Tag Archives: Little Stint

14th Oct 2018 – Four Autumn Days, Day 4

Day 4 of a four-day Autumn Tour today, our last day. It was meant to rain all day today and, although it was wet at times, it was nowhere near as bad as we might have feared based on the forecast. The wind was very light in the morning, but swung round to the north and picked up a bit more in the afternoon.

With the forecast of rain, we headed over to Cley first thing, so we could take shelter in the hides. But when we got there, it wasn’t raining, so we decided to make the most of it and drove round to the beach first.

As we walked along the shingle, a large flock of Linnets came out of the weedy vegetation the other side of the fence accompanied by Goldfinches and followed by a number of Meadow Pipits. We were looking for a Snow Bunting, which had been here for a few days, but there was no sign of it with these other birds here.

Continuing on to where the vegetation grows out over the open shingle, we walked through amongst the sparse tall weeds around the edge. A couple of Skylarks came up from the edge of the grass and disappeared off towards the Eye Field, and then a Wheatear flew out and landed on a lump of concrete on the beach. It was looking rather bedraggled, presumably from the wet vegetation, and stood there watching us.

Wheatear

Wheatear – this bedraggled individual was feeding out on the edge of the beach

Just a couple of metres further along, we noticed something moving on the shingle right in front of us, as we almost trod on the Snow Bunting. It was feeding quietly on the top of the beach, where some low weeds were growing through the stones. Snow Buntings are often very tame, coming from places where they probably are not used to seeing people, and this one was very accommodating. It was a male, but rather dark grey and brown, an Icelandic Snow Bunting of the insulae subspecies.

Snow Bunting

Snow Bunting – feeding quietly on the top of the shingle ridge

A large flock of Ringed Plover flew round over the sea and landed back on the beach some distance further up ahead of us. Looking through the scopes, we could see there were a few Dunlin with them too, but the birds were remarkably hard to see on the stones and part of the flock was hidden from view over a rise in the beach.

There was quite a bit of activity over the rather calm sea this morning, so we stood for a while and scanned out over the water. A steady stream of Gannets came past, mostly flying east, a variety of different colours and ages, from dark grey-brown juveniles, to the white adults with black-tipped wings, and various stages in between.

Gannet

Gannet – several dark grey juveniles were among those flying past

Several Red-throated Divers were swimming on the water and we had a closer look at both an adult still mostly in breeding plumage and one already in grey and white winter attire. A Shag flew west along the shoreline, past us.

At this time of year, birds are arriving from the continent for the winter and there was a nice selection of wildfowl coming in over the sea today. A steady stream of small lines of Brent Geese flew past low over the sea, coming back from their breeding grounds in Russia, and we saw several flocks of Wigeon and Teal too. Two Red-breasted Mergansers flew past just off the beach together with a couple of Teal and a few Common Scoter went past further out.

Looking inland, a Marsh Harrier was standing down on the short grass on the edge of North Scrape, but there didn’t seem to be much else on there today. A Common Snipe and two Redshank were feeding on Billy’s Wash. Remarkably, the rain was still holding off – despite it being forecast to rain all morning – so we thought we would push our luck and head round to the East Bank for a walk. A pair of Grey Seals was bobbing in the water just off the beach, watching the people walking past, as we made our way back to the car.

The East Bank car park was quite full, so we parked at Walsey Hills instead. We stopped to have a look at Snipe’s Marsh first. We could see a Little Egret feeding on the mud amongst the cut reeds, but there didn’t appear to be any waders here at first. However, a careful scan around the edges eventually produced the hoped for Jack Snipe, well spotted by one of the group, asleep in the reeds on one side.

Jack Snipe

Jack Snipe – showed well, sleeping on the edge of reeds

We had a good look at the Jack Snipe through the scope. It woke up at one point and we could see its bill, thicker and shorter than a Common Snipe. We could also see the distinctive head pattern. A Water Rail ran across the mud the other side but disappeared into the reeds before anyone could get onto it. Helpfully it re-emerged a little later and walked back the other way.

There seemed to be some smaller birds on the move this morning, and we could hear Chaffinches calling overhead as we stood by Snipe’s Marsh. One or two Bramblings gave their wheezy calls too. A Cetti’s Warbler was singing from time to time from the reeds and a Bullfinch was calling over by North Foreland wood.

There looked to be some darker clouds approaching now, so we decided to have a quick look in the trees at Walsey Hills. As we walked along the footpath, we could hear Robins and a Chiffchaff calling. We had been lucky with the weather up until now but at this point it finally started to rain. We walked up to the top to have a look in the trees, but beat a hasty retreat.

It was time to head for the hides and get out of the weather. Having been to the Visitor Centre to get our permits, we walked quickly out along the boardwalk and straight into Dauke’s Hide. As soon as we got inside, someone very kindly pointed out a Kingfisher, which was perched down on the mud right in front.

The Kingfisher was wrestling with a stickleback. It had dropped it on the mud, but hopped down and picked it up and proceeded to beat it against the small mound it was standing on. It dropped it again and stood looking down at it, before finally picking it up once more and eating it.

Kingfisher

Kingfisher – was wrestling with a stickleback on the mud in front of the hide

We enjoyed stunning views of the Kingfisher – it kept coming closer to the hide, perching on a post in the channel just in front. Eventually, it flew off up the channel but a few minutes later it was back again on its favourite post.

Dragging our attention away from the Kingfisher, we noticed a Little Stint with ten Dunlin on Whitwell Scrape. It was hard to see properly from Dauke’s, particularly to get an angle for the scopes, so we hurried round to Avocet Hide for a closer look. The Little Stint was noticeably smaller than the accompanying Dunlin, with a shorter bill and cleaner white underparts.

Little Stints have been thin on the ground this autumn. The passage of juveniles through here way outnumbers adults, so it could be that they have had a poor breeding season, or perhaps just the persistent westerlies mean that the numbers reaching here have been low. Either way, it was nice to catch up with one today.

Little Stint

Little Stint – a juvenile with 10 Dunlin on Whitwell Scrape

The Dunlin and Little Stint were spooked by something and flew back across to Simmond’s Scrape, so we went back round to Dauke’s Hide. The Kingfisher had disappeared, but a Water Rail was now running around down in front of the hide, giving great views.

There were a few other waders out on Simmond’s Scrape today, including a Curlew, and a couple of Ringed Plovers. A flock of Golden Plover dropped in. Several Black-tailed Godwits were feeding in the deeper water on Pat’s Pool.

There are lots of ducks back for the winter already, mainly Wigeon and Teal, along with a few Shoveler. Looking through them carefully, we found a single Pintail, a drake starting to moult out of eclipse plumage. There was a big RSPB group in Dauke’s Hide today, so there was nowhere for us to sit. They had given up looking at the birds though and had settled in to eat their lunch. Eventually, all the loud discussions about double cherry bakewells and their different home made chutneys started to make us hungry, so we decided to head somewhere more appropriate to eat our lunch. Thankfully, the rain had now stopped again.

The shelter round at the beach car park was the perfect spot, out of the wind, which had now swung round to the north. After lunch, we had a quick look out at the sea. There were still lots of Gannets moving, plus one or two plunge diving just offshore now. Several Sandwich Terns were patrolling up and down. A Razorbill flew past, and a Guillemot was diving, out on the sea just off the beach.

There had apparently been an arrival of Blackbirds and Robins overnight, with a few seen around Cley first thing, so we thought we would see if there was any sign of activity down at Kelling Water Meadow. However, the lane was disappointingly quiet, just a few Chaffinches in the trees. Perhaps it had been too disturbed during the morning to hold anything here. There were lots of Pheasants in the fields, and Red-legged Partridges calling – this is a shooting estate after all. Rooks and Jackdaws were flying around the trees or on the hillside beyond the Water Meadow.

