Tag Archives: The Broads

15th June 2019 – Birds & Butterflies, Day 1

Day 1 of a weekend of Summer Tours looking for birds, butterflies and other wildlife. It was bright and sunny, with patchy high cloud for most of the morning, but cloudier and cooler as the breeze picked up a little in the afternoon. We made our way down to The Broads for the day.

As we set off, we hadn’t gone far when we spotted a Little Owl in the window opening of an old barn. We pulled up a discrete distance away but before we could get out it had disappeared inside. The rest of the journey down to the Broads was fairly quiet, the only bird of real note being a Grey Wagtail which flew up from the side of the road at one point.

Early reports suggested that the Lesser Grey Shrike which has spent the last week along the Nelson Head track at Horsey was still present this morning, so we headed straight round there first. A Swallow was singing from under the eaves of the Nelson Head pub.

Swallow

Swallow – singing under the eaves of the pub

As we walked down the road, a Common Whitethroat was singing from an oak tree in the hedge on the edge of one of the fields. There were small flocks of Linnets flying in and out of another oilseed rape field, feeding on the seeds. We took the track out towards the dunes and several Skylarks towered up into the blue sky, probably making the most of it after the last week’s rain. A Reed Warbler sang from a reedy ditch by the path, but remained mostly out of view, even though we could see the reeds moving. A male Reed Bunting perched on some brambles was singing too, as best it could!

There were a few people gathered already this morning, looking at the Lesser Grey Shrike, so we joined them. The bird was out at the back of a grassy meadow with scattered bushes. It was perched on a branch low on the edge of a clump of sallows at first, so we got it in the scope. We could see its black mask extending up over its forehead and the pink flush to its breast. It was very active, flying between bushes and sallying out over the grass for insects.

Lesser Grey Shrike

Lesser Grey Shrike – feeding from the bushes out in the meadow

Lesser Grey Shrike is a scarce visitor to the UK from south-eastern Europe, with on average only 1-2 seen each year. We stood and watched it for a few minutes, before it flew round behind a large area of bushes and we lost sight of it. A Hobby shot through low over the grass, hunting dragonflies. We decided to walk on to the dunes.

There has been an invasion of Painted Lady butterflies from the continent in the last few days and there were lots here this morning. Everywhere we looked over the grassy meadows, we could see them flying round. Along the edge of the path, there were small groups feeding on any nectar-bearing flowers that were open. An impressive sight to see so many here.

Painted Lady

Painted Lady – there has been an invasion from the continent

Further along the path, the verges were lined with several clumps of purple Southern Marsh Orchids coming into flower. A Curlew flew high overhead calling, heading south. Amazing to think, but the first waders are already coming back after the breeding season further north and there have been a few Curlews on the move in recent days. Their summer is over already, just as ours is hopefully beginning!

We carried on out to the dunes and climbed up to the top to look at the sea. There were a few gulls offshore and a Grey Seal diving just off the groynes. We had a quick scan from up here but there were lots of small beetles buzzing around in clouds which started to get in people’s hair, so we decided to make our way back.

We were just about to descend when we noticed a Hobby, possibly the one we had seen earlier, hawing for insects low over the top of the dunes just to our right. It came along the line of the dunes towards us, then shot fast and low down over the grassy slope right below us, catching something low over the grass and then coming back up to eat it as it passed.

Hobby

Hobby – flew past us catching insects low over the dunes

As we made our way back to the track, a pair of Stonechats were on the fence. They flicked off ahead of us, landing each time a bit further along. The male flashed a bright white rump as it flew – a characteristic more typical of continental Stonechats rather than the darker British race hibernans. The taxonomic status of the Stonechats on the coast here is uncertain and it is possible that continental rubicola Stonechats intergrade with hibernans here.

Stonechat

Stonechat – this male flashed a bold white rump as it flew

The Lesser Grey Shrike had come out again and was now feeding along a fence line across the fields, repeatedly sallying out from a dead stem and returning to the same perch. It attracted the attentions of the Stonechat and a Reed Bunting here, which perched close by, the Stonechat chasing after it at one point. The Lesser Grey Shrike seemed to take little notice.

On the way back to the minibus, we stopped to help a Garden Tiger moth caterpillar off the path and rescue a Four-spotted Chaser dragonfly from a puddle. A pair of Common Whitethroats was carrying food in and out of the hedge and a Greenfinch was wheezing from the top of an ash tree.

We headed round to Potter Heigham next. As we made our way in along the track, there were lots of dragonflies zooming around between the reeds, Norfolk Hawkers and Black-tailed Skimmers. A pair of Egyptian Geese were out on the grazing meadows. We could see a Spoonbill on the back of one of the pools, busy feeding with its head down and moving its bill quickly from side to side through the shallow water. The next pool had a large area of exposed mud in the middle. Several Lapwing were on here, including a good number of well-grown juveniles. A Little Ringed Plover was lurking in between two sleeping Shelducks.

At the end of the track, we climbed up onto the bank. Our main target for the day was Swallowtail butterfly and as we came through the trees one shot past us over the tops of the reeds. We saw several as we walked along here, but they were all flying fast and none were showing any signs of settling. The brambles and thistles are not in flower yet this year, so there are not so many sources of nectar here for them to feed on. Still, it was a good start.

We stopped to scan the pools on the corner from up on the bank. Two Spoonbills and two Little Egrets were standing on the grassy bank at the back. We had a good look at the Spoonbills in the scope, two immatures. After a while, they took off and flew round, landing back out of view on one of the other pools, presumably to feed. A Chinese Water Deer ran round the bank on the edge of the water.

Spoonbills

Spoonbills – there were two immature birds on the pool on the corner

There was a good selection of ducks, most of the drakes already starting to moult into their duller eclipse plumage. As well as the regular Mallard, Shoveler and Gadwall, a single drake Wigeon was standing on the bank among the Greylag Geese. We could see a couple of Great Crested Grebes in the edge of the reeds at the back and a pair of Little Grebes diving in the floating vegetation in the middle.

Scanning carefully, we found a drake Garganey too. It was asleep at first, but we could still see the bold pale stripes on the sides of its head. A second drake Garganey flew in and landed on the water nearby. It was further advanced in its moult, and a lot duller than the first. It swam over to the bank and walked over to the other one, waking it up. The two Garganey then walked higher up the bank and went to sleep together.

Garganey

Garganey – the two drakes sleeping on the bank

We walked a short distance further along the bank. A Sedge Warbler was singing in the reeds ahead of us and we could see its bold pale supercilium. A Willow Warbler and a Blackcap were both singing in the scattered trees along the bank. A Water Rail squealed from deep in the reeds. Several Avocets and Common Terns flew in and out of the pools and a male Marsh Harrier quartered over the reeds.

