Tag Archives: Osprey

14th Oct 2017 – Autumn Extravaganza Day 3

Day 3 of a four day Autumn Tour today. It was a lovely, bright and at times sunny day, but with a nagging, blustery SW wind which didn’t ease until later in the afternoon.

Our first destination for the morning was Holkham. As we parked at the top of Lady Anne’s Drive, we could hear Pink-footed Geese calling. We turned to see skein after skein of them flying in from the east, presumably coming in from the overnight roost on the flats north of Wells. They flew in over our heads or round over the pines and dropped down onto the grazing marshes to the west of us. It is an amazing sight and sound, watching and listening to the Pink-footed Geese flying in here, a real sound of Norfolk in the winter.

Pink-footed GeesePink-footed Geese – flying in to the grazing marshes this morning

It was noticeably breezy already when we got out of the car, but as we turned to walk along the track to the west, on the inland side of the pines, we found ourselves in the shelter of the trees and it didn’t seem so bad. It was fairly quiet along here nonetheless, but we did find a pair of Goldcrests feeding in the edge of the pines above us. A Sparrowhawk flew out of the trees and hung in the wind above us for a few seconds.

GoldcrestGoldcrest – feeding in the pines above the path

However, once we got to Salts Hole, we found ourselves out in the wind again. There were lots of Mallard on the pool today, but looking carefully, we could see at least four Little Grebes too. A couple of them were diving out in the centre, but two were stationary at the back long enough for us to get them in the scope.

A Kingfisher zipped across over the grass at the back, but didn’t stop and disappeared again behind the trees. Two Grey Wagtails were more obliging, circling over the pool before landing on the mud at the back of the pool where we could get a good look at them. There have been a lot of Grey Wagtails moving along the coast in the last week or so, so these were probably migrants just stopping off on their way somewhere.

There were lots of Jays in the trees, but all we saw at first was the back end of them as they flew away in front of us. When we got to the gate just before Washington Hide, one finally landed in full view, hopping around out in the grass, so we could get a more complete view of it.

It was while we were standing at the gate that we heard Bearded Tits calling and looked back along the path to see several flying through the trees. Even more bizarrely, they then landed in the trees, something we have never seen before. Unfortunately, we couldn’t see them where they landed, but we could hear them calling to each other, half way up through the branches on the other side of the path. They stayed there for a minute or so, before first one and then the others all flew on and dropped down into the reeds in front of Washington Hide, a much more appropriate location for Bearded Tits.

As we walked up the boardwalk towards Washington Hide, we could see a large white shape at the back of the pool in front, a Great White Egret. It was immediately clear just how big it was – much bigger than a Little Egret. We stopped to have a look at it through the scope, admiring its long, dagger-like yellow bill. Then it walked back into the far corner of the pool out of view.

Great White Egret 1Great White Egret – on the pool in front of Washington Hide again

There were Long-tailed Tits calling from the trees behind the hide, but they were well hidden, tucked deep into the trees out of the wind. There was nothing in the sycamores by the boardwalk, so we went into the hide to see what we could see from there. There were lots of ducks on the pool, mostly Wigeon and Teal.

A Marsh Harrier was the first raptor we picked up from here, flying low across over the grazing marsh. A Common Buzzard appeared too and landed on a nearby bush. There has been an Osprey lingering around Holkham Park for a few days now, and scanning over the trees in the distance we spotted it circling over where the lake would be. Three Red Kites circled up out of the trees in the Park too, but whereas the Osprey dropped back down out of view, the Red Kites circled lazily across the grazing marshes to the pines.

We decided to have a quick look out at the beach, as much to admire the view as anything. It was a bit more sheltered on the north side of the pines, but it looked rather windy out to sea. There were lots of gulls feeding distantly offshore and in with them we could see several Gannets. The Gannets were fishing, circling round and plunging headfirst into the water.

Back on the south side of the pines, we continued on west along the main path. The trees around Meals House were being blown round in the wind, and were devoid of birds today, so we decided to make straight for the west end where we hoped there might perhaps be a lingering Yellow-browed Warbler. Unusually, we didn’t encounter a single tit flock on our way there – they all seemed to be hiding deep in the pines today. We did hear an occasional Goldcrest or Coal Tit calling.

The sallows at the west end of the trees at least held a couple of Goldcrests, but there was nothing in the sycamores on the edge of the dunes. It was just too windy today. A Red Kite was hanging in the air out over the dunes. After a quick rest and a careful listen for any signs of life, we decided to start making our way back.

Long-tailed TitLong-tailed Tit – we finally found a tit flock on our way back

When we got back to the crosstracks, we finally heard Long-tailed Tits calling. We ducked into the trees and found them in a sheltered glade. There were other tits and Goldcrests with them, and we also got a good look at a Treecreeper too. They made their way back out onto the sunny edge of the trees so we followed them. We finally got good views of all the main tit flock species, but we couldn’t find anything else with them while they were in view. They didn’t hang around, and after a quick circuit round a few trees, they disappeared back into the pines again.

As we continued on our way back to Lady Anne’s Drive, we had great views of a Red Kite which flew towards us over the track and hung in the wind just above us, before drifting back out towards the grazing marshes.