Down at the pool, the first thing we noticed were the gulls. There were quite a few Black-headed Gulls, but one young bird immediately stood out. It was a young Mediterranean Gull, a 1st winter. Continuing down to the corner for a better look, we found another two Mediterranean Gulls on here as well, a second 1st winter and also a 2nd winter. There were a few Herring Gulls, Lesser Black-backed Gulls and Great Black-backed Gulls too.

Mediterranean Gull

Mediterranean Gull – one of three immatures on the Water Meadow this afternoon

It was rather exposed when we got out of the shelter of the lane, and it was spitting with rain again. With the lack of any obvious sign of any migrants, we decided to head somewhere more sheltered.

On our way back west, we had a look up at the church tower and could see the Peregrine back again. It didn’t look particularly happy though, facing in to the wall and hunched up, presumably sheltering from wind & drizzle. We got it in the scope and had a good look at it – eventually it even turned its head to look round.

Peregrine

Peregrine – back on the church tower, sheltering from the wind & rain

Wells Woods seemed like a good place to finish, where we could get out of the northerly breeze. Several Little Grebes were diving out on the boating lake as we passed. We made our way in and up to the Dell, before we came to a tit flock. One of the first birds we got our binoculars on was a Yellow-browed Warbler. It was feeding in a small birch and we all managed to get a good look at it. A Goldcrest flew into one of the low bushes right next to us to feed, giving us a chance to appreciate just how small they are.

Their glipping calls alerted us to some Common Crossbills in the pines and we quickly realised they were right above our heads. We watched them flying down to the lower branches to find cones, before taking them higher up to deal with. They have been rather few and far between over the last year or so here, so it was great to see them and quite well.

Crossbill

Common Crossbill – feeding above our heads in the pines by the Dell

We followed the tit flock as it made its way through the trees for a few mins. As well as all the Long-tailed Tits, Blue Tits, Great Tits and Coal Tits, we could hear Treecreeper and Chiffchaff calling. Eventually, the Long-tailed Tits led the other high up into the pines and they disappeared.

It was a productive few minutes, and a nice way to end the tour, in Wells Woods. We got as far as the drinking pool, but it was time to head back, with people wanting to get away quickly. It had been a very good four days too, with a nice selection of different Autumn birds.

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10th Sept 2018 – Coastal Birding, Day 1

Day 1 of a two day Private Tour today in North Norfolk, for a visitor from Canada. The brief was to look for common birds too, not just scarcer species, so we set off to see how many birds we could find. It was cloudy, and cool on the coast in a fresh breeze, but thankfully it stayed mostly dry.

Our first destination was Titchwell. When we arrived, the main car park was only half full but there were already a couple of people walking round the overflow car park, looking in the bushes. We had a slow walk round too. It was quiet initially but as we stood and waited quietly a few more birds began to appear out of the undergrowth.

There were lots of finches in the tops of the trees, mainly Goldfinches and Greenfinches. We found several Blackcaps feeding on the elderberries, although a brief Garden Warbler was less accommodating and disappeared into the brambles. As well as several Blackbirds, a single Song Thrush was rather elusive too.

Blackcap

Blackcap – a male feeding on berries in the car park

There was nothing visible in the paddocks from the gate at the end, but while we were scanning we spotted a large flock of Golden Plover flying over the hillside beyond. The birds split up into several smaller groups and one came in over the paddocks and headed out onto the reserve.

We made our way down past the visitor centre and out along the main path. Our first stop was at the reedbed pool. There were a couple of Little Grebes diving out towards the back and one or two Coot, but not many ducks on here today. We could hear Bearded Tits calling out in the reeds, but they were keeping their heads down given the wind. Two Greenshank flew in calling and circled round over the water looking for somewhere to land.

As we walked on, looking towards the Freshmarsh we could see five Spoonbills hiding at the back. We stopped for a quick look, because we knew they would not be visible from the hides. Approaching Island Hide, we heard a Water Rail squealing down in the reeds below the path and looked down to see it chase a Moorhen out onto the open mud. We watched the Water Rail picking its way in and out of the reeds. We could still see it on the edge of the reeds when we got into the hide.

Looking out across the mud, two juvenile Curlew Sandpipers were feeding on the edge of the water. They were joined by a single juvenile Dunlin, given a nice comparison alongside, the latter with black spotting on its belly, the Curlew Sandpipers a little larger and with slightly longer bills. There were more Curlew Sandpipers further over, all juveniles, taking us to five in total.

A much smaller wader over on the edge of the reeds below the main path was a juvenile Little Stint. It was loosely associating with a larger flock of around 40 Dunlin scattered over the mud on that side. All the small waders were very nervous and kept taking off and whirling round.

There are still lots of Ruff out on the Freshmarsh, with all the adults now in their dull grey-brown non-breeding plumage. We could see lots of Black-tailed Godwits too, but they were mostly feeding in the deeper water right in the back corner. There is still a scattering of Avocets here but numbers have dropped significantly from the highs of late summer, as birds have headed off for the winter.

Ruff

Ruff – an adult in non-breeding plumage

Two geese on one of the islands were the resident Pink-footed Geese. They both have badly damaged wings, possibly having been shot, and were unable to make the journey to Iceland for the breeding season, but they seem to have survived quite happily here over the summer.

There are lots more ducks in now, as birds return for the winter – Teal, Shoveler, Wigeon, Gadwall – but they are mostly in their dull eclipse plumage at the moment. Most of the remaining Shelduck are juveniles, as the adults have gone off to moult.

From up on the main path, we had a much better view of the Little Stint. It was feeding on the mud just below, almost too close as it kept disappearing behind the reeds just below us! It was clearly much smaller than all the Dunlin, whiter below, with a short bill and two bright pale lines down the mantle.

Little Stint

Little Stint – a juvenile, close to the main path today

We had seen a single Curlew Sandpiper with the Dunlin here too, from the hide, but we couldn’t see it at first. Presumably it had been hiding behind the reeds too, as suddenly it appeared again just below the path. We got a great close look at that as well.

Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper – one of five juveniles this morning

We were already doing well for waders here. Then a Common Snipe appeared out of the vegetation on the island between the path and Parrinder Hide and proceeded to probe its long bill vigorously in the mud. A single Knot flew in and landed on the far side of the same island, along the muddy shore.

Two Spoonbills flew up from the back of the Freshmarsh and flew straight towards us, before seeing all the people on the bank and veering away over the corner of Volunteer Marsh. Just as they flew off, another three Spoonbills flew in from behind us, from out over Thornham saltmarsh. They flew straight past us, giving us great close-up flight views.

Spoonbills

Spoonbills – several were coming and going this morning

While we were watching all the comings and goings on the Freshmarsh, we heard Bearded Tits calling below us in the reeds. We looked down to see a small bird with a long tail dart across over the water in the corner. We had a couple more glimpses of them, but they were keeping hidden, out of the wind today. We did get better views of one or two Reed Warblers which were also flitting around low down along the edge of the reeds and a Reed Bunting which perched up more obligingly.

When we got to Parrinder Hide, we had a quick look from outside the hide first. We were instantly rewarded with two Spotted Redshanks, roosting at the back of the Freshmarsh with some Black-tailed Godwits. We got the Spotted Redshanks in the scope, first an adult in silvery-grey and white winter plumage and then a much duskier moulting juvenile. We could see their long and needle fine bills, very different from a Common Redshank.

As we scanned the Freshmarsh from inside the hide, a Common Sandpiper flew across in front of us, calling, and landed on the muddy edge out to one side. Further back, we could see a juvenile Little Ringed Plover on the mud too. It ran out along the edge of the island, where it was joined by a second Little Ringed Plover, also a juvenile. The two of them were then chased off by two Ringed Plovers, which at least gave us a great opportunity to compare the two species!

Little Ringed Plover

Little Ringed Plover – a juvenile from Parrinder Hide

A quick look out from the other side of Parrinder Hide produced a smart Grey Plover still in breeding plumage, and several Curlew and Common Redshank. Back on the main path, there were more waders along the muddy channel at the far end of Volunteer Marsh – lots more Redshank, and Black-tailed Godwits, and two more Grey Plover, this time mostly in non-breeding attire.