It was getting on for lunchtime now, so we decided to turn back. There were a few small blue damselflies in the vegetation along the edge of the path, and we picked out one Variable Damselfly amongst them. There were a few more butterflies along the lower track – as well as the ever-present Painted Ladys, there were several Red Admirals but no sign of any more Swallowtails. A Drinker moth caterpillar was on a dead reed stem overhanging the track. A pair of Stock Doves were flying round the old tin shed.

It clouded over as we drove round to Strumpshaw Fen, but thankfully the darkest of the clouds passed away to the west. As we walked across the road from the overflow car park, we could hear a Cuckoo calling in the trees nearby. We sat out on the picnic tables by Reception to eat our lunch. It was showing signs of trying to brighten up, but the wind had picked up a bit too. We decided to walk round to the ‘Doctor’s garden’, where it would be more sheltered, to see if there were any butterflies out there.

A couple of Bullfinches called from the trees as we walked along the track and as we got to the garden there were several dragonflies flying round bushes opposite. As well as a couple of Norfolk Hawkers, a couple of Scarce Chasers were perched on the brambles. The flowers in the garden were covered in Painted Ladys – we counted at least 20 in the two small patches by the track – but there were no Swallowtails at first. We decided to wait, as the sun came out at that point, and it wasn’t too long before a Swallowtail flew in and joined the Painted Ladys nectaring on the Dianthus.

Swallowtail

Swallowtail – nectaring on Dianthus

The Swallowtail was not the smartest individual, having sustained some damage and lots its ‘swallow tails’, but it was still good to get a close look at one. There were several Brimstones around the garden too, including a pair which were engaged in courtship flight. When the Swallowtail eventually flew off, we headed back round by the Reception and out onto the reserve.

It had clouded over again now, so there were not as many insects out as earlier now. We had a quick look at the Common Twayblades on the edge of the trees and stopped to watch a Bank Vole which climbed up into an elder and was feeding on the flowers. A flock of Long-tailed Tits flew through the bushes. There were a few damselflies in the vegetation around the pool at the start of Meadow Trail, including Large Red and another Variable alongside the commoner Azure Damselflies. A Marsh Click Beetle was perched on the top of a broken dead reed stem.

The wind was catching the bushes out along Sandy Wall and there was not so much to see out here. We did find a single Large Skipper in a sheltered spot and someone brought over a Buff-tip moth they had just found, to show us. A Willow Warbler was singing, appropriately, in the willows and a Reed Warbler from down in the reeds.

Large Skipper

Large Skipper – sheltering from the wind in the brambles

Fen Hide can often be quiet, but we decided to have a quick look just in case. It was nice just sitting there listening to the wind in the reeds. A Marsh Harrier was perched in the top of one of the trees out in the middle of the reedbed, and several Common Swifts were zooming back and forth low over the reeds, but there were few other birds here.

We had just got up to leave when someone else in the hide announced ‘I think I’ve got a Bittern‘. A quick scan confirmed there was indeed a Bittern, which had just climbed into the top of the reeds in front of the hide. It was tucked down in amongst the reeds at first and harder to see. It ruffled its feathers and had a shake, then stretched its neck up out of the reeds to look around, at which point it was much easier to get onto.

Bittern 1

Bittern – climbed up into the top of the reeds in front of Fen Hide

The Bittern stayed in the top of the reeds, looking around for a few minutes. It seemed like it was getting ready to fly, checking that the coast was clear first. Then suddenly it was off, labouring up heavily clear of the reeds and then disappearing off back away from us over the reedbed.

Bittern 2

Bittern – eventually took off and flew back away over the reedbed

That was a great way to finish off our day in the Broads, so we made our way back to the minibus, for the long drive back. We were almost home when we spotted the Little Owl in the window of the same old barn where we had seen it perched earlier. This time, it stayed put when we stopped, but disappeared inside again before we could all get out.

Nightjar Evening

After a break to relax and get something to eat, we set off again in the evening. We drove back round to where we had seen the Little Owl and third time lucky, got a better look at it. It was more active now, out hunting around the barns. It flew and landed on one edge, right next to the road, as we drove up, but flew back and landed on the edge of the roof. We stopped a discrete distance away and got out, getting a good look at it before it flew again and disappeared round the far side. We got back in the minibus and drove slowly past. The Little Owl was perched on a low wall just beyond the barns and we had a really good look at it from the bus.

Little Owl

Little Owl – we finally got a better look at it this evening

Our next target was Barn Owl, so we drove down towards the coast and round by an area that they usually like to hunt. There was no sign of any here, so we parked and set off down along a track through the marshes. It was cloudier here than it had been inland, and there was a fresh breeze blowing. A Red Kite was perched on a post. We flushed a Grey Partridge from the track, which flew out and landed on the grazing meadows. We got it in the scope and could see its orange face as it stood in the grass calling.

We heard Bearded Tits ‘pinging’ from the reeds behind us, and turned to see two juveniles climbing up into the tops. We had some great views of them as we stood and watched over the next few minutes, as the looked for food in the top of the reeds. Two more juveniles flew in and joined them, but the when the adult male flew in it dropped straight down into the reeds out of view.

Bearded Tit

Bearded Tit – one of the juveniles in the reeds this evening

There was no sign of any owls out here, so we turned to go. As we walked back to the minibus, we spotted a Barn Owl flying through the bushes the other side of the road. It was carrying prey and disappeared into the trees. A few seconds later it was back out again – it clearly had young to feed in a nest somewhere in there. It did well to catch something else almost immediately, and went back up into the trees again. When it flew back out, we drove round to the area where it appeared to be hunting. There was no sign of the male Barn Owl but a female flew back past us heading for the nest.

We needed to get a move on now, or we would late for the evening’s main event. We headed inland to one of the heaths to look for Nightjars. With the cloud tonight, it was getting dark quickly as we walked out to the middle. The first Nightjar of the evening started churring in the trees.

A squeaky call alerted to a Woodcock overhead. We turned to see it flying past, with rhythmic beats of its wings, roding. We would see it or another Woodcock several times this evening, flying over in this distinctive display flight.

We were had just arrived at the territory of one of the Nightjars when it started churring in the top of an oak tree right ahead of us, beside the path. Unfortunately it was on the far side from us, and when we started to walk round it flew, dropping off the branch with its wings raised, before flying out into the middle of the heath. We could still hear it churring in the distance.

We stood hear and listened for a while – then the Nightjar flew back in right past us. We thought it might be heading for another of its favourite churring posts, but instead a second Nightjar appeared, the female. The two of them flew round just above our heads calling. They did this several times, drifting away before coming back in for another look. The female disappeared but the male came in again, right over our heads, hanging in the air at times with its wings raised and tail fanned, flashing its white wing and tail patches. Amazing to watch!