Red KiteRed Kite – hung in the wind above us on our way back

While we ate our lunch back at the picnic tables at Lady Anne’s Drive, listening to the calls of all the geese coming and going, we spotted another Great White Egret flying over the grazing marshes. It dropped down on the edge of a ditch, attracting the attention of one of the local Grey Herons, which chased in after it. It was great to see the two species close together, the Great White Egret being similar in size.

After lunch, we headed over to Holkham Park. We had been told there was a pair of Firecrests earlier, in the holm oaks along the drive, but we couldn’t find them at first. While we were looking and listening for them, we looked across to one of the houses on the edge of the park and noticed a lot of activity in a yew tree in the garden. Getting the scope on it, we could see a couple of Redwings and a Blackcap eating the berries. There were lots of tits coming and going too, and we figured we could get closer to the yew tree from the paths in the Park.

We made our way round there and stood by the yew tree, watching the comings and goings. A Nuthatch made several feeding visits in from the trees nearby and we stopped to watch a couple of Goldcrests in the yew too. At that point, we heard a sharper call behind us and turned to see a Firecrest in the top of some flowering ivy. It flew across into the yew and we had great close view of Goldcrest and Firecrest flicking around together.

FirecrestFirecrest – we finally found the pair on the edge of the Park

The Firecrest was alert, with crown feathers raised and spread, revealing a bright fiery orange crest, which meant it was a male. It disappeared deeper into the yew, but a short while later reappeared in a nearby holm oak. This time it had been joined by a second Firecrest, probably a female, but without their crown feathers raised now it was hard to tell.

There were lots of Fallow Deer under the trees, a little group of which ran across the path in front of us. After stopping to admire the Monument and the view across to Holkham Hall, we continued on down to the lake. It didn’t take us long to find the Osprey. It was in the top of one of its favourite trees over the far side of the water, perched on a dead branch. We got it in the scope and could see it was in the process of devouring a small fish – just the tail was left!

Osprey 1Osprey – perched in the top of one of the trees by the lake

We watched the Osprey for a while, but it seemed fairly settled where it was and, having just eaten, we presumed it wouldn’t be fishing again for a bit. We continued on round to the north end of the lake. There were a few ducks around the edges and several Tufted Duck asleep. It wasn’t until we got to the far end that we finally found a small raft of Common Pochard, a new species for the trip list.

A Kingfisher zipped past low over the water and disappeared behind the trees. Several Great Crested Grebes were out on the lake, a mixture of moulting adults and juveniles. Under the overhanging branches on the island at the north end, we found a couple of Little Grebes, an adult and a not quite yet fully grown juveniles. The juvenile was swimming round the adult, begging to be fed, but the adult Little Grebe looked distinctly disinterested.

Great Crested GrebeGreat Crested Grebe – one of several on the lake

As we made our way back along the side of the lake, we could see the Osprey was still in position at the top of its tree. A Great White Egret had now appeared down on the far shore too, perhaps our third of the day! This one was much nearer, and we got a great look at it through the scope.

Great White Egret 2Great White Egret – on the edge of the lake

While we were watching the Great White Egret and taking some photos, we noticed someone walking along the far bank. They stopped, but not soon enough to prevent them flushing the egret. We watched as it flew down the lake and landed again further along. But when we looked up into the trees, we noticed that the Osprey had flushed too.

Figuring that it might have gone fishing again, we made our way slowly along the bank towards the south end of the lake. Unfortunately, we had not even got out of the trees when we saw two people ahead of us pointing cameras at the sky right above their heads. The Osprey then appeared from behind the trees but it was always flying away from us, into the sun. It had already caught another fish and was carrying it off back to its favourite tree to eat it.

Osprey 2Osprey – heading back to its favourite perch with a fish

We made our way back up across the park. On the way, we stopped to admire the herd of Fallow Deer. Most of them had now gathered out in the open in the grass. We watched a particularly striking buck parading through the others. As we walked back through the trees, we found another buck vigorously rubbing its antlers against the fallen branch of a tree, presumably trying to clean off the last of its velvet, although it seems a little late for it still to be doing this.

Fallow DeerFallow Deer – part of the herd in the deer park this afternoon

With everyone suitably tired out after the various walks today, we decided to head round to Stiffkey Greenway for the last hour of the day, where we could have a look out across the saltmarsh from the car park, without having to venture too far on foot. There were plenty of Little Egrets and Curlew out on the saltmarsh, plus several small groups of Brent Geese.

In the distance, we picked out a lone adult Peregrine which was perched out on the sand flats. There were no other raptors hunting here this afternoon though – it was perhaps still a bit early for birds to be coming in to roost.

A couple of Yellowhammers were in the hedge by the car park, so we went round to the sunny side to try to get a good look at them. We got them in the scope, before they flew off and dropped down into the field. We could hear Long-tailed Tits calling from the edge of Campsite Wood, so we wandered over for a look. The wind had dropped and the birds had come out onto the sunny side by the car park. There were Blue Tits, Great Tits and a couple of Goldcrests with them, and we found a Chiffchaff flycatching in the top of the hawthorns too. Then, as they moved off back into the trees, it was time for us to head off too.