The Tidal Pools were rather quiet today, so we made our way straight out to the beach. The tide was out now and there were lots of waders down on the mussel beds. Bar-tailed Godwit was a particularly target and we spotted some down on the beach, so we walked down for a closer look. There were 4-5 Bar-tailed Godwits out on the sand and several with the more numerous Black-tailed Godwits on the mussel beds, including one still sporting rather rusty underpart, the remnants of its breeding plumage.

A single Whimbrel was feeding with all the Curlew on the mussel beds. Through the scope, we could see its short bill and striped crown. There were several Turnstones, very well camouflaged against the dark mud and shellfish, and a few more Knot too.

A Sanderling flew in along the beach but landed out of view. We walked further down to try to see where it had landed, but when we got there we couldn’t find it. At that point, all the waders suddenly started to take off and we looked up to see a juvenile Peregrine buzzing the birds on the beach before following the flocks out over the sea. All the waders flushed and flocks of Knot and Oystercatchers came right past us.

Knot

Knot – flushed by a Peregrine off the beach

The Peregrine turned and came in again, low over the waves. This time it had lost the benefit of surprise and it didn’t look like catching anything. It drifted away towards Brancaster.

We looked out over the sea and saw another dark bird low over the waves. This time it was an Arctic Skua. It had seen a Sandwich Tern flying past, and was heading straight for it, hoping to steal its lunch!  The Arctic Skua chased the Tern for a few seconds, the two of them twisting and turning in a dogfight, before it seemed to lose interest and flew off. A little late, a second Arctic Skua flew past us. Then a Mediterranean Gull flew past along the shoreline, a young bird, in its first winter. It was all action down at the beach!

Arctic Skua

Arctic Skua – two were lingering offshore, chasing the terns

It was time to start thinking about heading back for lunch, so we walked back up the beach. We spotted a Marsh Harrier drifting inland over the Tidal Pools, the first we had seen this morning. From the top of the beach, we could see another two Marsh Harriers coming in off the sea. They looked like they might be migrants from the continent arriving for the winter, but one of them was a juvenile bearing green wing tags. It had been ringed at Holkham a few months earlier, so that individual was certainly a local bird.

A Little Egret battling its way in over the sea from further out presumably was a migrant arriving, as was a single Pintail flying west offshore. Two drake Common Scoters were out on the sea.

We had been distracted with all the activity, and we were now starting to get hungry, so we made our way back. We stopped briefly to watch a Little Egret fishing on Volunteer Marsh, where the water was still slowing out of the channel. A Cetti’s Warbler was singing in the reedbed as we passed, but well hidden from view as ever.

Little Egret

Little Egret – feeding on Volunteer Marsh as the tide dropped

After lunch, we headed out along Fen Trail. Just past the Visitor Centre, we came across a flock of Long-tailed Tits in the sallows. We stopped to watch for a minute or so, and found various other birds with them – Blue Tits and Great Tits, several Chiffchaff and a Goldcrest.

We stopped at the gate on the Tank Road to scan the paddocks. There was nothing out on the grass but we could see two doves on the roof of one of the stables – two Turtle Doves. Through the scope, we could see their pink-washed breasts, black and white-striped neck patches and, as they turned, their rusty fringed upperparts.

Patsy’ Reedbed is a great place for ducks at the moment. As well as all the commonr dabbling ducks we had seen earlier on the Freshmarsh, there were several Common Pochard and Tufted Ducks here. Two female Red-crested Pochard were upending out in the middle.

The Great White Egret we were told was hiding in the reeds, but it wasn’t long before it strode out into the middle, where we got a great look at it. It flew round a couple of times too, so we could really appreciate its large size.

Great White Egret

Great White Egret – showed very well on Patsy’s Reedbed

Continuing on along East Trail, a large flock of House Martins were hawking for insects over the edge of Patsy’s Reedbed. In with them, we found one or two Sand Martins as well, browner backed and lacking the white rump of the House Martins. The Turtle Doves were now down in the paddocks, around one of the water troughs, and had drawn a small crowd of admirers.

Turtle Doves

Turtle Dove – these two were around the paddocks this afternoon

We had a quick look up along the Autumn Trail to the end. We could hear more Bearded Tits calling but once again they refused to show themselves. There were several browner juvenile Ruffs in the far corner of the Freshmarsh too. Then we made our way quickly back to the car.

By the time we got to Holme, the clouds had darkened and the wind had picked up. A Stock Dove was feeding in the grass in the fields by the track. We walked along the coast path behind the paddocks, but the bushes here were very quiet today, apart from a few House Sparrows. It seemed like there had been a clear-out of our summer warblers over the last day or so and no migrants fresh in.

The dunes the other side were quiet at first two, not helped by several dogs running around on the loose. We eventually managed to find a group of three juvenile Stonechats, accompanied by a Common Whitethroat. A Common Buzzard was perched on some brambles out in the middle of the grazing marsh.

With a lack of small birds in the bushes, we decided not to press on further. On our way back, we stopped to have a look at the Beach. A family of five Common Terns were out on the sand, in the distance. Scanning through the waders on the beach, as well as the species we had seen at Titchwell, we managed to find a group of Sanderlings to make up for the elusive one earlier. A Gannet drifted past in the distance offshore.

Red-legged Partridge

Red-legged Partridge – posing next to the road

It was time to be heading home, but we made our way back via the smaller roads inland. We had hoped to find a few farmland birds, but the bushes were quiet in the wind. A Red-legged Partridge posed nicely for the cameras on the verge, and we found one field over which a large flock Swallows was hawking for insects.

When we looked at the total for the day, we found we had seen or heard 99 species, including 23 different types of wader. Not a bad start – lets see how many more we can find tomorrow!

24th July 2018 – Waders & Other Wildlife

A Private Tour today in North Norfolk. It was another hot and sunny day, although a light sea breeze kept something of a lid on temperatures on the coast.

On our way out this morning, we swung round via the church where the Peregrine has been roosting for the last couple of months. It is not always there, but as we drove up we could see it perched on a protruding stone high on the tower. We got out and got the scope on it, getting a fantastic close-up look at it in the process.

The Peregrine was already looking a bit restless today, facing out, alert, with its wings held half open. Thankfully we had all had a really good look before it stretched its wings out and took off. We watched as it flew off east over the town. Presumably it had enjoyed a lie in and was now off to get its breakfast this morning!

Peregrine

Peregrine – setting off from the church tower

Our destination for the morning was Holkham. It was already starting to get quite warm as we parked at the top of Lady Anne’s Drive and set off west along the past on the inland side of the pines. It was rather quiet in the trees today. A Chiffchaff and a Blackcap were singing, and we could hear tits and a Treecreeper calling from deep in the pines.

The butterflies were out in force and enjoying the warm weather. The highlight was a Silver-washed Fritillary which flew in and landed on the brambles to feed. This species has been expanding rapidly and spreading out across Norfolk, but is still always a good one to see.

Silver-washed Fritillary

Silver-washed Fritillary – feeding on the brambles

There were also lots of Gatekeeper and Meadow Brown, a few Ringlet and a couple of Speckled Wood along the track here. A second generation Wall Brown landed on the path, but refused to open its wings.

Salts Hole was pretty empty save for a handful of Mallard. A Common Darter dragonfly hovered over the pool and a Southern Hawker was patrolling round the edge of the reeds. We stopped to listen to a Reed Warbler singing it rhythmic song, and it treated us to some masterful mimicry, imitating Blue Tit, Wren and Swallow and weaving them into its song while we stood nearby.