The male Nightjar then flew up into a nearby oak tree and started churring again. Through a gap in the leaves we could see it perched on a branch, silhouetted against the last of the light, and we got it in the scope. Then it dropped out of the tree and flew out across the heath again. It started to spit with some very light rain now – which was not in the forecast! We stood and listened to it churring from some trees in the distance, then the male came in and flew round past us once more. The light was going fast, so we decided to call it a night.

As we walked back to the minibus, two more Nightjars had started churring further over. We had a brief glimpse of one silhouetted against the sky as it flew past. Back at the car park, yet another Nightjar was churring across the road and a Tawny Owl was hooting away in the distance.

 

26th Aug 2018 – Late Summer Broads

A Private Tour today, down in the Norfolk Broads. Given all the good weather this summer, it was disappointing that the day we were to go out was one of the few with rain forecast. Still it stayed dry all morning and the heavy rain helpfully held off until we had almost finished. It didn’t put us off getting out anyway, and we had a nice day out.

Having met in Wroxham, we headed over to Potter Heigham marshes to start the morning. Several of the pools have largely dried out over the summer, but some still have water in them. We headed straight down to the corner and up onto the bank so we could see over the reeds.

On the first pool we checked, there were several Ruff feeding around the muddy edges of the water, all in grey-brown non-breeding plumage now. A Green Sandpiper flew in calling and dropped down on the mud too.

There were lots of ducks, mostly asleep on the drier islands, mainly Mallard and Gadwall plus a few Teal, all in drab eclipse plumage now, as well as several Greylags and Egyptian Geese. We checked through the ducks carefully, but there was no sign of any Garganey with these ones. This is a good site for Garganey and they probably breed here, although it is very hard to prove for sure. Several Little Grebes were out on the water.

Moving on to the next pool round, there were more waders here, mainly Lapwings and Ruff. We could hear a Greenshank calling in the distance, and we found another one feeding here. It was joined by a Spotted Redshank, a dusky grey-brown juvenile. Through the scope, we could see its long needle-fine bill.

Greenshank

Greenshank – one of several at Potter Heigham today

Two Ringed Plovers dropped in on one of the muddy islands. A Common Snipe was feeding at the back, against the reeds, probing vigorously in the mud with its long bill, and a Water Rail appeared just behind it from out of the reeds. Two Sedge Warblers were working their way along the back edge of the reeds too – we could see their bold white superciliums through the scope.

As we carried on round, we looked across to see two Kestrels hovering over the grazing marshes, with a third perched in a dead tree nearby. A young Marsh Harrier circled low over the reeds beyond, dark chocolate brown with a contrasting golden orange head, and two Common Buzzards appeared above the wood in the distance.

There were lots of hirundines feeding out over the pools, Swallows and House Martins, presumably gathering to feed up before they look to depart for Africa for the winter. As we walked along the river bank, we heard some of the Swallows alarm calling and looked up to see a Hobby shooting past, before heading away over the river.

There were more waders on the pools on this side. We found several more Spotted Redshanks, all juveniles, and Green Sandpipers. Two more Greenshanks flew off calling. A single Black-tailed Godwit was feeding in the deeper water on one of the pools.

Spotted Redshanks

Spotted Redshanks – two juveniles with a single Ruff

Several Tufted Duck and a Common Pochard were nice additions for the day’s list. A couple of Cormorants were drying their wings on one of the islands. Two Yellow Wagtails flew up from behind reeds but dropped down again quickly, before everyone could get onto them.

When we got to the last of the pools, we turned to walk back. We still hadn’t found a Garganey, so we stopped to have another look through the ducks on the way. Three smaller ducks were asleep on the bank at the back of one of the pools. Two were Teal, but the third was a bit larger and even though it had its bill tucked in we could see it had a bolder pale supercilium stretching behind the eye, a Garganey.

Even though it was dry this morning, it was still rather cool and breezy. There were not many insects to see today, given the weather, but we did find a nice male Ruddy Darter basking on the path out of the wind on our way back.

Ruddy Darter

Ruddy Darter – basking on the path, out of the wind

Our next destination was Buckenham Marshes, over in the Yare Valley. When we got out of the car, it was now starting to spit with rain, though thankfully not enough to stop us exploring.

The walk down along the access track towards the river was fairly quiet until we got nearer to the far end. A young Chinese Water Deer appeared in the middle of the grazing marsh. It ran a short distance, then stopped to look around. When it set off again, it ran straight towards us, stopping just the other side of the ditch and looking at us from behind some vegetation, before speeding away across the grass. Two Red Kites circled up over the wood on the other side of the river.

Chinese Water Deer

Chinese Water Deer – ran straight towards us across the grazing marshes

As we carried on towards the river, we stopped several times to scan the pool at far end. There were lots of Lapwings hiding in the vegetation around the edges and several Ruff feeding in the shallows. Two juvenile Dunlin, with black-spotted belly patches, were picking around on a muddy strip in the middle. A careful scan revealed several Common Snipe around the margins, but we couldn’t find the Wood Sandpiper which has been here for the last couple of days.

There have been some Whinchats here too, but we couldn’t find those either as we walked out, and we presumed they were keeping down out of the wind. We found a sheltered spot in the lee of the hide at the end and quickly located one of the Whinchats on the fence below the river bank. We got it in the scope and had a good look at it, noting its bold pale supercilium, before it dropped down out into the grass out of view.

Whinchat

Whinchat – 1 of the 3 at Buckenham today

While we were scanning the pool from here, one of the group spotted some small birds down in the short vegetation out in the middle of the grazing marsh, where it had been mown. A smart male Stonechat was perched on a small stem and eventually two streaky juvenile Stonechats appeared out of the grass close to it.

The birds were feeding down on the ground in a damp depression in the field, so they were hard to see, but at least one Whinchat eventually appeared in the vegetation with the Stonechats. Eventually they all flew up out of the grass and landed on the taller thistles on the next block of grazing marsh which had not been cut. Now we could see there were actually three Whinchats here.

While we were watching the Whinchats, a small wader appeared down at the front corner of the pool. Through the scope, we could see it was the Wood Sandpiper – it had presumably been feeding behind the taller vegetation along the front edge, where we couldn’t see it. We had a good look at it through the scope, noting its pale spangled upperparts and bold pale supercilium, before it disappeared again.

We made our way back to the car and headed round to the reserve at Strumpshaw Fen for lunch next. We could hear Long-tailed Tits and a Chiffchaff calling in the car park when we arrived. On our way to Reception Hide, we stopped to look at the Feeders. A steady stream of tits were coming and going constantly, including one or two Marsh Tits and a Coal Tit too.