20th May 2017 – Late Spring Birding, Day 2

Day 2 of a three day long weekend of tours today. The weather forecast for today was much better – sunshine & showers. We saw some nice sunshine and managed to dodge the showers later in the afternoon. All in all, not a bad day to be out.

As we drove east from our meeting point in Wells, we took a detour inland. A male Marsh Harrier was quartering the field next to the road as we pulled into a convenient layby next to some farm buildings. A quick scan of the roofs and we located a Little Owl in one of its usual spots. It was rather distant today, unfortunately, and there was quite a bit of shimmer already rising from the concrete between us and it. Still, we got an OK view of it through the scope and it was a nice way to start the day.

Continuing on our way east, away from the coast, we turned into a quiet lane and found somewhere to park. A Grey Heron circled over as we set off up the lane. There were lots of warblers singing in the hedgerows here. A Willow Warbler was in full voice high in the bare branches of a tree. A Common Whitethroat sang its scratchy song from the hedge and a Sedge Warbler was rattling away in the damp field beyond. There were several Blackcaps and Chiffchaffs too.

6O0A1460Grey Heron – circled over the lane this morning

As we approached a block of poplars, we could hear a Great Spotted Woodpecker calling and looked round to see it drop out of the trees and down into a clump of sallows in the field. A Green Woodpecker was laughing from the poplars here too. Another Marsh Harrier quartered over the back of the meadow.

Walking on beside the wood, we heard the beautiful sound of a Nightingale singing. It was still some way ahead of us and just singing little snippets at first. As we walked towards the song, a bird flew out of the hedge ahead of us and across the road, flashing an orange-red tail in the morning sunshine. It was a Nightingale, but not the one we could still hear singing in the same place it had been. Nightingales can be rather elusive and we thought that might be the only sight we had of one today, and not everyone had seen it.

We continued towards where the song was coming from and found a convenient gap in the hedge. As we looked over, we could just see a shape perched in the sun – the Nightingale – but it saw us too and dropped straight back into cover. It was in a thicket of brambles and cut branches and for several frustrating minutes we could just see it moving around in the undergrowth as it sang. Then it came out into full view again and perched where we could all see it on a fallen tree trunk.

6O0A1483Nightingale – singing and enjoying the morning sunshine

The Nightingale kept hopping down into the thicket but then returned to the fallen tree trunk or a bare branch nearby. We had a great look at it as it perched in the sunshine singing. Eventually, it dropped back into the thicket and we decided to make our way back to the car. As we got back, we could hear another Nightingale singing in the copse next to where we had parked. We stood and listened to that on too, for a few minutes, before tearing ourselves away.

Our next destination was up on the Heath. As soon as we got out of the car, we could hear a Yellowhammer singing. We looked round and quickly located a bright yellow-headed male perched in the top of a yellow-flowered gorse bush. We had a really good look at it through the scope, before it dropped down to the ground beyond.

IMG_4381Yellowhammer – a smart yellow-headed male, singing by the car park

The Heath was alive with warbler singing too this morning, probably making up for time after the cold and damp weather yesterday. A Blackcap was singing in the trees in the car park. As we walked up the path, we could hear the sweet descending song of a Willow Warbler. A Common Whitethroat was scratching away on top of some brambles. A Chiffchaff was chiffing and chaffing in the birches.

There is no shortage of Linnets on the Heath and everywhere we went we encountered little groups of them, perched in the gorse or up in the trees. Several already had young. Linnet used to be a common farmland bird but sadly they are now much scarcer. Thankfully they still do well in certain places here, particularly on the heaths and the coastal dunes.

6O0A1499Linnet – still a common bird up on the Heath

There was no sound from the Dartford Warblers at the first place we tried, so we made our way round to the other side of the Heath to try our luck there. On our way, a Woodlark flew across and landed on the side of the path ahead of us. We got it in the scope and watched it walking along, picking at the vegetation along the side. It was collecting food for its hungry brood of youngsters somewhere – we could see it already had a caterpillar in its bill.

It was busy on the Heath this morning and a large and noisy group appeared at the other end of the path. The Woodlark ran into the vegetation bordering the path and then flew up and over onto some rough ground beyond. As we walked on towards where it had landed, we could just see it standing on a clod of earth, before it took off. A second Woodlark took off too, it had obviously been collecting food nearby, and the two of them disappeared off over the Heath, calling, just as the large group walked up the path.

6O0A1510Woodlark – collecting food for its young

There were thankfully no crowds of people in the place where we hoped to find the Dartford Warblers today. Unfortunately, at first, there were no Dartford Warblers either! We had to content ourselves with watching a family group of Stonechats – a pair with at least two streaky juveniles. The male Stonechat then appeared on the gorse in front of us and started singing and song-flighting.

Just as we thought our luck might be out, a Dartford Warbler appeared, thought it was too quick as it darted into the gorse nearby. It wasn’t going to give itself up easily, and after a minute or so, we all got a brief view of it as it flew across the path in front of us and disappeared back down into the gorse. We stood staring into the bushes where it had gone but it didn’t come back out.

