on one of the signs on the sea wall. We heard a Bearded Reedling (aka Bearded Tit!) calling from the reeds by the Thornham grazing marsh ‘pool’, but despite waiting here for a couple of minutes, it didn’t show itself. A Marsh Harrier flapped up out of the reeds at the back before dropping back down and a Little Egret flew up from the other side of the reeds at the front and disappeared over the path behind us.

WallWall – basking on one of the signs on the sea wall

Other than a couple of Little Grebes, there were just a few Mallard on the reedbed pool, so we continued on towards Island Hide. Just before we got there, we stopped to listen to more Bearded Reedlings calling. Unfortunately one flew up out of the reeds just as we were looking in different directions and dropped in again too quickly for us both to get to see it. We decided we might have a better chance of seeing one on the edge of the reeds from the hide, so we continued on to there.

A few Common Teal were feeding on the mud right in front of the hide. Numbers are gradually increasing now, as they return here for the winter. Ducks in general are not looking their best at the moment, with all the drakes in drab eclipse plumage. The adult Shelduck have all left the UK and gone over to the Wadden See to moult, leaving behind all the duller juveniles, one of which was also dabbling in the mud by the hide.

ShelduckShelduck – a juvenile feeding on the mud in front of the hide

There were a few waders close to the hide too. At first, there were several Ruff here, the males already in winter plumage, having quickly lost their breeding plumage on their return. A Lapwing was a little further back on the edge of the mud too. We stopped a while to get some photographs of the various birds here.

RuffRuff – a winter plumage male in front of the hide

There are usually a few Avocets in front of the hide here and this is generally a good place to get photographs of them. At first today they were all much further over, but eventually our patience was rewarded when one came in and started feeding right in front of us, sweeping its bill from side to side across the surface of the wet mud.

AvocetAvocet – one eventually performed for us in front of the hide

There were other waders here, further out on the freshmarsh. Through the scope, we could see a good number of Black-tailed Godwits. A little group of Dunlin were feeding on the exposed mud along the edge of the reedbed, mostly streaky-bellied juveniles but a single adult was still sporting a solid black belly patch.

Four Spoonbills over the back of the freshmarsh were all asleep, but we eventually found a Bearded Reedling on the edge of the reeds, working its way along just above the mud, weaving in and out. We had a good view of it in the scope.

After our very productive photography session in Island Hide, we made our way round to Parrinder Hide next. We quickly located the two Common Snipe which we had been told were feeding by the fence on the edge of Avocet Island. A couple of the Spoonbills had woken up now, so we got a look at them through the scope before they went back to sleep.

A Meadow Pipit dropped in to bathe on the edge of the water just along from the hide. A careful scan through the Pied Wagtails feeding out on the islands produced a couple of Yellow Wagtails in with them.

The Volunteer Marsh looked quiet at first, but as we walked out towards the beach, we could see quite a few waders feeding along the banks of the channel at the far end. There were several Common Redshanks and Black-tailed Godwits and half hidden down in the channel we managed to find a single Grey Plover, well camouflaged with its back to us against a background of grey mud. It was still mostly in summer plumage and, when it turned, we could see its black face.

Out at the beach, the tide was out. We walked down to the mussel beds to look through the waders. As well as lots of very noisy Oystercatchers, we could see quite a few Bar-tailed Godwits, with a couple of them still in bright rusty summer plumage. There were several Curlews and (Ruddy) Turnstones too. A juvenile Spoonbill out here on the mussel beds looked distinctly out of place!

Scanning along the beach, we found a couple of Sanderling running around on the sand in amongst the gulls, which included a few Great Black-backed Gulls for the day. In the distance, a line of (Great) Cormorants were drying their wings out at Thornham Point. A lone Fulmar circled overhead on stiff wings and made its way west along the shoreline, before a couple of distant Sandwich Terns flew past offshore and two adult Gannets flew back the other way a little bit closer in.

TurnstoneTurnstone – feeding along the high tide line

At the top of the beach, we stopped to watch a couple of Turnstones feeding along the high tide line. They were not turning stones today, but pulling and shaking at the dry seaweed to try to dislodge any invertebrates. A Whimbrel called from somewhere out to sea, but then went quiet.

We stopped briefly to talk to a couple of local birders scanning the sea and they kindly pointed us in the direction of a Common Scoter out on the water. It drifted across and was joined by a second. A couple of Great Crested Grebes were out on the sea too.