Marsh Tit

Marsh Tit – coming to the feeders by the reception hide

We ate our lunch in Reception Hide, looking out over the pool in front. There were lots of ducks here, once again all in eclipse, and the resident Black Swan was feeding out in the middle. After lunch, we headed out onto the reserve. It was spitting with rain now, but it was thankfully still light.

There was not much to see immediately from Fen Hide when we arrived. Two Grey Herons flew in and a lone Teal landed in the middle of the water, standing motionless for a couple of minutes looking nervous, before flying off again. Scanning the cut reeds below the hide carefully, we found three Common Snipe hiding in the vegetation. They were very well camouflaged and hard to see until two of them started feeding.

Common Snipe

Common Snipe – very well camouflaged in the cut reed

As we carried on round to Tower Hide, a Great Crested Grebe was swimming on the river, still looking smart in breeding plumage. Looking out over the pools in the reeds on the way, we spooked several large flocks of mainly Gadwall. A Green Sandpiper flew off with one group.

There were lots more ducks from the hide, particularly a good number of Shoveler. Even though they are all in brown eclipse plumage, their distinctive large bills still give them away instantly. There were several Ruff feeding around the muddy edges, and a few Lapwings.

Ruff

Ruff – feeding in front of Tower Hide

Three juvenile Marsh Harriers circled up out in the reedbed, despite the rain. They seemed to be playing, chasing each other.

There were several Grey Herons around the pool and we had literally just remarked that we had not seen any sign of one the Great White Egrets which have been here in recent days when one of them flew up out of the reeds. It flew back away from us at first, then circled round, giving us a good view of its long yellow bill, before it dropped down into the reeds again.

Great White Egret

Great White Egret – flew round before landing back in the reeds

With a couple more places we wanted to visit this afternoon, we headed back to the car and drove round to Ormesby Little Broad. The rain was picking up now, and as we walked out along the nature trail towards the broad it was all quiet in the trees. We had a quick look out at the broad from the platform at the end, which held several large rafts of Coot and a few Great Crested Grebes. We didn’t linger here though and on the walk back a Treecreeper was calling from somewhere in the trees.

Great Crested Grebe

Great Crested Grebe – a common bird on the Broads

Our last stop was at Rollesby Broad. Thankfully we didn’t have far to walk here – we could see the broad from the car park – but unfortunately it was now drizzling harder, blowing towards us, and visibility out across the water was poor.

We could see several terns in the mist right at the far end, but they were very hard to make out clearly against the reeds and trees. Two or three pale silvery grey Common Terns stood out, but there seemed to be two or three smaller, darker birds with them. At one point, two of them circled up above the tree line and we were able to confirm they were Black Terns, but they were still not easy for everyone to see.

Thankfully one of the Black Terns then came up to our end of the broad, and we could see it properly. It was a juvenile – with sooty grey upperparts, darker on the mantle, and a black cap. Despite the weather, we could see it was flying much more buoyantly, dipping down to the water’s surface to pick for food. When it made its way back down the broad, we headed back to the car.

It was time to call it a day now – we had enjoyed a very successful day in the Broads and the weather could do its worst now.

9th January 2016 -Back to the Broads

Day 2 of a long weekend of tours, and it was down to the Broads today. We headed out east of Norwich to Strumpshaw Fen to start the day.

As we walked out of the car park, a little group of Long-tailed Tits were making their way through the trees in front of us. There were lots of Blue Tits and Great Tits availing themselves of the feeders by the Visitor Centre, but no sign of any Marsh Tits here today. We had a quick look out on the open water by the Visitor Centre – there were plenty of ducks, mainly Mallard, Teal and Gadwall, with a few Shoveler and plenty of Coot. A lone Black Swan looked slightly out of place!

Setting off onto the reserve, the first bird we came across was a Nuthatch. It kept flying down out of the trees and feeding on the hurdle fencing around the warden’s house – presumably someone must have tucked some food in there for it. A little further down the path, a smart pink male Bullfinch was feeding on the brambles amongst the trees. A Jay flew across in front of us. Then a scan of the trees produced a Treecreeper working its way up a large oak tree.

P1140629Fen Hide – the pools and reeds were rather quiet here this morning

We walked out as far as Fen Hide. The hide was very quiet, but unfortunately so were the pools here today. We sat and waited for a short while in the hope that something might appear, but it was not to be. Several Marsh Harriers were out quartering the reedbed, a little wisp of seven Snipe flew up and circled round overhead and a Cetti’s Warbler sang from the bushes. We had quite a lot we wanted to do today, so we decided to move on.

There was more action in the woodland again. As we walked back, we could hear Marsh Tits calling. At first, all we could see was a pair of Blue Tits, apparently already engaged in courtship display. Then higher up in the same oak we finally tracked down the Marsh Tit.

By the old sand pit, we could see movement in the trees so we stopped to look. We spotted a single Lesser Redpoll first, feeding on the cones up in an alder tree, then realised there was another with it, and then a third. A Siskin, appeared higher up and was quickly joined by a second. We had a good look at them through the scope, then something spooked them and about 15 finches flew out – amazing how they were all in there!

IMG_4949Lesser Redpoll – there was a small party in the alders by the path

We made our way round to Buckenham next. As we walked over the railway crossing and out across the marshes, it was clear there were quite a few geese on here today. As well as the resident Canada Geese, there were good numbers of Pink-footed Geese scattered all over the grass.

We could hear Wigeon calling as we walked along the track, and the closer we got to the river, the more of them we could see. There were little groups lining the ditches and a mass of them on the pools. Not the number there can be in some years, possibly due to the mild winter, but there were still plenty of them here. Amongst them, we could see a few Teal and Shoveler and a pair of Shelduck.

P1140674Wigeon – Buckenham is an important site for this species

As we walked along towards the river, we could hear a pipit calling. It was not the classic ‘seep, seep’ of a Meadow Pipit and not as strident as a Rock Pipit. We saw it fly across, initially landing over by the river bank, before flying up again and coming down onto the edge of one of the pools. We got it in the scope – a Water Pipit.

We followed the track along, round below the river bank towards the old windpump, stopping at intervals to scan the marshes. Over on this side, we started to see White-fronted Geese in with the Pinkfeet. At first, a little group here or there, the more we looked we realised there were actually lots of them scattered across the marshes. The feral Barnacle Geese were also here as usual, accompanied by the odd-looking Ross’s x Barnacle hybrid. But we couldn’t find any sign of the Taiga Bean Geese here today unfortunately.

IMG_4960White-fronted Geese – there were plenty of these at Buckenham today

As we turned to walk back, all the Lapwings and Golden Plovers suddenly took flight. We had seen quite a few from the path, but once in the air we realised just how many there actually were. We thought this might have signified the arrival of one of the local Peregrines, but we couldn’t see it. The plovers kept spooking, and it may just have been that they were very skittish. A Buzzard did fly over.