We really wanted a better view of a Dartford Warbler, and eventually another one appeared on the other side of the path. We tried to follow this one for a while, but again, all we got at first were very frustrating glimpses as it hopped up onto the top of the gorse, saw us, and darted straight back into cover. After we saw it disappear over the bushes a short distance away, we heard it singing. Hurrying along to the corner, we could finally see it, a male Dartford Warbler, picking around in the yellow flowers in the top of a gorse bush. It fed here for a minute or so, before zooming off back past us with something in its bill.

6O0A1518Dartford Warbler – played hard to get, but finally gave itself up for us

There has been an Iberian Chiffchaff at Walsey Hills, near Cley, for the last five days and it was reported to be singing again this morning, so we thought we would just have enough time for a quick visit there before lunch. Iberian Chiffchaff is very similar in appearance to our Common Chiffchaff, but has a very different song (not just a Spanish accent!!), so it was most important to hear it.

However, when we got there nothing had been heard from it for over half an hour. We stayed a few minutes, listening to several Common Chiffchaffs singing away, as well as a Blackcap. It seemed like it had gone quiet, so we reasoned we would be better going for lunch first and having another go afterwards.

6O0A1520Common Chiffchaff – singing away at Walsey Hills, instead of the Iberian Chiffchaff

We ate our lunch at the picnic tables in front of the visitor centre at Cley, a nice place to sit in the sunshine. Then after lunch, we drove back and parked by the East Bank, before walking along to Walsey Hills again. A Tawny Owl hooted from North Foreland wood as we walked in along the path. It turned out it had been the right decision to go for lunch, as the Iberian Chiffchaff had still not been heard again. We had a quick walk through the trees and up round the hill at the back, but we couldn’t hear anything either.

It felt like we were out of luck with this one, so rather than waste too long here, we decided to do something else instead. We walked back past the small crowd waiting patiently by the willows at the back of the trees and up the path towards the road. We were almost out of the trees when we heard the Iberian Chiffchaff singing right by the path.

Unfortunately, it was in a thick clump where we couldn’t see it. The Iberian Chiffchaff sang six or so times in succession – a combination of ‘chiff, chiff, chiff’, ‘hweet, hweet, hweet’ and ‘ti-tu, ti-tu’ and various mixtures thereof, very different from the rather monotonous ‘chiffing’ and ‘chaffing’ of our Common Chiffchaff, then it went silent again, just before everyone the crowd from further back could make it over to where we had found it. We gave it a few minutes, then decided to leave them to it.

A brief light shower passed over, so we collected our coats on the way back past the car, and headed out along the East Bank. A Lapwing was feeding in the wet grass below the bank and several more were displaying further over, the males tumbling and rolling in the sky as they sang their distinctive song. There were several Redshanks down in the wet grass too, and one or two of those were singing and song flighting too. A lone female Ruff was hiding in the grass and a single Ringed Plover was preening on the mud at the back of the Serpentine.

6O0A1540Lapwing – feeding in the wet grass below the East Bank

Most of the ducks which had spent the winter here have now departed, but we did manage to find a single drake Wigeon asleep at the back of the Serpentine. A few pairs of Gadwall and Shoveler will presumably be breeding here now. There were also lots of Greylag Geese out on the grazing marshes.

On the other side of the path, a pair of Marsh Harriers circled up over the reedbed. We could hear Reed Warblers and a Sedge Warbler singing from the reeds and got great views of a pair of Reed Warblers as they worked their way along the base of the reeds on the far side of the ditch. A Reed Bunting was singing from one of the bushes in the reeds, although it sounded like it had been rather short-changed in the song department, more like just a brief jumble of discordant notes!

6O0A1555Reed Warbler – a pair were feeding in the base of the reeds by the ditch

There were not many waders on Arnold’s Marsh today, apart from Avocets and more Redshank. A pair of Grey Plover over the back were still in winter plumage, in contrast to all the black-bellied birds we had seen yesterday. A pair of Little Terns dropped in to preen on one of the islands and a couple of Sandwich Terns circled overhead calling.

We were on our way to the beach but had just stopped to look at a Meadow Pipit by the path when we heard a Greenshank calling and looked over to see it land in the shallows. We got it in the scope and had a good look at it, but it didn’t stay long and quickly flew off again calling.

When we got to the beach, the sea looked very quiet. A couple of Little Terns flew past just offshore, possibly the ones we had just seen on Arnold’s Marsh. A party of nine Brent Geese flew past, surely heading the wrong way? They should be heading off to Russia for the breeding season. We were just having a quick scan over the water when we spotted a large bird circling some way offshore. An Osprey!

6O0A1566Osprey – a nice surprise find, heading west offshore this afternoon

It took a while for everyone to get onto it, but the Osprey gradually worked its way a little closer inshore as it drifted past us. At one point, a Sandwich Tern flew up to it and started mobbing it, hastening it on its way. We watched as it headed off west towards Blakeney Point. An unexpected bonus – Ospreys are not common birds here, just passing through in small numbers.

There had been two Temminck’s Stints reported again earlier today on the reserve, but they seemed to have disappeared and everyone we had spoken to said they had not seen them this afternoon, where they had been on Simmond’s Scrape. We had thought it would be worth looking for them on the Serpentine, but they were not there either. As we were walking back towards the car, the news came through that they were on Simmond’s Scrape again so we headed straight round there.