Black-tailed GodwitBlack-tailed Godwit – a bright juvenile of the islandica subspecies

It was time for lunch now so we made our way quickly back. As we got to the freshmarsh, we could hear a Greenshank calling but didn’t see where it landed. A couple of juvenile Black-tailed Godwits were more obliging, feeding just below us along the edge of the reeds. Their bright rusty plumage confirmed they were of the islandica subspecies, which means they had just been born and raised in Iceland over the summer.

The Spoonbills commute in and out from the saltmarsh to feed and which we were walking back a couple of them flew back in, straight past us standing on the bank, giving us much closer views.

SpoonbillSpoonbill – flying back in from feeding out on the saltmarsh

On the walk back, a Cetti’s Warbler sang from the reeds briefly as we walked back but remained typically well hidden down in the vegetation. We heard a Common Sandpiper calling from the reedbed pool, but it remained out of sight, probably feeding around the muddy edges behind the reeds.

Then it was back for lunch in the picnic area, where one of the local Robins was a little more obliging than earlier in the day. A couple of Migrant Hawker dragonflies were hawking around the willows here too and a single Common Darter stopped to bask on one of the benches.

After lunch, a couple of Bullfinch were calling in the trees by the car park but went quiet before we got a chance to track them down. A quick visit to use the facilities revealed a nice selection of moths and other insects on the walls in the toilet block. They are attracted by the lights which are left on here overnight. A quick look at the moths revealed a Light Emerald, a Snout and a couple of Brimstone, accompanied by a Speckled Bush-cricket!

Light EmeraldLight Emerald moth – on the wall in the toilet block

For the first part of the afternoon, we wanted to explore the rest of Titchwell, Fen Trail and round to the Autumn Trail which is open at this time of year. A Jay was in the sallows along Fen Trail, hopping around above our heads, but otherwise the trees were rather quiet.

The surprise find along here was a Willow Emerald damselfly (also known as Western Willow Spreadwing) which was perched on the vegetation by the path. This species is a very recent colonist in the UK, from about 2007 in Norfolk, and has only started to occur in North Norfolk with any regularity in the last few years. Apparently there are still only a very few records from Titchwell!

Willow EmeraldWillow Emerald damselfly – still a rare species at Titchwell

The water levels on Patsy’s Reedbed are high now, so there were quite a few ducks out on the pool. They were mostly Gadwall and Mallard, but we also managed to find a single Tufted Duck and a couple of Common Pochard to add to the day’s tally. A careful scan around the edge of the reeds produced a Reed Warbler feeding low down at the water’s edge, before it or another flew up and started flycatching in the sallows in front of the viewing screen.

Stopping to look at a flock of finches in the dead trees by the paddocks, we noticed a couple of smaller birds chasing each other in and out of the hedge, two Lesser Whitethroats. Eventually they gave up chasing each other and one flew in and landed in the hedge much closer to us, before feeding on the blackberries, where we could get a good look at it.

Round at the end of Autumn Trail, we stopped to look out over the back of the freshmarsh. A single winter plumage Spotted Redshank was asleep over towards the Avocet Island fence, but there was no sign now of the Greenshank which had apparently been here earlier.

A careful scan along the edge of the reeds revealed a Water Rail picking its way across the mud, in and out of the vegetation. There were a couple of volunteers here who had just finished erecting some fence posts nearby and the Water Rail disappeared back into the reeds when they came over to try to see it. As soon as they left, it walked out into a gap in the reeds and stood preening for several minutes, so we could get a good look at it in the scope. Typical!

As we walked up to here, we had heard the distinctive ‘pinging’ call of Bearded Reedlings and we had had a quick glimpse of one as it flew up from the edge of the cut reed. When we heard more pinging calls just across the mud in front of us, we up to see two juvenile Bearded Reedlings perched in the top of the reeds just above the Water Rail. We didn’t know where to look! We had a great view of them through the scope.

Bearded TitBearded Reedling / Tit – perched up nicely in the reeds at the end of Autumn Trail

As we started to walk back, many of the Black-headed Gulls which had earlier been loafing on the freshmarsh were now hawking for insects, probably flying ants, over the reedbed. A smaller, dark shape dropped sharply out of the throng, a Hobby. It set off briefly after a Starling which was flying below, before giving up and flying back up into the mass of gulls where it also appeared to be catching insects.