We decided to have a look at Cantley Marshes next, just in case the Bean Geese were round on that side. However, as we got there we encountered someone walking back along the path across the middle of the marshes who recounted how the geese had all flown off just as he made his way back. It was now particularly quiet, so we didn’t linger here.

After lunch, we meandered our way back north, stopping at a few likely sites to look for Cranes. It didn’t take us long to find some – five in total, a group of three together and nearby another two. They all appeared to be adults, rather than the three being a family group. They were a little distant today, but we got them in the scope and had a good look at them, feeding out on the grazing marshes.

IMG_4967Crane – three of the five out on the marshes on our journey today

Our next stop was at Ludham. Even from the main road, we could see the mass of white blobs out on the fields. We turned onto one of the minor roads which criss-cross the old airfield and soon found us pulled up alongside looking at a large herd of wild swans. We had a look from the car first, confirming that a mixture of Bewick’s and Whooper Swans were indeed present, before retreating to a safe spot where we could pull off the road and get out to scope them without disturbing them.

There seemed to be more swans here than in recent weeks – at least 125 today. There seemed to be the same number of Whooper Swans, around 20-25, but an increase in the number of Bewick’s Swans to at least 100. Given that we had seen several arriving from the continent along the coast yesterday, it is likely that cold weather in Europe is finally encouraging more of them to fly over to the UK now.

IMG_4979Bewick’s & Whooper Swans – its is always good to see the two together

IMG_4974Whooper Swans – in the foreground

IMG_4989Bewick’s Swans – smaller, with less yellow in the bill

We spent a bit of time watching them. It is always a good opportunity here to see the two species side by side. In direct comparison, Bewick’s Swans are noticeably smaller with shorter necks and bills. The best way to tell them apart is the pattern of yellow on the bill – extending a long way down the bill into a point, like a wedge of cheese, on a Whooper Swan, but more restricted and squared off on a Bewick’s.

Our final stop of the day was at Hickling. We walked out across the marshes towards Stubb Mill, stopping to watch a large family group of Long-tailed Tits in the hedge on the way, loosely accompanied by a single Goldcrest.

Out at the watchpoint, the two Cranes were in their usual place out on the grass when we arrived, though half hidden behind a line of reeds so that they were difficult to pick out at first. They were rather quiet today – not as vocal as last week, when they had been bugling constantly. Perhaps the weather was not too their liking – it had clouded over and started to spit with rain a little by this stage.

There were quite a few Marsh Harriers already out in the bushes in the reeds when we arrived. A steady trickle of more birds arrived. We thought there might have been around 30 in the roost before they all took flight. Immediately we could see there were a lot more than that – eventually we managed to count 60 Marsh Harriers all in the air at the same time! Quite a sight. And still they kept coming, at least another 2-3 before we called it a night.

The first Hen Harrier came in reasonably early tonight. A ringtail, it circled and hung in the air over the fields for a minute or so initially, before turning and flying more directly towards the reeds. We didn’t see the second ringtail Hen Harrier come in, but picked up two together flying around between the bushes in front of the ruined mill later on.

The light was fading but the harriers were still coming when we decided to call it a night, given the weather and a desire to get back. As we walked back along the road – rather wet in places after all the recent rain – we heard more Cranes bugling and turned to see another three dropping down towards the reserve. That made it 10 Cranes for the day, a very respectable total!

Back at the car, while we were packing up, a dumpy shape darting across over the car park in the gloom was a Woodcock – unfortunately too quickly for everyone to get onto it. Another two flew across the road as we headed out, but they were even harder to see. Still, it had been another successful day in the Broads with most of the target species seen.

4th January 2016 – New Year in the Broads

Another Private Tour today, this time down in the Broads. The target today was specifically to find some of the unusual species we are fortunate to have here. Quality not quantity was the order of the day. It was a glorious day to be out – after the early mist burnt off, it was beautifully sunny at times in the morning.

We met at the NWT reserve at Hickling Broad. We did not have time to explore the whole reserve today, but it did seem like it might be worth a quick look out on the grazing meadows. Common Crane was a particular target species for the day. Our luck was in – we had not gone very far when we spotted a family of Cranes out on the grass, two adults and a fully grown juvenile from last summer. What a start!

IMG_4807Common Crane – two adults with their 2015 juvenile (to the right)

We watched the Cranes for some time, walking slowly around the field and picking down at the grass looking for food. The juvenile was obvious – lacking the adults’ black and white striped head and neck. At times, the adults stood and preened while the youngster carried on feeding.

IMG_4822Common Crane – one of the adults, preening

Eventually something seemed to spook them and they started bugling, before taking off and flying off across the reserve. We turned to head back and a sharp call caught our attention. On one of the gateposts by the ditch across the marshes was a Kingfisher. It sat for a while as we had a quick look at it, before flying off quickly across the water away from us.

We were not intending to go looking for the swans today – they were not on the target list for the day – but as they were visible from the road as we drove past it would have been churlish not to just pull off for a quick look. In the group nearest to us, we could see 20+ Whooper Swans and a smaller number of Bewick’s Swans. The latter were noticeably smaller and the yellow on their bills was squared off rather than extending down the bill in a point as it did on the Whoopers.

P1140335Whooper & Bewick’s Swans – feeding in the fields at Ludham today

We could see more swans further over in another field beyond, making about 60 in total. There was also a small group of Golden Plover in the same field. A couple of Skylarks flew overhead calling in the sunshine.

IMG_4834Whooper Swans – with the yellow extending down the bill into a point

A Rough-legged Buzzard has been seen at Burgh Castle for the last few days and the Lesser Yellowlegs was reported there this morning. The latter, a rare wader from North America related to a Redshank, has been hanging around Breydon Water for a few weeks now, but has been very mobile and hard to see. Still, with the target to find some scarce birds, this seemed like a good place to try next.

Unfortunately, when we arrived on site the Lesser Yellowlegs was nowhere to be found. There were lots of Common Redshank and a careful scan of the banks of the river channel revealed a single Spotted Redshank as well. In winter plumage now, it stood out with its silvery grey upperparts, bright white underparts and longer needle-fine bill. Out on the mud, there were also several Avocet, Black-tailed Godwit and Dunlin. We could hear Bearded Tits calling from the reeds behind us.

P1140337Breydon Water – looking across the estuary in the morning sun

We walked a short way along the bank so that we could get a better view of the estuary. There were thousands of birds out on the mud – waders including lots of Golden Plover and Lapwing, and a wide variety of dabbling ducks, particularly Wigeon and Shoveler plus a few Gadwall and Pintail.