We stopped briefly up on the boardwalk to Washington Hide, to scan the grazing marshes. There was not much out here today, unusually not even any Marsh Harriers, so we continued on. Just beyond Washington Hide, we heard Long-tailed Tits and Coal Tits calling in the trees, we had finally found one of the tit flocks. We thought they might be coming down for a drink, but despite looking like they might be coming out onto the edge of the trees ahead of us, they disappeared back deeper in.

The hemp agrimony is in flower along the path now and is great for butterflies. Scanning the flower heads as we walked along, we added quite a few to the day’s list – Large Skipper, Peacock, Painted Lady and a smart Brown Argus which posed nicely for us. There were several smaller skippers and one did eventually stop long enough for us to see the underside of its antennae – it was a Small Skipper.

Brown Argus

Brown Argus – on the hemp agrimony by the path

As we approached Joe Jordan Hide through the pines, we could see lots of white birds still out on the pool below. When we got up into the hide, we could see they were mostly Spoonbills. Birds were coming and going all the time, but there were at least 15 juveniles, ‘teaspoons’ with only partly grown bills much shorter than the adults, recently fledged from the trees nearby.

We watched as a couple of the juvenile Spoonbills set off after one of the adults, which will have been one of their parents. They walked behind it, flapping their wings and bobbing their heads up and down. They wouldn’t give up either, until they had been fed, pursuing it right across the pool – little beggars! They are starting to disperse along the coast now and numbers will fall here in the next few weeks.

Spoonbills

Spoonbills – there were still at least 15 juveniles on the pool today

There were a few more Marsh Harriers from Joe Jordan Hide, juveniles flying around over the grazing marsh, practising their flying skills. A couple of Common Buzzards started to spiral up too, on the increasingly hot air.

Apparently, there had been a Great White Egret on the bank of one of the ditches just before we arrived, but it had flown back into the trees. Eventually one flew out again, and did a nice fly past, before dropping down into a ditch out of view. Then a second Great White Egret flew back out of the trees and landed out on the grazing marshes beyond.

It was time to start walking back. There were still lots of butterflies in the flowers beside the path and one larger, dull orange one stood out. It was a Dark Green Fritillary. They are fairly common in the dunes here at this time of year and one or two sometimes wander over to this side of the pines to feed. A two-fritillary morning!

Dark Green Fritillary

Dark Green Fritillary – feeding on the flowers by the path on the way back

When we got back to Meals House,  we finally found a tit flock out in the open on the edge of the trees, Long-tailed Tits, Blue Tits and Coal Tits. Three Treecreepers were chasing each other in and out of the trees and one kept landing back on the trunk of the same sycamore. A Blackcap flew up out of the vegetation the other side of the path and we could hear it calling behind us. There were also a couple of Chiffchaff and a Chaffinch with the flock too.

The walk back to the car from there was fairly quiet. A Goldcrest was singing in the pines just past Salts Hole and several House Martins were hawking for insects high over the treetops. As we drove back up Lady Anne’s Drive, a Red Kite was circling over the south side of the grazing marsh and drifted over the road behind the Victoria pub.

Our destination for the afternoon was Titchwell, but when we got there we stopped first for an early lunch in the picnic area. After lunch, we headed out to explore the reserve. As we came out of the trees, a juvenile Marsh Harrier was circling over the Thornham grazing marsh. It gradually drifted almost overhead, giving us a great view, all dark but for a paler head.

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier – this juvenile circled above us

The reedbed pool held a nice selection of dabbling ducks, but they are all in their rather dull eclipse plumage at this time of year. Two female Red-crested Pochards floated out from the edge of the reeds and a couple of Little Grebes were diving out towards the back.

A couple of Reed Warblers darted in and out of the reeds as we passed. As we approached Island Hide, we could hear Bearded Tits calling and caught a glimpse of one or two as they zoomed across the tops of the reeds.

The Freshmarsh is chock full of birds at the moment, but the first thing we noticed were the Spoonbills. These are birds which have already dispersed from the breeding colony at Holkham. There were several around the small island in the back corner, but a family groups of three, an adult and two juveniles, had landed out in the middle. Just as we had seen at Holkham, the juveniles were pursuing the adult, begging for food. The adult eventually took off and the last we saw of them, it was still being pursued out over the bank and across the saltmarsh

There were lots of waders on the Freshmarsh again today – birds on coming back after the breeding season already, gathering to moult. There are hundreds of Black-tailed Godwits returning from Iceland, and hundred of Avocets gathering here from around the coast. A bewildering variety of Ruff back from Scandinavia, mostly scruffy males in various stages of moult. Three Spotted Redshanks were asleep in amongst them, their black breeding plumage already mostly shed, with just a scattering of black feathers remaining in their increasing pale white underparts.

Avocet

Avocet – a fully grown juvenile, feeding in front of the hide

In amongst the larger waders, there were lots of smaller ones, barely up to the knees of the godwits. There were several small flocks of Dunlin, still sporting their summer black belly patches. Three Curlew Sandpipers with them, on their way south from central Siberia, adults with their rusty underparts now liberally peppered with pale winter feathers.

A Little Stint appeared with them. If the Dunlin were already looking small, the Little Stint was smaller still. A summer adult, rusty coloured with a much shorter bill than the Dunlin. There were several smart summer plumaged Knot too, still bright orange below.

When one of the young Marsh Harriers drifted out over the Freshmarsh, pandemonium ensued. Everything took off and it was really impressive to see all the waders in the air together – you really could appreciate at that point just what an enormous number of birds there was out there.

Waders

Waders – when flushed by a Marsh Harrier, we realised just how many there were!

The gulls have rather taken over the Freshmarsh this summer, mostly Black-headed Gulls but also over 50 pairs of Mediterranean Gull have bred too. A smaller gull was swimming out on the water – a Little Gull. We watched as it paddled round in circles, picking at insects on the water’s surface. We could see just how small it was relative to a juvenile Black-headed Gull nearby, which itself was not yet even fully grown.

Pink-footed Geese are mainly a winter visitor here, and should be in Iceland now, but two injured birds have spent the summer here. They were unable to fly north in the spring, presumably winged by wildfowlers shooting out on the marsh opposite – we could see their mangled wings hanging down. They were right below the windows of Island Hide today, giving us a point blank view of their delicate pink-ringed black bills.

Pink-footed Goose

Pink-footed Goose – the two injured birds were right in front of the hide

The Bearded Tits had been ‘pinging’ regularly from the reeds and we had managed to see two juveniles feeding on the mud on the edge of the reeds opposite the hide at one point. Then we heard Bearded Tits calling right in front of the hide and two juveniles appeared in the reeds. One clambered up through the vegetation, and we had a great look at it – rich tawny brown, with black lores.

Bearded Tit

Bearded Tit – a juvenile, playing hide and seek in the reeds

Heading back out along the main path, we stopped to look at two Little Ringed Plovers on one of the islands just below. We could just make out their golden yellow eye rings.

There is not much to see on the Volunteer Marsh at the moment, but there have been a couple of Lapwings feeding along the edges of the muddy channel just below the path in recent weeks. It is a great opportunity to stop and admire their beautiful iridescent plumage, green with patches of purple and bronze as it catches the sun. Even though they are moulting, they are still stunning birds!

Lapwing

Lapwing – shining in the sunlight on the Volunteer Marsh

The Tidal Pools are not tidal any more, after a winter storm filled in the channel which filled and drained them. They have been full of sea water, but with all the warm weather it is gradually evaporating creating a haven for waders, with lots of food in the emerging mud and shallow pools. There was quite a bit of heat haze now, in the late afternoon, but we could see more Redshank and Dunlin, plus several Turnstones and a couple of Ringed Plovers.

The Lesser Yellowlegs which has been around the reserve the last couple of weeks has also taken to feeding on here at the moment. It had gone to sleep when we arrived, sat down in the saltmarsh, and we couldn’t see any more than a pale dot!

We thought we could try again later, and continued on to the beach. A few Sandwich Terns were flying back and forth offshore, but otherwise it was fairly quiet today. There was nothing out on the sand – the tide was just coming in, the mussel beds were covered, and there were quite a few holidaymakers out on the beach today.