We had planned to spend the rest of the afternoon at Holkham, so we made our way back to the car and headed back east along the coast road. When we got to Lady Anne’s Drive we discovered that it was closed. ‘For operational reasons’ was the only explanation we could get from the parking attendant at the gate, despite the fact that there were still plenty of cars parked along the drive and the horse box and taxi in front of us were allowed in. They seem to be making an annoying habit of closing Lady Anne’s Drive at the moment!

A quick change of plan, and we made our way over to Wells beach car park instead,  in the hope of picking up some woodland birds in the pines. As we had hoped, at this time of day the car parks were already emptying and there were plenty of spaces. We walked in through the gates and past the boating lake, along the main path on the edge of the trees. It was fairly quiet at first here. The highlight was a juvenile Marsh Harrier hunting out over Quarles marsh. It was wearing a couple of bright green wing tags but was unfortunately too far off to read the codes.

We headed for the drinking pool in the hope we might be able to intersect with a tit flock and were almost there when we ran into a large flock of birds coming in the opposite direction. We heard the Long-tailed Tits coming first and quickly found ourselves surrounded by birds. There were lots of Coal Tits in the tops of the pines, so we got a good look at those first. There were good numbers of Blue Tits and Great Tits with them too.

When we heard a Treecreeper calling, we looked across to see one climbing up the trunk of a tree. It disappeared back onto another tree, before reappearing chased by a second Treecreeper and the two of them followed each other up another trunk. Then a Great Spotted Woodpecker appeared in the top of the pines above them. As the tit flock moved on back through the trees alongside the path, we followed them. As they crossed the path, we found a few Goldcrests in the flock too and with patience we got good views of them lower down in the trees.

When the flock moved further into the trees, we left them to it and walked on to the drinking pool. Perhaps not surprisingly, with all the birds heading in the opposite direction, it was quiet here now, so we went back and quickly picked up the tit flock again. It seemed to be heading out into a more open area now, so we followed. Some of the birds flew out into the scattered bushes in the open, while others were reluctant to follow, remaining in the birches. The flock seemed to stop here for a few minutes, unsure which way it was going, which gave us another chance to look through it.

A small lemon-yellow breasted bird appeared in the top of the birches with the tits, a juvenile Willow Warbler, perhaps bred locally or possibly a migrant on its way south already. Unfortunately, it was very hard to get onto in the birches, flitting around constantly and only showing itself briefly a few times. As the flock finally made up its collective mind and then turned to head back into the trees, we picked up three Blackcaps which flew out of the bushes behind the rest of the birds.

It was time to make our way back to the car now, but at least our mission here had been successful in adding some woodland birds to the list. A Jay flew out and hopped around on the path in front of us on the way,

JayJay – flew out onto the path on our walk back

It had been a very successful day with an excellent variety of birds seen, and several different butterflies, moths and dragonflies too. A great introduction to birding in the UK!

 

 

8th Sept 2016 – Early Autumn Birding, Day 2

Day 2 of a three day Private Tour. With more autumn migrants seen in East Norfolk yesterday, we decided to head over that way today to see what we could catch up with. It was a glorious warm, sunny day – great weather to be out birding.

Winterton Dunes was our first port of call. There had been a Red-backed Shrike seen here yesterday and we were keen to try to catch up with it. There was no news as we drove down but thankfully as we started walking north through the dunes, a message came through to say that it was still present.

6o0a0520Small Heath – there were lots of butterflies out in the dunes

There was plenty to see as we walked along. In the sunshine, there were lots of butterflies out, as well as the regular species we saw a good number of Small Heath and Grayling. The dragonflies were also enjoying the weather, with loads of Common Darters and a few Migrant Hawkers too. A Whinchat appeared in the top of a bush in the dunes as we passed.

6o0a0517Grayling – also plentiful in the dunes today

We eventually got to the area where the Red-backed Shrike had been. As we walked up along the path, there was no immediate sign of it, but when we turned to walk back we found that it had reappeared behind us in the bushes right by the path! We were looking into the sun, so when it disappeared again back into the bushes, we tried to work our way back round the other side, but it had moved again.

At least we knew where the Red-backed Shrike was now and it didn’t take us long to find the bush it was favouring. Positioning ourselves, we were then treated to some stunning views as it perched on a branch. It kept dropping down to the ground below and flying back up. A couple of times we saw it return with prey – first a moth, then a beetle. Fantastic stuff!

img_6415Red-backed Shrike – we had great views of this juvenile in the dunes

When the Red-backed Shrike caught the beetle, it flew back to a clump of brambles just beyond. We were watching it perched on the top when it suddenly dropped down into cover. A couple of seconds later, we saw why. A Hobby was flying low over the ground, straight towards the bush and straight towards us! At the last minute, it saw us standing there and veered away to our left. What a cracking view!