We then made our way back and climbed up the steps to Burgh Castle itself, the remains of a 3rd Century Roman fort. From the high ground here, there is a fantastic view across the low-lying marshes – all the better to scan for birds. It was truly glorious looking out from here in the sunshine.

P1140341Burgh Castle – the view across to Berney Marshes

This is where the Rough-legged Buzzard had been seen, but unfortunately we could find no sign of it here today. There were several Common Buzzards and Kestrels perched on various gate posts scattered across the marshes, and a number of Marsh Harriers patrolling overhead. We had turned and started to make our way back to the car when a last scan revealed a smaller bird perched on one of the bushes. Putting the scope back up, we could see that it was a Merlin, before it flew off across the marshes.

We had other targets for the day, so we beat a retreat and drove on to Cantley Marshes. We particularly wanted to catch up with the Taiga Bean Geese, but they have been somewhat elusive at times this winter and there are not many here now – only two have been reported in recent weeks. We thought we would try Cantley first, but as we walked down to the gate from which we could scan across the grass there seemed to be rather fewer geese than normal present. A small group of geese were round to one side and the first two that we looked at seemed to have orange legs and bills. Putting the scope up, we confirmed our suspicions – the first geese we had found were the two Taiga Bean Geese. Result!

IMG_4848Taiga Bean Goose – one of the two at Cantley this afternoon

There were a few Pink-footed Geese nearby and they gradually worked their way over until they were just behind the Bean Geese. It was great to see the two species side by side – the Taiga Beans were noticeably larger, longer necked and longer billed, as well as having orange not pink bill bands and legs. We had thought the Taiga Bean Geese might be harder to find, but the White-fronted Geese are normally much easier to see here. Today it was the other way round, and we couldn’t find any Whitefronts. As this was another species on the target list, we decided to head round to Buckenham Marshes for a look there.

We stopped just the other side of the railway crossing at Buckenham and scanned across the marshes. It was immediately obvious that more geese were over on this side today, with a much larger group of Pink-footed Geese here than at Cantley. The White-fronted Geese were not with them, but eventually we found them in the opposite corner – when they put their heads up we could see the white surround to their bills. The usual group of feral Barnacle Geese were also here, accompanied as usual by a Ross’s x Barnacle Goose hybrid.

We wanted to allow ourselves enough time at our final stop of the day, so we didn’t linger too long at Buckenham. Driving back towards the Cantley road, we stopped to admire a large flock of Fieldfares in a stubble field. Despite being so well-patterned, they were remarkably hard to see when they weren’t moving, melting away into the background. Only when they flew round could we see that there were loads of them there.

P1140366Fieldfare – we came across a huge flock in a stubble field

We arrived at good time back at Hickling and took the scenic route out towards Stubb Mill. A large flock of Long-tailed Tits was making its way along the hedgerow, accompanied by a Goldcrest. Several Marsh Harriers were already quartering the marshes.

We were almost at Stubb Mill when a bird appeared above the bank ahead of us, with long stiff wings beating in a distinctive rowing action – a Short-eared Owl. We only got onto it for a couple of seconds before it dropped down out of view. Thankfully, once we got round to the watchpoint, it reappeared round that side from behind the trees. We were treated to a prolonged display as it flew round and round the marshes in front of us.

P1140384Short-eared Owl – out quartering the marshes for ages this afternoon

At one point, it disappeared back behind the trees and the next thing we knew we could hear a Kestrel calling loudly. The Short-eared Owl then circled up high into the sky, with the Kestrel initially in pursuit, before losing interest. We could see that the Short-eared Owl was holding something in its talons, presumably a vole. It clearly didn’t want to be robbed of its catch and after a couple of attempts it transferred the vole to its bill and promptly swallowed it whole as it circled high up into the sky. It then landed for a while in the bushes to digest – where we could get in the scope – before resuming hunting.

Even better, then a Barn Owl appeared as well and the two proceeded to hunt over the same area, in the same view at times. They seemed to ignore each other completely. In the end, we saw two different Barn Owls over the marshes in front of us, with another two further over.

IMG_4853Barn Owl – one of two hunting the same field as the Short-eared Owl

There were also a couple of Cranes out on the marshes in front of the watchpoint – we had heard them bugling as we walked out. They were round behind the Mill at first and harder to see, but after a while they flew round and landed at the back of the fields directly in front. Just as we had started the day, so it was nice to see another two Cranes at the close. The sound of Cranes bugling is a real treat on a winter’s evening in Broadland.

IMG_4860Crane – another two this evening at Stubb Mill

What we had really come to see were the harriers coming in to roost. There were already a good number of Marsh Harriers out in the bushes in the reeds when we arrived, but there was a steady stream drifting in from all directions. At one point we had around 15 perched in a long line. Only when most of them took to the air could we appreciate just how many there were – 35 in view at the same time. And still they kept coming in. We estimated that there were probably 55-60 Marsh Harrier in the roost this evening.

Dusk was already descending when the first Hen Harrier appeared, making its way in towards the roost through the bushes in front of us. It was hard to pick up but we got it in the scope and you could see the white patch at the base of the tail. Then more Hen Harriers arrived in a little flurry of activity, so that it was hard to estimate how many there were, probably three ringtails (females or juveniles) and one smart grey male which ghosted across.

As the light faded, we decided to start walking back to the car park. Just as we got onto the path, a plump shape shot across over the hedge in front of us and out across the marshes – a Woodcock coming out of the woods where it had been roosting to feed out in the fields at night.

It had been a great day – with all the main target species seen which you would hope to come across on such a glorious winter’s day in the Broads.

16th January 2015 – Broads Bonanza

The first day of a 3 day long weekend of tours today. We headed down to the Broads to catch up on a few of the local specialities. We picked up a couple of participants on the way, in Aylsham, and were rewarded with a Barn Owl hunting down by the river. A good start to the day.

The first stop proper was at Ludham. We could already see the swans from a good mile away. One collective noun for them is a “whiteness of swans” and this seemed particularly apt as 200 large white birds in a flat open landscape really stand out! We stopped nearby and spent some time studying them in the scopes. The majority (175+) were Bewick’s Swans and amongst them were a smaller number (25+) of Whooper Swans. It is always great to be able to see them side-by-side, to see the differences in size and structure, and the pattern of yellow on their respective bills.

P1100961IMG_2269Bewick’s & Whooper Swans – a herd of around 200 was at Ludham today

From there we moved on to Horsey. A drive along the coast road quickly yielded our next target – a pair of Common Cranes in their ‘usual’ field close to the road. We pulled over and watched them feeding for a while before they suddenly took flight and dropped down over a bank of reeds. Fantastic views! While we were still standing there, yet another Crane flew over. Unfortunately this one seemed to be injured – one of its legs was dangling beneath. It landed on the other side of the road and, whilst still able to move about and probably feed, it was clearly unsteady and would frequently raise its wings to steady itself. Such a great shame to see such a majestic bird in this state.