As we walked into the hide, one of the Temminck’s Stints was picking its way around the edge of one of the islands, creeping about. We had a great look at it through the scope, although it was a little distant for photographs. Our smallest regularly occurring wader species, the Temminck’s Stint was completely dwarfed by a Shelduck which walked past it.

A summer plumage male Ruff appeared – a striking bird with jet black throat, breast and down onto the belly, but with bright rufous-ginger head and neck. It flew over and landed on the same island as the Temminck’s Stint, proceeding to chase it out of its way. The Temminck’s Stint looked tiny, even next to the Ruff.

After a while, the Temminck’s Stint took off and flew across the scrape, landing down in the far corner out of view behind the bank. We thought that would be it until someone in the hide pointed to a bird on one of the closer islands a few seconds later. Yes, it was a Temminck’s Stint, but this was a different one, the second bird. It was much closer to us and we got a great look at this one, much less well marked with black-based summer feathers than the first Temminck’s Stint we had been watching.

IMG_4486Temminck’s Stint – the second one, less well-marked, greyer, than the first

At this point it started to rain, so we stayed in the dry in the hide and had a scan of the scrapes. There were lots of Shelduck and Avocet on here today, but not much else of note. We could hear a Cuckoo calling in the distance. A Little Egret walked out of the ditch in front of the hide, ran across to the edge of the scrape, but then changed its mind and flew across to the far side of the ditch. A pair of Pied Wagtails were feeding on the edge of the water, and perching on the posts in front of the hide.

6O0A1602Little Egret – in front of Dauke’s Hide this afternoon

The shower didn’t last long, but once it cleared it was time to head back to the car and home.

12-16th Apr 2017 – Easter in Scotland

Not a tour, but we spent three days in Scotland catching up on some of the local specialities over Easter, with another day either side journeying up and back from Norfolk. As I haven’t been up to Speyside for a few years, it seemed about time for a return visit.

Arriving early for our overnight stop on the way north, we decided to have a quick look up on the moors. We were quickly rewarded with good views of at least 10 male Black Grouse. They were not doing much this evening, but we had high hopes for more activity the following day! Heading on higher up, we found our first Red Grouse of the trip too, though they too were keeping their heads down from the blustery wind.

It was an early start the following morning, to get up onto the moor for dawn. As we drove over the ridge and looked down into the valley below, we could see a scattering of black dots in the grass – 19 displaying male Black Grouse on the lek. They are far enough away here so as not to disturb them, so we got out of the car and could immediately hear their bubbling calls. We got them in the scope and watched them running round, flapping their wings and leaping in the air, with their body feathers puffed out, tail fanned and white undertail feathers fluffed up. It was quite a sight! There were a smaller number of grey-brown females there too, looking slightly non-plussed by all the action around them.

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6O0A5073Black Grouse – great to watch them displaying on the lek

A little further along, we managed to find a single male Black Grouse closer to the road, so we could get some photos. The Red Grouse up on the tops were now calling and displaying. There were also displaying Common Snipe in the valley and several Curlew and Golden Plover on the moors. It had certainly been well worth the stop here. Then it was on with the journey up to the Highlands.

One of our main targets for our stay here was Ptarmigan. Unfortunately, the weather forecast for our stay was not ideal – windy with blustery showers. Not great for hiking up to the Cairngorm plateau. The best day appeared to be on our first full morning there, but it didn’t look good first thing with snow overnight on the tops and low cloud lingering. Thankfully, after breakfast, the cloud base lifted and we could see a short window of opportunity.

We had hoped we might find a Ptarmigan on the slopes below the fresh snow this morning, but it didn’t help that there were lots of people walking up despite the weather today, it being Easter weekend. We got up to a plateau above 1000m where it was safer to stray from the path and a bit of exploration was quickly rewarded with a Ptarmigan running away from us over the snow. We followed it slowly and were eventually able to get quite close to it. A smart bird!

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6O0A5511Ptarmigan – on the Cairngorm plateau above 1000m

The view was impressive up here too, with all the snow on the mountains. However, we could see some darker cloud approaching, so we decided to call it a day and head back down. We were glad we did, as it started to spit with rain for a time and the tops disappeared again into the cloud.

Scotland April 2017 Cairngorms ascent_4Cairngorm Plateau – still with plenty of snow

On our ascent, we had seen a few Red Grouse, but on the way back down we were able to appreciate just how many of them there were on the moors here, and watch them displaying.

6O0A5354Red Grouse – plentiful on the moors lower down

Back down near the car park, a Ring Ouzel flew up from the shorter grass below the ski lifts.

6O0A5570Ring Ouzel – this smart male was feeding around the ski lifts

Crested Tit is one of the other key target species for any visit to the Highlands and we were not disappointed. They can be harder to see in the summer months, and familiarity with their distinctive call certainly helps in locating them. We heard quite a few Crested Tits, when we were in the Caledonian Forest, and got great views of two pairs. The second pair, we watched collecting nest material and the male courtship feeding the female. They are certainly full of character!