Having enjoyed such good views of the shrike, we turned to make our way back. There were now two Hobbys hawking for insects over the trees, calling. A Marsh Harrier circled up too, and a couple of Common Buzzards. We walked over across the dunes to have a quick look at the sea, which produced a distant juvenile Gannet flying past and a few Cormorants.

On the walk back, we found a couple more Whinchats, on the fence around one of the natterjack pools. We came across a couple of pairs of Stonechats too. There was a steady stream of Swallows passing through over the dunes, on their way south.

When we got to the road, rather than head back to the car park, we crossed over and continued on into the South Dunes. At the first trees we came to, we could hear a Willow Warbler calling. It was very agitated at first, because there was a Sparrowhawk in the same sallow, although it flew off when we arrived. We watched as it flitted through to a nearby holly tree.

6o0a0527Willow Warbler – calling in the trees

It was getting rather hot now, particularly as we were more sheltered here from the cooling breeze. It felt like we might need a bit of luck to find some migrants, but we persevered. A small bird flew along the edge of the path in front of us and landed in the bushes, pumping its tail. A Redstart, a nice migrant to find, we had a good look at it in the scope.

img_6432Redstart – flew along the edge of the path ahead of us

We walked on a little further but, apart from a couple of Chiffchaffs, it seemed pretty quiet. As we turned back, we decided to walk through the trees in the middle of the valley and as we turned a corner, a Pied Flycatcher flicked across into a small tree in front of us. Unfortunately, it didn’t stop long and dropped quickly out the back out of view. As we walked further along, it flew again, into a larger group of oak trees.

When we got up to the oaks, there was no sign of the Pied Flycatcher, but as we walked through the trees a Spotted Flycatcher appeared instead. This was much more obliging – after flitting around deep in the tree at first, it came out onto a branch right in front of us, giving us stunning views. That rounded off an excellent selection of migrants in the Dunes.

img_6499Spotted Flycatcher – another migrant in the dunes

After lunch back at the car park, we headed over to Strumpshaw Fen for the afternoon. The lone Black Swan was on the pool by the Reception Hide as usual. Otherwise, there were lots of Gadwall and Mallard on here and a single Grey Heron. In the heat of the afternoon, the trees were quiet, so we made our way straight round to Tower Hide.

We had been told the hide was really busy today, but when we got there we had it to ourselves. It didn’t take long to find the Glossy Ibis, which has been here for over two weeks now. It looked thoroughly at home, wading around in the water with its head down, feeding. The light was perfect, really showing off the iridescent green gloss on its wings.

img_6530Glossy Ibis – looking very glossy indeed in the afternoon sunlight

There were lots of geese and ducks out on the water, or sleeping around the margins. The mob of Greylag Geese included a couple of white ‘farmyard’ geese. The ducks were predominantly Teal, Shoveler and Mallard. We had a careful scan through them at first for a Garganey, but it was only when a noisy Grey Heron flew over and flushed all the sleeping ducks out of the reeds and onto the water that we found one. The Garganey then showed really well and we got a great look at its boldly marked face pattern.

img_6541Garganey – showed really well once flushed out by a passing Grey Heron

There was a nice selection of waders here too. A limping Ruff was hobbling about on the mud right in front of the hide, but several more able bodied birds were feeding over towards the back. Nearby, we found three Common Snipe out on the open mud and with them a single Green Sandpiper. Then a Water Rail appeared out on the open mud too, which was really good to see.

The hide had filled up now, so having seen all we wanted to, we were just about to leave when someone asked us if the small birds on the mud next to the Snipe were Bearded Tits. We put the scope down again and sure enough they were – two juvenile Bearded Tits feeding out on the edge of the reeds.

A quick look in Fen Hide didn’t produce many birds of note, but we did see a Chinese Water Deer which walked out of the reeds onto one of the cut areas. On the walk back, we did see lots more butterflies and dragonflies. The highlight was a late second brood Swallowtail which flew over the path and landed on a branch above our heads briefly, before disappearing back towards the reedbed. As well as the regular dragonflies, we also came across several Willow Emerald Damselflies. These are now regular feature here at this time of year, although a very recent colonist having first been seen in this country only as recently as 2007.

6o0a0611Willow Emerald – we saw several of these damselflies at Strumpshaw today

Then it was back to the Reception Hide for a well deserved cold drink and an ice cream before heading for home.