P1100966Common Cranes – these two were feeding close to the road

P1100969P1100973Common Crane – this poor bird unfortunately appeared to have an injured leg

With Cranes all around, we spent some time surveying the surrounding fields. Lots of Lapwing, Golden Plover, Fieldfare, Starling and even a Common Buzzard were out on the open grass. There were also quite a few Pink-footed Geese on view, but the bulk of the flock today were feeding further away. As we left and drove on up the road, we could see all three Cranes, two on one side and the injured bird on the other.

P1100981P1100985Grey Seals – the rookery at Horsey has had a record year

We stopped further on at Horsey Corner and walked behind the dunes out to the viewpoint for the Grey Seals. The rookery here has had another successful breeding season, with over 800 pups now recorded. Numbers have now dropped from the peak in November/December, but there were still a few pups out on the sand, as well as a selection of adults loafing on the beach.

While we there, we spent a while scanning the sea, which produced a couple of Red-throated Divers and a Great Crested Grebe for the day’s list, as well as a single Sanderling running along the beach and plenty of gulls taking advantage of the remains of those pups which didn’t make it to sea. Both on the walk out, and the way back, we were accompanied for part of the journey by a pair of Stonechats perching along the fence posts in front of us.

P1100977Stonechat – a pair was along the fence at Horsey

Due to roadworks, we had been forced to drive round via Hemsby to get to and from Horsey today. This should have been to our advantage, as several Tundra Bean Geese have been in with Pink-footed Geese at Hemsby recently. Unfortunately a metal detecting enthusiast had chosen today to prospect the fields they had been in, so the geese had moved on. So did we – we headed round to Strumpshaw for lunch. While we ate, we enjoyed a good selection of tits coming to the feeders, including a couple of Marsh Tits.

The Taiga Bean Geese which normally winter in the Yare Valley have been feeding somewhere other than their regular sites this year. With 7 reported from Cantley Marshes this morning, it seemed worth a look. However, in keeping with recent form they were nowhere to be found, so we moved swiftly on.

IMG_2274IMG_2275Rough-legged Buzzard – put on a good display this afternoon

A short drive to Halvergate and no sooner had we got out of the car than we were wondering where to look. On one side of the road, a Short-eared Owl was hunting back and forth across the grazing marshes. On the other,  the Rough-legged Buzzard was sat on a fence post. What a dilemma! We watched the Short-eared Owl for a while, as it was putting on by far and away the best performance initially. It looked stunning in the late afternoon sun.

Finally, as if in recognition of the fact that its lack of activity was costing it the attention it deserved, the Rough-legged Buzzard took to the air and spent a while hunting, hovering over the marshes. Through the scope, we could get a great look at its black-banded white tail and white underparts with contrasting black belly and carpal patches. At one point, it was even pursued by a second Short-eared Owl.

P1100988Short-eared Owl – 2 were hunting at Halvergate this afternoon

With the afternoon drawing on, we made for Hickling and walked out to Stubb Mill for the evening roost. The Marsh Harriers were already starting to gather and yet another two Common Cranes were feeding out across the marshes. As we scanned the fields, a steady stream of Marsh Harriers were drifting in to roost (we counted at least 30) and eventually we managed to pick up our first ringtail Hen Harrier briefly. Then a male Hen Harrier appeared, an ghostly apparition in pale grey, it flew in and dropped down behind the reeds. Then another ringtail appeared and spent some time circling over the reeds. A Merlin shot through, all too briefly before anyone could get onto it. A Kingfisher flew round in front of us and dropped into the ditch behind – it perched up on the bank for a while where we could get it in the scope. A Chinese Water Deer walked across the marsh.

However the day undoubtedly belonged to the Cranes. After the three we had seen so well earlier, it seemed like we couldn’t hope for better, but as the light faded a flock (herd?) of 8 flew lazily across in front of the watchpoint – quite a sight. Thinking that was a fitting end to the day, we set off back to the car. But as we walked yet three more Cranes appeared over the trees and, as we stood silently on the road they flew right over our heads and off over to Hickling Broad to roost. Simply awesome.

Link

13th January 2015 – Highlights of the Broads

I was out in the Broads for a day, catching up on a few birds I haven’t seen yet this year and checking on a few sites. It was a great day, with some really good birds – it is always good to visit the Broads at this time of year. Here are some of the highlights.

First stop was a quick look for the regular wintering flock of wild swans. First a small group of 6 Whooper Swans were in a field where the group had been a week ago. It didn’t take long then to locate the main flock – over 200 white shapes in a field really stand out! What a sight. I spent some time watching them, a rough count produced at least 180 Bewick’s Swans and close to 20 Whoopers, before the other 6 Whoopers flew in to join them.

P1100867Bewick’s & Whooper Swans – part of the flock of over 200 present today

Round to Horsey and I arrived just in time to see the farmer rounding up his sheep with a quad bike. All the noise and activity flushed 4 Common Cranes which had been in a field nearby and they flew lazily across the road in front of me and away towards Heigham Holmes.

P1100879Common Cranes – 3 of the 4 at Horsey this morning

Up at Horsey Corner, I walked out to check on the Grey Seals. There were still quite a few hauled out on the beach and some pups – a new one had just been born. As of 8th Jan, still over 100 pups had been counted, though numbers are now dropping. Over 700 have apparently been counted this year.

P1100883P1100885Grey Seals at Horsey

On the drive back, two Common Cranes had returned to the field by the road and where the sheep had been previously was now a flock of well over 1,000 Pink-footed Geese. A careful scan through revealed 5 Tundra Bean Geese, their orange legs and bill patterns giving them away, as well as several other more subtle plumage differences. A nearby Pink-footed Goose with orange, rather than Pink, feet (& legs) highlighted a pitfall for the unwary.

IMG_2245Tundra Bean Goose – one of a group of five at Horsey

From there, I drove round to Strumpshaw Fen. The RSPB reserve had flooded over the weekend, as the river overtopped on a high tide, and I wanted to check on the state of the trails. The answer was very muddy and likely to remain so for a few days. However, a bonus came in the form of a Bittern visible in the reeds from Reception Hide.

P1100892Bittern – hiding in the reeds at Strumpshaw Fen

A quick look at Buckenham and Cantley revealed a complete lack of any wild geese and relatively few other wildfowl. The marshes here have been slightly disappointing this winter, whether due to the mild weather or increased wildfowl shooting on the neighbouring marshes or a combination of the two.