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6O0A5922Crested Tits – great birds to watch, we found this pair collecting nest material

As well as the Ospreys at the RSPB’s Loch Garten reserve, we saw several elsewhere. The best moment was probably one flying past the window of our B&B while we were eating our breakfast one morning!

6O0A6028Osprey – a female, calling from the nest, while the male was presumably off fishing

With just a couple of days to play with in the Highlands, and the best morning reserved for the hike up into the Cairngorms, we were always likely to be at the mercy of the weather with our other targets. On our second morning, despite cloud and showers, we headed up to the Findhorn Valley to look for eagles. As we drove up, we could see dark clouds over the head of the valley and when we got there the wind was whistling in and regular sleet showers were blowing through. Not ideal!

We sat in the car for an hour, scanning the hills, but a brief brighter interval produced just a couple of Common Buzzards. Two Wheatears were feeding on the grass in front of the car park and a pair of Common Gulls were hanging around there too. It seemed unlikely there would be any eagles this morning, so we decided to move on.

As we headed down the valley, it brightened up a little lower down. We made our way up over the hills and down the other side to the RSPB reserve at Loch Ruthven. Between the showers, we walked along to the hide. We could see three Slavonian Grebes out on the water, but they were all rather distant while we were there. There are still a lot more to return here yet. A summer plumage Red-throated Diver was fishing on the loch too, along with a few ducks – Goldeneye, Wigeon, Teal and Mallard.

6O0A5850Slavonian Grebe – one of three out on the loch today

With the weather improving a little, and after lunch back at the car park, we decided to have another go at the Findhorn Valley. As we arrived, the head of the valley was still in cloud and another wintry shower blew through. But we could see some blue cloud coming in from behind us and we hadn’t been back five minutes when a 1st winter Golden Eagle appeared over the ridge at the back of the car park. Unfortunately it didn’t hang around and we just got a quick look at it as it disappeared back over the top. A short while later, the Golden Eagle reappeared much further down and we watched as it flew across the valley being mobbed by a Raven. A Peregrine was flying around the hill behind us too.

It seemed unlikely we would better that today and with the day getting on, we headed back down the valley. We took a different route back and stopped off by another loch on the way. It was very windy and  the wind was whipping up the water so it was quite choppy. Scanning with the scope in the lee of the car we were able to locate a single Black-throated Diver, a stunning bird in full summer plumage.

There were various other birds which we caught up with on our travels around Speyside. We heard lots of crossbills, but they were rather flighty and often hard to see. We had nice views of Common Crossbill in the forest and of a family which came down to the small deciduous trees alongside the river in Carrbridge, presumably to drink. There were more crossbills in Abernethy Forest, and we heard both Common and Scottish/Parrot Crossbill flight calls from birds passing overhead. Some larger billed birds resembling Scottish Crossbill were feeding in the trees around the car park at Forest Lodge on a couple of occasions but did not hang around long enough for us to get a prolonged look at them.

6O0A5621Common Crossbill – along the river at Carrbridge

Exploring along various rivers produced a few additional species too, including Goosander, Common Sandpiper and Grey Wagtail. However, the pick of the bunch was Dipper – it was great to watch them feeding in the shallows, dipping under the water.

6O0A5830Chestnut-bellied Dipper – the native British subspecies of Dipper

Mammalian interest on this trip was provided chiefly by the Red Squirrels which we saw at several sites. Two Mountain Hares were seen at the top of the Findhorn Valley. We also saw the herd of (re)introduced Reindeer in the Cairngorms and a few Bank Voles running around under the feeders at Loch Garten.

6O0A5599Red Squirrel – thankfully not uncommon around the forest here

After that, unfortunately our short visit to Scotland had to end and we started to make our way south…

28th Sept 2016 – Migrants From All Directions

Day 1 of a two day Private Tour today. It was a lovely bright and mostly sunny day, warm if a little breezy. We made our way west along the coast to Titchwell to start the day.

On the edge of the car park, we ran into a flock of Long-tailed Tits. They were chasing each other around in the sallows. We could hear a Chiffchaff singing nearby too. The feeders by the visitor centre were rather quiet, with just a Blue Tit, Great Tit and a single Chaffinch this morning.

Out along the main path, the dried-up grazing meadow ‘pool’ held just a Grey Heron and a single Moorhen. The reedbed pool was more productive. The drake Greater Scaup was still present, diving continually, along with a couple of Tufted Ducks. We could hear Bearded Tits calling and all of a sudden a flock of nine flew up out of the reeds and disappeared back out across the reedbed – we saw the back of them as they flew away from us.

A Curlew had earlier circled over the saltmarsh towards Thornham, but now there seemed to be a bit of a commotion over there. We turned to see several Curlews, Redshank and gulls all flying around – everything appeared to have taken to the air. Scanning the sky, we found the culprit – an Osprey was flying over from the direction of Thornham Harbour. We watched as it flew over the saltmarsh, turning and heading over the visitor centre and disappearing behind the trees. A great start to the day!