When we got back to the non-tidal Tidal Pools, the Lesser Yellowlegs was now awake. It was standing up preening, and despite the heat haze, we could see its yellow legs. This is the first Lesser Yellowlegs ever to grace the reserve here, a rare visitor from the Americas, so a nice one to see.

A short diversion saw us call in at Parrinder Hide on the way back. From here, we had a better side-on view of the massed ranks of roosting godwits and we found a couple of Bar-tailed Godwits in with the more numerous Black-tailed Godwits. We could see the rusty orange of their underparts continuing down under the tail. A Common Snipe dropped in and started feeding along the edge of the reeds to the left of the hide, by the fenced-off island. A Common Sandpiper appeared on the grassy island in front of the hide, amongst the gulls, rounding out an excellent selection of waders here today.

We enjoyed better views of the Mediterranean Gulls from here, the adults now starting to lose their black hoods, and their smart grey-brown, scallop-backed juveniles. There were two more ducks for the day’s list too – a couple of Teal, and a single Wigeon – none of which are looking particularly smart now, as they moult.

Mediterranean Gulls

Mediterranean Gulls – there are lots of juveniles on the Freshmarsh

It had been a great day, and we had seen lots of birds despite the unusually hot weather. We headed for home well-satisfied.

 

13th May 2018 – Norfolk in May, Day 3

Day 3 of a three day long weekend of tours today, back in Norfolk. It was cloudy most of the day, although we didn’t see any of the forecast rain (as so often happens!!). It then brightened up later on and was a lovely warm, sunny finish to the day.

Our first destination for the day was Titchwell – if it was going to rain at all, we thought we could make use of the shelter of the hides here. As it was still fairly quiet when we arrived, we had a look around the overflow car park.  There were a couple of Blackcaps singing and two Stock Doves in a dead tree beyond the paddocks from the gate but no sign of any Turtle Doves which had been here earlier. It seems very early morning is best and they are probably still flying off site to feed during the day. A Common Swift west overhead was the first of many we would see today.

Round at the Visitor Centre, the feeders produced several Goldfinches and a Greenfinch. While we were standing here, we heard a Cuckoo singing just beyond, somewhere along the start of the main path, so we walked round to try to see it. By the time we got  there though it had moved on.

When we got round to Patsy’s reedbed, we could hear the Cuckoo singing again. It had gone round the other side to Willow Wood now, and was obviously hidden somewhere in the trees. There was not much on the pool here today, just a few Tufted Ducks, a pair of Common Pochard and a pair of Shoveler. Two Little Grebes were chased out of the reeds just below the screen by an aggressive Coot.

Little Grebe

Little Grebe – one of two on Patsy’s Reedbed this morning

There were a couple of Marsh Harriers circling over the reeds beyond and several Common Swifts hawking low for insects. As we stood here and scanned, small numbers of hirundines were moving west – Swallows and a few House Martins.

As we walked back round via Meadow Trail, we could hear the Cuckoo again. It sounded like it was round by the back of the Visitor Centre and then beat us back to the main path – it was very mobile! When we got out of the trees, we could hear it singing out over the saltmarsh and we had a quick glimpse of it in the top of a bush in the distance before it headed off towards Thornham Point.

There were lots of Reed Warblers and Sedge Warblers singing in the reeds below the main path, and we had nice views of both feeding up in one of the small sallows. We stopped by the reedbed pool to watch several Bearded Tits flying back and forth low across the water. A couple of pairs chased each other up higher into the air, before dropping back down into the reeds. There were more Swifts now hawking over the reeds, and moving slowly off west.

Sedge Warbler

Sedge Warbler – in the sallows on the edge of the reedbed

Out on the Freshmarsh, there were not as many waders as we had hoped there might be, given the small groups we had seen dropping in at Cley yesterday afternoon. There were four Ruff, smart males of various colours, asleep on one of the islands. When they woke up they quickly flew off west.

Ruff

Ruff – four males resting on the Freshmarsh before flying off west

Other than those, we could only see one Turnstone, one Black-tailed Godwit and one Common Redshank. There are not that many Avocets on here at the moment either, although we could see a few pairs out in the fenced-off island, and several more feeding out in the water. Four Avocets were busy having an argument just below the path.

There are not many ducks left on here now, with most of the winter visitors having departed. The Red-crested Pochard were probably the most obvious, with a pair on the edge of the reeds shepherding eight ducklings, and another pair over just beyond Parrinder Hide. There were also a few Shelduck and Shoveler and one lone drake Teal, a useful addition to the list! Two Pink-footed Geese feeding on the bank looked to be injured birds, and one had an obviously broken wing.

The Freshmarsh has been largely taken over by gulls and terns and a careful look through them revealed our main target here, a single Little Gull. It was on one of the islands in front of Parrinder Hide, so we made our way round for a closer look. It was a 1st summer, a dainty little gull with a rounded head and thin black bill. Thankfully, we had all had a good look at it through the scope before it flew off.

Little Gull

Little Gull – this 1st summer showed well from Parrinder Hide

The fenced off ‘Avocet Island is now dominated by gulls, mainly Black-headed Gulls which had decided this is a nice safe place to nest. We could see quite a few pairs of Mediterranean Gulls in amongst them, their jet black heads and brighter red bills particularly standing out. One or two Mediterranean Gulls came in to collect nest material from the bank just outside the hide with the Black-headed Gulls.

Mediterranean Gull

Mediterranean Gull – collecting nest material from the bank by the hide

Several Common Gulls were loafing on the smaller islands in front of the hide, mostly 1st summers but including one adult which we had a good look at through the scope. There were quite a few Sandwich Terns on here too still and we watched a pair displaying and then mating. It will be interesting to see if they stay to breed here. A pair of Common Terns were keeping to themselves on another island out in the middle.

Sandwich Terns

Moving on. there was very little on Volunteer Marsh today, with the mud baked quite dry now after the recent hot weather. One Curlew was feeding in the channel at far end. The (no longer tidal) Tidal Pools are still flooded with seawater and pretty much devoid of life, apart from a handful of ducks. Three more Red-crested Pochard flew in and landed on here briefly.

Red-crested Pochard

Red-crested Pochard – two of three which landed on the Tidal Pools

At the beach, the tide was out now. We could see a selection of waders down on the mussel beds so we walked out for a closer look. There were several very smart Grey Plover, black below and white spangled above. Quite a few Sanderling, looking very different now in breeding plumage, blended in very well against the browns and greys of the mussel beds. There were Turnstone too, several also now looking very smart, and a few Bar-tailed Godwits.

There were a few terns moving back and forth just offshore and we watched one or two Common Terns and Little Terns hunting just beyond the edge of the sand. A careful scan of the sea revealed a single Common Scoter on the water and another flying off west. A couple of Fulmar flew west too, hugging the surface of the sea.

As we walked back, we could hear the Cuckoo again, now singing out towards Thornham, across the other side of the grazing marsh. We managed to find it up perched on the top of a hawthorn bush in the distance and got it in the scope. Finally, we had seen it! Three Little Gulls, all 1st summer, were now hawking over the reedbed pool, catching insects with lots of other gulls.

Almost back to the Visitor Centre, we heard a Siskin singing in the willows above the path. As we walked past, it dropped down onto the feeders. It was time for lunch now so we stopped to eat on one of the picnic tables by the Visitor Centre.

Siskin

Siskin – dropped in to the feeders briefly

After lunch, we headed inland to Choseley. There were a couple of Yellowhammers by the road on the way up but otherwise it was fairly quiet around the drying barns. We dropped down again to the coast at Holme, where we thought we would have a quick look in the paddocks. The sun was out now, and it was quickly warming up.