Down the road at Halvergate, the regular Rough-legged Buzzard was to be found sitting on a post on the marshes. It did a quick fly round, showing off its pale tail base. However, the highlight was a Short-eared Owl hunting over the marshes. I watched it for about half an hour, quartering back and forth, occasionally chasing off the local Kestrel, and even managing to catch a couple of voles. It was great to watch how it dealt with its prey – mantling over it initially, constantly on alert and looking round between bending down to it repeatedly, several bites appeared to kill it, before picking it up in its bill and swallowing it whole.

P1100922Short-eared Owl – hunting the marshes at Halvergate

I finished the day with a visit to the harrier roost at Stubb Mill. I confess that I didn’t stay to the bitter end, with the weather having deteriorated from the earlier sunshine and some squally wintery showers now passing through, but there were at least 25 Marsh Harriers, two ringtail Hen Harriers (and a male that I had just missed), a brief Merlin, two Stonechats, a Chinese Water Deer and a pair of Common Cranes feeding in the fields before flying off towards Hickling Broad. Not a bad way to spend an hour in the late afternoon!

Broads Tours will run until the end of February, if you are interested in coming to enjoy some of this for yourself please let me know.

Marcus Nash http://www.birdtour.co.uk

23rd-24th December – Out & About

No tours over Christmas, but after a few days catching up on admin and getting ready for the festive season, I managed to get out on a couple of days to do some birding, explore some different sites and make the most of some great winter weather.

Tuesday 23rd was clear and bright, so I headed up to the North Norfolk coast. First stop was at Wells. There were several hundred Brent Geese in the harbour, bathing and loafing, and a quick scan through them revealed one which was slightly different – a bit darker, with a more obvious white flank patch and quite well defined white collar. However, it was not striking enough to be a true Black Brant, and after a longer period of observation it was possible to see slate grey tones to the body plumage – it was one of the regular Black Brant x Dark-bellied Brent hybrids. There have been up to three hybrids in the Wells area for many years now and in some lights they can look very convincing – a pitfall for the unwary. It is always a useful exercise to spend time watching them.

P1100504Black Brant hybrid – one of the regular Wells birds

A quick look in the woods at Wells revealed little but the regular tit flock. There were clearly lots of visitors up for the festive season taking their dogs for a walk on the beach or through the pines, so it was rather too disturbed.

At Holkham, there were several groups of Pink-footed Geese in the fields along Lady Anne’s Drive and a good number of Brent Geese as well. A short walk along the edge of the pines produced a pair of Goldeneye on Salts Hole and a Barn Owl enjoying an afternoon hunting session over the grazing marsh.

P1100515Goldeneye – this pair was on Salts Hole at Holkham

On the other side of the grazing marsh, opposite the church, a large group of geese was feeding on one of the grassy fields by the road. There were lots of Greylag and Pink-footed Geese, but in amongst them were also a small number of Eurasian White-fronted Geese. There were about 13 in total, scattered amongst the other geese – what appeared to be two family groups and a separate pair.

There were also lots of geese on the walk out at Burnham Overy. As well as the ever-present Pinkfeet, there were a couple of Barnacle Geese in amongst them. A group of Brent Geese was feeding on the grazing marsh beside the path and a quick scan through them revealed yet another Black Brant x Dark-bellied Brent hybrid. This is also a regular returning bird, which can usually be seen here and has been coming back to exactly the same area for many years. It is possibly one of the most convincing Black Brant look-alikes from a distance, with a very bold white neck collar and flank patch, but spending some time up close to it always becomes clear that the body plumage is not dark enough and has grey tones to it and the collar is not quite right for a pure Brant. It was also fascinating to watch how its appearance changed with the light, with the grey tones becoming much more obvious in the late afternoon sun.

P1100545Black Brant hybrid – two in one day! This is the regular Burnham Overy bird

The large flock of Golden Plover put on their usual spectacular display, regularly flushing from the field for little apparent reason, swirling round for a minute or so before landing back in the grass where they blend in surprisingly well. Up on the seawall, a couple of Short-eared Owls were out hunting over the grazing marsh. It was great to spend some time watching them, the distinctive stiff-winged seesaw action of their wings rendering them instantly identifiable even at a distance. While watching one over towards the dunes, a Rough-legged Buzzard appeared in the air above it, hanging in the wind and hovering before drifting off towards the pines. A short while later, and with the light starting to fade, two Rough-legged Buzzards appeared in the sky together and swept round each other for a few seconds before heading off in different directions.

The walk back was accompanied by a spectacular sunset over the saltmarsh towards Burnham Overy Staithe. As I got back towards the car, the Pink-footed Geese started to fly back in from where they had been feeding on the fields inland. A couple of enormous flocks came in low overhead, each several thousand birds strong, in long lines and v-shaped skeins, accompanied a cacophony of high-pitched yelping. This is one of the sights of a Norfolk winter’s day – truly spectacular to see.

P1100576Sunset over Burnham Overy Staithe

With clear skies forecast for Christmas Eve, a quick trip to the Broads seemed a good option, to check out a few different sites. It was a beautiful morning. Walking down towards the marshes at Cantley, the hedgerow was alive with birds and a few Rooks sat around preening in the sunshine. There were lots of geese on the grazing marshes – mostly Pinkfeet but also a good count of at least 70 White-fronted Geese.

P1100583Rook – in wonderful morning light

The Rough-legged Buzzard at Halvergate has been showing very well recently, and as I was driving past, I could not resist a quick stop to watch it again. As usual, it was out hovering over the marshes, flashing its white tail base.

P1100593P1100592Rough-legged Buzzard – hovering over the marshes at Halvergate

A quick walk out along the north wall at Breydon Water added a few more birds to the day’s list in spectacular scenery. A ringtail Hen Harrier was out, quartering over the fields. A twittering call revealed a Snow Bunting flying past – it always seems slightly strange to see one away from the beach, over the fields. Several Rock Pipits flew up from the saltmarsh calling and also a flock of about 30 small finches. From their calls, it was clear that the latter consisted of a mixture of Linnets and Twite. About half of the group flew round overhead, out over the fields before coming back and landing in a hawthorn bush by the path – a quick count revealed at least 15 Twite and a single Linnet, before they flew off again.

P1100606Twite – this small flock perched up briefly by the seawall

A quick drive round via Horsey produced a couple of Common Cranes again feeding in one of the fields by the road. I couldn’t resist spending some time watching them.

P1100615Common Cranes – this pair was at Horsey again

I finished the day exploring the area around Martham. The Pink-footed Geese were coming off Heigham Holmes, a constant stream of small and larger groups and big skeins. A male Stonechat flicked across the path and landed in the reeds on the edge of the ditch. I spent the last of the light watching a pair of Barn Owls hunting silently over the marshes.

P1100626Barn Owl – a pair were hunting at dusk