6o0a2835Osprey – flew over from the direction of Thornham Harbour

We carried on along the path, past the Island Hide. A single Grey Plover and a couple of Redshank were on the saltmarsh pool.  A Water Rail flew out from the edge of the reeds below us, but turned straight back in to cover, where it started squealing. Then we stopped and scanned the freshmarsh from the bank. There were large numbers of ducks on here today – a lot of Teal, but also a good number of Wigeon and a few Shoveler.

There were quite a few Ruff in the deeper water, feeding in amongst the Teal. One of the grassy islands was full of Golden Plover, looking bright with their golden-spangled upperparts catching the morning sunshine. A single Bar-tailed Godwit was preening nearby – we had a good look at it through the scope, admiring its more strongly marked upperparts and slightly upturned bill, compared to all the Black-tailed Godwits further back.

The muddier edges of the islands held quite a few Dunlin and we started to work our way through to see if we could find something else with them. All the Golden Plover took off and a Little Stint flew in and landed in the water just behind some of the Dunlin. We were just having a good look at it when everything took flight. Through the whirling flocks we could see a larger bird approaching and a Peregrine flew in and landed on one of the islands in front of Parrinder Hide.

img_7384Peregrine – this juvenile landed on the freshmarsh

The Peregrine was a juvenile and seemed in no hurry to go anywhere. The waders flew round for a while and eventually landed over on the reedbed side of the freshmarsh, as far as they could get from the Peregrine. We scanned through them again and found a Curlew Sandpiper. It gradually came back a bit closer to the path as the birds relaxed a little, at which point we had it side by side with a Dunlin. A great comparison, the Curlew Sandpiper was noticeably a little larger with a slightly longer bill and cleaner, paler underparts. A second Curlew Sandpiper was further over with more Dunlin.

img_7398Curlew Sandpiper – at least two were on the freshmarsh again today

There were also a couple of Spotted Redshanks now, out in the middle of the water, paler than the Common Redshanks, silvery-grey above and whiter below. One of the Spotted Redshanks had gone to sleep but, through the scope, we could see the other’s longer, needle fine bill. Three more Bearded Tits started calling from the reeds below the path a little further along and then flew past us, back towards Island Hide.

By the time we got round to Parrinder Hide, the Peregrine had flown off. But there was still a distinct lack of birds in front of the hide as a consequence of its earlier presence. Further over, on the far side of the island, we found the Little Stint again, feeding with a couple of Dunlin. We had a good look round, but we couldn’t find any sign of the Pectoral Sandpiper which has been here for the past few days.

6o0a2840Curlew – there were several on the Volunteer Marsh

From the other side of the Parrinder Hide, we could see several Curlews out on the Volunteer Marsh, but not much else today. A single Bar-tailed Godwit on the far side walked down towards the channel by the main path, so we headed round there for a better look. A Little Egret and a couple of Redshanks were feeding along the channel, but the Bar-tailed Godwit walked quickly away as we approached along the path.

6o0a2858Bar-tailed Godwit – on the Volunteer Marsh, by the path briefly

With the sun shining, we decided to make our way out towards the beach. As we walked up to the tidal pools, we heard a Kingfisher call and saw it fly into the bushes along bank straight ahead  of us. Moving a little way further along the path, we could see where it was perched. We watched it for a while, as it flew between various branches overhanging the water, flashing electric blue as it went.

There were a few waders on the tidal pools today too, including a couple more Grey Plover and a little group of roosting smaller waders – four Ringed Plovers, a Turnstone and a Dunlin. Further along, just behind the beach, a lone Black-tailed Godwit was feeding in the shallows close to the path, a nice opportunity to compare with the Bar-tailed Godwit we had just seen. Looking out the other side, over the saltmarsh towards Thornham Point, we could see two Marsh Harriers quartering.

6o0a2880Black-tailed Godwit – feeding by the path on the tidal pools

The tide was out so there were a few waders on the beach. Down on the mussel beds, we could see several small flocks of Knot and quite a few Oystercatchers, as well as more Bar-tailed Godwits. Further along the beach towards Thornham, we could see several diminutive Sanderlings running around on the shoreline.

Looking out to sea, we picked up a couple of Great Crested Grebes and a winter plumage Red-throated Diver. A single Gannet was plunge diving a short way along the coast and a steady stream of other Gannets flew in past us too, heading west, mostly dark slate grey juveniles.

On our way back, we took a detour round via the Meadow Trail. There was a flock of Long-tailed Tits by the junction with the main path, but all we could find with them was a Chiffchaff. However, further along the Meadow Trail we heard the distinctive sound of a Yellow-browed Warbler calling. It called repeatedly, several bursts, but unfortunately remained deep in the sallows. It was a bit windy round here today, which probably didn’t help our chances of seeing it. Still, it was nice to hear.

We continued on round to Patsy’s Reedbed, stopping on the way to watch a Reed Warbler clambering around in some elder trees. Patsy’s was rather quiet, apart from a flock of Lapwing and handful of Ruff, but we did find a Common Snipe on there as we carried on round the path to the Autumn Trail. A little group of Swallows flew through west, migrants on their way now.

There had been a few smaller waders in the far corner of the freshmarsh viewed from the other side, but they had gone by the time we got round to the end of the Autumn Trail. We could see three Spotted Redshanks roosting over by the fence and heard a Greenshank calling. Another two Bearded Tits flew past and disappeared into the reeds.