As we walked back along the bank, a Common Whitethroat was subsinging in the brambles, and appeared to be chasing a female, but remained unusually mostly hidden in the vegetation. A Willow Warbler was singing in a small sallow, and we could see the lovely light lemon yellow wash on its breast in the sunshine. A pair of Lesser Whitethroats were flicking around in the top of a large hawthorn bush briefly before they flew off.

We could hear another Cuckoo singing, but it sounded to be some way off at first. Helpfully, it then flew in and landed in the top of one of the poplars in the paddocks briefly. Everyone had a good look at it through binoculars and one or two through the scope before it quickly moved off west. We could still hear it singing away in the distance.

Stiffkey Fen was to be our final destination. After driving back east, we parked and walked down the permissive path the other side of the road. The meadow here was looking beautiful, peppered with blue flowers, and we watched a couple of Marsh Harriers flying back and forth.

As we got to the copse at the end of the meadow, we  looked back to see a male Marsh Harrier drop down and catch something. We couldn’t see what it was, but we had seen a couple of Brown Hares running back to the spot where it dropped, as it approached. The Hares were still there, looking agitated. The Marsh Harrier flew off out into the middle and dropped down into the reeds.

A minute or so later, a different male Marsh Harrier appeared over the meadow and headed over to where the Hares were, running around and rearing up on their back legs. The Marsh Harrier dropped several times, before it came up with a leveret in its talons. It flew off, chased by one of the Hares on the ground below, disappearing round behind the wood towards the Fen. Nature red in tooth and claw!

There was a small wet flash down in the valley below, a flooded area of grass, and we noticed a small wader on the far side of it. Through the scope, we could see that it was a Wood Sandpiper, one of the scarcer waders which we would hope to come across at this time of year, right at our last stop! We could see its spangled upperparts and pale supercilium.

On the walk out to the Fen, there were lots of insects out in the sunshine. We saw a couple of Four-spotted Chasers, our first dragonflies of the year. Butterflies included Orange Tip and Green-veined White, plus a surprise Painted Lady later up on the seawall, which was also the first of the year. A bee mimic Hoverfly (Volucella bombylans) was also of interest.

Four-spotted Chaser

Four-spotted Chaser – our first dragonfly of the year

We could hear a Greenshank calling as we walked out and just see it over the top of the reeds, on the edge of one of the islands out on the Fen. From up on seawall, we could actually see two Greenshanks, both roosting here over high tide. Otherwise, there were two Little Ringed Plovers, a couple of Redshank and several nesting Avocets.

As we walked along the seawall, a Common Sandpiper flew out from the edge of the channel below us and across to the other side, where we could see it bobbing up and down on the bank. A pair of Common Terns were fishing, diving in the channel, and flew right past us.

Common Tern

Common Tern – a pair were diving in the channel

There were lots of Brent Geese out on the saltmarsh and scattered around the edge of the harbour and we could see a pair of Little Terns flying past over the water. The tide was still coming in, but not far off high now – we could see all the boats going out to look at the seals hauled out on the tip of Blakeney Point in the distance. There were a couple of groups of Oystercatchers roosting around the edges of the harbour and a little party of three Dunlin and three Ringed Plover down on the shore nearest us.

There were a few people walking around the edge of the harbour, out across the saltmarsh, and a dog running around too. They flushed a larger flock of waders from somewhere out of sight, which then whirled round over the water. As it landed, there seemed to be a smaller bird in with them. The birds all dropped down again in the distance, and disappeared amongst the stones on a shingle spit.

As they started to move around, we could see mostly Ringed Plover and Dunlin, plus a couple of Turnstone at first. Then the smaller one reappeared on the near edge of the flock, a Little Stint. We could see its rusty fringed upperparts, short bill and clean white underparts. It was very hard to pick out at first, given the heat haze, but eventually it stopped to preen and everyone managed to get a look at it through the scope.

The great wader selection here was completed with a Whimbrel which unfortunately flushed from the edge of the harbour and flew off before everyone got a chance to see it. Just as we were preparing to leave it flew in again past us and landed on the saltmarsh where we could get it in the scope. Very helpful! A male Marsh Harrier flew in right over our heads too.

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier – this male flew in from the harbour over our heads

It was beautiful out here on the edge of the harbour in the sunshine this afternoon, and with a great selection of birds to look at too. Eventually we had to tear ourselves away and make our way back. As we walked back along the path by the Fen, a Barn Owl flew round the bushes in front of us. It saw us and turned sharply, flying back the way it had come. But when we got back to the car, we could see it hunting over the meadow the other side of the hedge.

That was a great way to end the tour, three enjoyable days with an excellent selection of birds along the coast. However, on our way back we noticed the Peregrine was back on the church tower where we had seen it yesterday, to wave us off.

Peregrine

Peregrine – back on the church tower at the end of the day

18th Nov 2017 – Early Winter Birding, Day 2

Day 2 of a three day long weekend of Early Winter Tours today. It was a nice, bright start to the morning and, although it clouded over later, it stayed largely dry until dark.

As we made our way east along the coast road, we thought we might stop for a better look at the Cattle Egrets. We were looking into the sun and the cows were huddled in one corner of the field, but there appeared to be white shapes in with them as we drove past. We parked in the layby just beyond and crossed the road. A flock of Fieldfares flew across the field, landing in the hedge close to where we parked and started tucking in to the berries. As we walked down along the path, we flushed a couple of Blackbirds and a Song Thrush from the bushes there. A Stock Dove flew out of the game cover as we passed.

When we got down to the corner overlooking the wet grazing marsh where the cows were, we couldn’t see any sign of the Cattle Egrets. The cows were on the edge of a ditch, so we wondered whether the egrets might be hiding at first. While we waited to see if they might emerge, we scanned the pools in the grass. There was a nice selection of ducks – Shelduck, Wigeon, Teal and a single female Pintail with them too. A scattering of Black-tailed Godwits were feeding around the muddy edge.

Marsh HarrierMarsh Harrier – flew over our heads early this morning

A flock of Long-tailed Tits came along the hedge past us, calling noisily. A Marsh Harrier circled up over the trees behind us before flying over our heads. A Yellowhammer flew over the road calling. And it quickly became clear that the Cattle Egrets weren’t there. We would be coming back this way later, so we decided not to linger and headed back to the car.

As we made our way on east past Cley, we could see a small flock of Brent Geese feeding on the grazing marsh by the entrance to Babcock Hide. There was nothing behind us, so we pulled up and had a quick look at them from the car. One immediately stood out – more contrasting than the regular Dark-bellied Brents, blacker bodied with a brighter white flank patch. It was the Black Brant. We managed to get a quick look at it before something spooked the geese and they all took off. They circled round and dropped down onto Watling Water, out of view.

Our next stop was at Weybourne. We decided to have a quick look at the beach first. There were a couple of groups of gulls on the shingle but nothing particularly interesting with them today – a mixture of Herring Gulls and Great Black-backed Gulls. A couple of Lesser Black-backed Gulls flew past together with a Great Black-backed Gull, giving a great side-by-side comparison.

There were several Turnstones down on the beach too, although they should perhaps have been better named Turn-fish today. A large number of small flatfish were washed up after last weekend’s storms and have been providing sustenance for the gulls and the Turnstones.

TurnstoneTurnstone – turning over a flatfish instead!

One of the group spotted a Great Crested Grebe flying past just offshore. It is quite an incongruous sight, but they winter quite commonly on the sea here. A single Ringed Plover flew past some way out too, presumably a fresh arrival coming in for the winter. Two Gannets circled way out on the horizon, catching the sun. A Rock Pipit flew west over the beach along with a Meadow Pipit. Otherwise there was not much happening out at sea this morning, so we decided to explore the fields instead.

As we walked up the hill on the edge of the grass beside the stubble, we flushed several Skylarks which flew round and landed again out in the field. A little group of Meadow Pipits flew up from the grass calling. Then up towards the top of the field, a large flock of Linnets flew up from the stubble and wheeled round before landing again. We had really come to look for Lapland Buntings, a few of which have been in the stubble here in recent days, but at first we couldn’t find any.

As we got up towards the old Coastguard Cottages, we could see more activity out in the middle of the field so we thought we would try walking up along the track towards the mill. We would not be looking into the sun from there too, as we had been from the cliff side. When we got to the field gate half way up the track, we stopped to scan and were instantly rewarded with a Lapland Bunting. Even better, it was out in an open area of bare mud, where we could get it in the scope. Great views – we couldn’t believe our luck! They are more often just seen flying round or skulking in the stubble.

Lapland BuntingLapland Bunting – showed very well on an area of bare mud

We watched the Lapland Bunting for some time. It was strikingly pale, off-white below and around the face. It appeared to be a male, with a ghosting of a black bib. It was feeding with a couple of Skylarks and Linnets. It would disappear into the furrows from time to time and then reappear somewhere different. At one point it looked like it might be bathing in a furrow with a couple of Meadow Pipits. Then a Weasel appeared. It ran across the field to the open muddy area and all the birds started to chase after it, mobbing it.

After the Weasel had been seen off, all the birds flew round and the Lapland Bunting circled over the open area again before heading out across the field. A second Lapland Bunting appeared from somewhere and followed it, the two of them then dropping down into the stubble out of view.

Our next destination was Kelling Water Meadow. As we walked up the lane, there were a few Blackbirds still in the hedges, arrivals from the continent for the winter stopping off here to refuel on the berries. Otherwise, there were just a few Chaffinches on the walk out until we got to where the thick hedges run out. Then a female Stonechat flew up from the grassy verge and landed in a hawthorn beside us.

StonechatStonechat – this female flew up from the verge beside us

There did not appear to be many birds on the pool here today. Three Teal were feeding at the back. One of the things we had hoped to see was the Spotted Redshank which has been lingering here for some months now, but all we could find was a single Common Redshank. A Curlew flew in calling and landed along the muddy edge, followed shortly after by a single Black-tailed Godwit.

The other species we wanted to see here was Jack Snipe, so we made our way round to the area they have been favouring. They are hard to see at the best of times – they sleep most of the day, hiding deep in the grass, beautifully camouflaged. The water level has increased here in recent days too, which also doesn’t help – it seems to have driven them into the thickest vegetation. When one of the group called out almost immediately to say he had found a bird with a long bill walking in the grass on the edge of the water, it seemed too good to be true. It was – a Common Snipe was feeding along the edge of the water. Still, nice to see.

We stood and scanned the grass for a couple of minutes. Then something caught the eye – the vaguest darker shape deep in the grass, and a golden yellow stripe at a different angle to the vegetation. Through the scope we could see it was indeed a Jack Snipe. It was asleep, but we could see its eye staring at us. It half woke at one point, and started to bob up and down a little, the distinctive action of a Jack Snipe.

Jack SnipeJack Snipe – hiding deep in the grass

After enjoying the Jack Snipe for a while, we set off back up the lane. About half way back, we heard Bullfinches calling and a smart pink male flew out of the hedge andup the track ahead of us. It landed in a small tree with some Chaffinches, before flying back towards us and landing in the back of the hedge. We could hear it calling plaintively and a second Bullfinch answering nearby. Then it disappeared round behind the hedge.

We wanted to try to get better views of the Black Brant so we headed back to Cley next. There were only twenty or so Brent Geese off the East Bank, where it had been reported after we had seen it earlier, but it was not with them now. So we headed round to Beach Road instead. There was a much bigger flock of Brent Geese on one of the grazing meadows by the road here and a couple of cars had stopped to look at them. We joined them and after a couple of seconds the Black Brant appeared at the back of the flock.

Black BrantBlack Brant – feeding with the Brent Geese by Beach Road early afternoon

Through the scope, we got a really good look at the Black Brant. The white flank patch was really striking in the sunshine, very different to the more muted patches on the Dark-bellied Brents. When the Black Brant lifted its neck, we could also see its much bolder white collar, complete below the chin.

While we were watching the Black Brant, a small flock of Starlings flew over the reserve towards us, and across the road just beyond us. One of them was strikingly pale brown, but unfortunately it appeared to be just a leucistic Starling rather than anything rarer. Our timing was fortunate, because after a few minutes all the Brent Geese took off and disappeared much further out to the south side of Eye Field to join an even larger flock of Brents already there.

We continued on along Beach Road to the car park at the end and climbed up onto the shingle to have a quick look at the sea. A Grey Seal was swimming past just off the beach. A Red-throated Diver was on the sea rather distant and was diving constantly which made it harder to see. The wind had picked up a little and the sea was rather choppy too. Another Red-throated Diver flew past, along with a couple of distant Guillemots and a single adult Gannet. It was time for lunch, so we ate in the beach shelter out of the fresh breeze.

After lunch, we headed round to the East Bank. There were a few more Brent Geese feeding on the grazing marsh here now, along with several larger flocks of Wigeon. We could see more ducks out on the Serpentine, but as we walked up towards them to have a closer look we noticed a little group of waders feeding on the mud at the north end. One was noticeably smaller than the others, so we hurried straight up there and sure enough it was a Little Stint in with a group of Dunlin.

Little StintLittle Stint – with a larger Dunlin in front

It has been a good year for Little Stints here, with a maximum count of over 40 juveniles earlier in the autumn. However, Little Stint is predominantly a passage migrant here and numbers dwindled through October, as birds moved on towards their wintering grounds around the Mediterranean or to Africa. Winter Little Stints are not unprecedented in Norfolk but are unusual, so it will be interesting to see if this one stays here now. It was a juvenile moulting to 1st winter plumage, still with quite a few retained juvenile scapulars.

As well as the Dunlin and Little Stint, there were a few Black-tailed Godwits feeding down in the water here. There was a nice selection of ducks on the Serpentine too. As well as all the Wigeon and Teal, there were several Shoveler, a small party of Gadwall and a few Pintail, the drakes of which are now looking very smart. Further back, several Cormorants were drying their wings on one of the islands on Pope’s Pool.

A Curlew was feeding on the brackish pools behind the shelter overlooking Arnold’s Marsh, but it was nice to get in the shelter out of the breeze. There didn’t seem to be much out here at first, apart from a number of Common Redshanks, but looking carefully around the edges we found several more Dunlin and three Grey Plover. A Little Egret was fishing on the pool just in front, shaking one foot at a time in the mud out in front of it, trying to flush out some food.

Little EgretLittle Egret – feeding on the pool on the front edge of Arnold’s Marsh

With the evenings drawing in early now and a couple more things we wanted to do yet, we headed back to the car. It turned out that the Cattle Egrets had moved and were in a different field today, which is why we hadn’t found them earlier. This was more than a little unusual – one of them has been coming to the same field just about daily since mid September!

However, we didn’t have any trouble finding the Cattle Egrets now we knew where they were hiding today. We parked outside the pub in Stiffkey and they were out in the field opposite, with the cows. We had a great view of them feeding around the cows hooves, picking at the grass.

Cattle EgretCattle Egret – one of the two still at Stiffkey, but in a different field today!

Our final destination for the day was at Warham Greens. As we walked up the track, we flushed several Blackbirds from the hedge. Then a small group of six Redwings flew out ahead of us too and circled round calling, before landing in the top of the hedge along the edge of one of the fields. A Common Buzzard was surveying the scene from the top of the roof of the old barn and as we walked past several Stock Doves flew out too.

From the end of the track, we stopped and scanned out across the saltmarsh. There were plenty of Little Egrets and Redshanks out in the grass, plus a few Golden Plover and Brent Geese. A Barn Owl flew through the hedge beside us and disappeared away along the edge of the saltmarsh, before landing in the bushes in the Pit.

A large flock of Fieldfares appeared over the hedge, and flew down to the Pit, landing in the tops of all the bushes and it the hedges either side. A little later, more Fieldfares appeared from over the hedge the other side of us, accompanied by a small group of Redwings. It was hard to tell, but perhaps all these thrushes had only just arrived from Scandinavia for the winter and were stopping to feed up here.