There were lots of dragonflies out enjoying the sunshine today. Common Darters were everywhere, basking on the boardwalks, signs and handrails. A few Migrants Hawkers were hunting, mostly in the trees where they could find some shelter from the wind.

6o0a2827Common Darter – lots were enjoying the autumn sunshine today

After lunch, we made our way back along the coast to Brancaster. Parking at the end of Beach Road, we walked out onto the sand and turned east. Immediately, we could see a little crowd gathered further ahead of us, in the edge of the dunes. We made our way along there and were soon enjoying stunning close-up views of a Hoopoe.

img_7430Hoopoe – feeding in the dunes by Brancaster golf course

The Hoopoe has probably been here for over a week now, but has been showing well for the last couple of days. It seemed relatively unconcerned by the presence of so many people and was happily feeding in the sand, probing vigorously around with its long bill at the base of the plants growing in the dunes. It seemed to be finding lots of caterpillars. We watched the Hoopoe for some time, before it suddenly flew up over the dunes and out towards the golf course (it also likes to feed on the greens!).

6o0a2954Hoopoe – stunning with its crest raised

Next, we turned our attention to the sea. There were several Sandwich Terns feeding in the channel between the beach and Scolt Head. Behind them, more Sandwich Terns were loafing around on a sandy point. When they all suddenly took flight, we looked over to see a larger, dark, blackish bird flying straight into the flock. It was an Arctic Skua – a smart pale phase adult. It chased half-heartedly after the terns for a while, before drifting off around the north end of Scolt Head where we could see it distantly joined by a second Arctic Skua.

Returning to the car, we made our way back east along the coast and called in at Holkham. It felt like the wind had dropped a little while we were at Brancaster, but it seemed to have picked up again here and become a little stronger. It was quiet at first walking west through the trees. Salt’s Hole held a single Wigeon with the Mallard and three Little Grebes. A couple of Common Buzzards circled over the pines together with a Kestrel.

We had a quick look from the boardwalk by Washington Hide but the grazing marshes here were quiet and the sycamores behind were being lashed by the wind, so we carrier on west. We were almost at the crosstracks, when we stopped to check out the bushes in a sheltered corner out of the wind. Suddenly there was a rush of wings and a Hobby swooped in low, just over the bracken, and grabbed a dragonfly not 10 metres in front of us! It was all a bit of a blur as it came past so close, but we watched it as it climbed back up eating its prey. Great stuff!

6o0a2996Pink-footed Geese – flying in to the pools to bathe

We could hear Pink-footed Geese calling as we climbed up to Joe Jordan hide, but none were visible at first. Gradually small groups got up from the grazing marshes and flew round to the pools away to our left to bathe. The numbers gradually increased until there was a decent sized flock on the water, with birds starting to drift back to the marshes.

A Grey Partridge called from the grass below the hide and we could see it creeping through the vegetation. A Jay flew across and landed in the top of a hawthorn, carrying an acorn. Several Marsh Harriers circled over or sat perched in the bushes. We could see lots of Cormorants already in the trees, but watched as over 100 flew in to join them, presumably to roost.

However, the highlight was not one but two Great White Egrets which flew in across the grazing marshes. The first continued on east and landed again out of view behind some reeds, but the second circled round and dropped down behind Decoy Wood.

It was time to start making our way back, but just out of the trees to the east of the crosstracks we came across a tit flock. We could hear Goldcrests and Coal Tits calling on the edge of the pines and then a Yellow-browed Warbler started calling from the sallows beyond. The flock was working its way quickly back through the bushes away from us, but we managed to get a couple of views of the Yellow-browed Warbler on its way, before the birds all disappeared towards Bone’s Drift.

That was a nice way to end, so we headed back to the car.

6th May 2014 – Spring Migration in NW Norfolk

We started at Snettisham Coastal Park. The early morning rain was slow to clear, but Swallows and House Martins were streaming overhead from the start, together with a few Swifts. As the sun finally came out, several Yellow Wagtails were moving south over the beach and two Greenshanks flew over calling. At the north end, a group of Whimbrel fed in the short grass, together with a couple of Wheatears. Flopping around in the hawthorns, a female Cuckoo put on a good show. Butterflies were also much in evidence, the highlight being a single Brown Argus. We had hoped to get a good look at a Grasshopper Warbler, but they had been strangely silent all morning. We were almost back to the car when one finally started reeling and, with a bit of careful manoeuvering, we had it perched up in front of us.

In the afternoon, we moved on to Holme. The Hirundines were still pouring through overhead, in even greater numbers than they had in the morning, with a much larger number of Swifts as well. A delicate purring in the paddocks revealed a delightful pair of Turtle Doves, which we watched while two Cuckoos chased around in front of us as well. A Hobby flashed through overhead, another Grasshopper Warbler reeled from the bushes and a distant Whinchat perched on the brambles over the grazing marsh. We were almost ready to leave when a message alerted us to an Osprey heading our way, which duly passed over the marsh to the south of us. Still we were not done, and while we were driving back out of the reserve, we stopped to enjoy a stunning drake Garganey on a small pool by the road.

A cracking day out!

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