It didn’t take long to spot our first Hen Harrier, a cracking grey male which flew across the saltmarsh in front of us. It dropped down into the bushes and almost immediately we picked up a ringtail Hen Harrier which flew up and started quartering the saltmarsh further back. We saw at least 4 possibly 5 Hen Harriers this evening. Another two ringtails appeared together away in front of East Hills. Then a grey male, possibly the same as earlier having sneaked out unseen or possibly a different bird, flew in from the left. It is a real treat to see so many of them.

The light started to go, as a band of dark cloud arrived from the west. We had enjoyed lovely weather all day, which was very welcome, and thankfully only now did it start to spit lightly with rain. We decided to call it a night.

Pink-footed GeesePink-footed Geese – lines and lines of them flew out to roost at dusk

As we walked back up the track, there were several Grey Partridge calling from the fields. We could hear Pink-footed Geese too and looked up to see lines and lines of them in the sky, flying towards us. They were heading out to roost on the flats beyond the saltmarsh and it was really evocative as they flew over our heads. A great way to end the day.

22nd Oct 2017 – Migrants & Winter Visitors Day 3

Day 3 of a three day long weekend of Autumn Migration Tours today, our last day. It was very windy, gusting 40mph+, as ‘Storm Brian’ continued to make its way slowly across the UK. Fortunately it was mostly dry, apart from a brief burst of rain late morning. Nothing to stop us getting out and enjoying a good day.

As we made our way west along the coast road first thing this morning, we stopped briefly along the road at Burnham Overy to have a look at the geese. There were lots of Greylag Geese feeding in the stubble, and several small groups of Pink-footed Geese too. In with them were a good number of Egyptian Geese. More Pink-footed Geese were flying in to join them, but we couldn’t find any sign of anything else yet.

GeeseEgyptian & Greylag Geese – feeding in the stubble at Burnham Overy

Our first destination for the day was the RSPB reserve at Titchwell. As we pulled up in the car park, a tit flock was feeding in the trees just above all the cars. We could see several Long-tailed Tits along with a number of Blue Tits and a Goldcrest. A Chiffchaff was calling nearby. Below the trees, on the curb, a Goldfinch was feeding on the seedheads of a burdock.

GoldfinchGoldfinch – in the car park at Titchwell

It was still relatively quiet, not too many cars, so we had a look around the overflow car park first. As we carefully looked round the corner, there were lots of Chaffinches and Goldfinches feeding on the ground around the edges. Several more finches came down to drink at a puddle in the middle, including two Greenfinches. A Blackcap was feeding in the brambles at the back. As we walked round, we flushed several Blackbirds from the bushes and a couple of Bullfinches flew across in front of us, flashing their square white rump patches, before disappearing into the sallows.

The feeders by the visitor centre held the usual selection of birds – a mixture of Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Goldfinch and tits. We headed out along Fen Trail first this morning. We could hear Long-tailed Tits calling when we arrived at the Meadow Trail junction, so we stopped to listen. A Kingfisher called from the back of the dragonfly pool, but by the time we had got round to the viewing platform it had flown off.

As we walked back to Fen Trail, a flock of Siskins dropped in to the top of the alders. There are still lots of leaves on the trees and we couldn’t see them until they flew off again. The tit flock passed through the trees above our heads, but there didn’t appear to be anything else in with them. It was more sheltered on the tank road and there were more finches in the trees here. As we stopped to look through them, we heard a Yellow-browed Warbler calling, but it was deep in the sallows. As we had already seen several over the last two days, we decided not to stop here to try to see it.

Marsh HarrierMarsh Harrier – one of two enjoying the wind over the reedbed

Round at Patsy’s Reedbed, two Marsh Harriers were enjoying the wind, flying round above the reeds and occasionally circling out over the water. There were a few ducks on here – mostly Mallard, Teal and Shoveler. A lone Tufted Duck was in with them and a Little Grebe was diving out in the middle. Three Common Snipe were feeding or bathing along the edge.

Continuing on towards the Autumn Trail, we flushed several more Blackbirds and a couple of Song Thrushes from the hedges. There was no sign of the Little Owl here though – it was very windy and it was probably very sensibly tucked up somewhere more sheltered. But as we turned the corner by Willow Wood, we looked across the reedbed and spotted a Bittern flying over. We watched it as it flew across and dropped down into the reeds beyond the end of the line of dead trees.

BitternBittern – flew over the reedbed as we walked round to Autumn Trail

It was very exposed out on the end of Autumn Trail, and the wind was whistling in. We could see two Spotted Redshanks out with lots of ducks roosting over by the fence at the back of Avocet Island, but all the birds were very flighty in the wind. We turned to see some very dark clouds approaching from the west, so we didn’t linger here and beat a hasty retreat.

We made our way round via Meadow Trail to the main path. There had been a Water Pipit earlier on the Thornham grazing marsh ‘pool’, but we couldn’t see it. It was very gusty here and starting to spit with drizzle, so we didn’t look very thoroughly, figuring we could have another look later. We headed along to Island Hide, where we could get out of the wind. As we walked along the path past the reedbed, several flocks of waders flew past, presumably heading off inland to feed in the stubble fields. They were mostly Black-tailed Godwit and Ruff, but three Turnstones flew past with them too.

Our timing was good, because we hadn’t been in Island Hide long, before it started to rain. There were plenty of birds on here to look through, to keep us busy, though with the blustery SW wind the water was mostly over the far side and the mud in front of the hide was comparatively dry. There seemed to be quite a few Dunlin when we arrived, in several small flocks scattered around the islands, but numbers appeared to be thinning as birds flew off to feed elsewhere. We quickly located one of the Little Stints out on the mud and had a good look at it through the scope, but it was rather mobile.

Little StintLittle Stint – one of the juveniles on the Freshmarsh

There were still a few Black-tailed Godwits and Ruff around one of the islands and a lone Avocet was feeding in the deeper water towards the back. Most of the Avocets have headed off south for the winter already, but there are typically a handful which attempt to stay here, depending on the weather. A single Turnstone and a Grey Plover dropped in briefly.

Thankfully it stopped raining fairly quickly and we took advantage of it to walk round to Parrinder Hide. There was a better view of all the ducks from here – Teal, Wigeon, Shoveler and Gadwall. We got a smart drake Gadwall in the scope and admired its intricately patterned plumage. The most underrated of ducks! The drake Teal in front of the hide were all in various stages of moult, some still mostly in duller eclipse plumage but one or two already back to smart breeding attire.

TealTeal – a smart drake, already moulted back out of eclipse plumage

One of the volunteers had seen what might have been a Water Pipit in the vegetation on one of the islands in front of Parrinder Hide earlier, when looking across from Island Hide. We had a good look but there was no sign of it from here – just a couple of Pied Wagtails and Linnets.

The other side of Parrinder Hide, overlooking the Volunteer Marsh, seemed to be filled mostly with people huddled behind the glass windows eating their sandwiches. This was a shame, as there was a lovely close Bar-tailed Godwit feeding right below the front of the hide. We opened one of the windows, to disapproving grumbles from the picnickers, and had a good look at it. It was a juvenile, its upperparts very strongly  patterned with thick blackish feather centres.

Bar-tailed GodwitBar-tailed Godwit – on the Volunteer Marsh right below the hide

Even better, there was a Black-tailed Godwit right next to it, giving us a great opportunity to compare the two. The Bar-tailed Godwit was noticeably smaller and shorter legged, with a slight upturn to its bill. The Black-tailed Godwit was an adult in non-breeding plumage, and was noticeably duller, greyer with no obvious patterning to the feathers of it upperparts, very different in appearance from the Bar-tailed Godwit.

Black-tailed GodwitBlack-tailed Godwit – a nice comparison, next to the Bar-tailed Godwit

There was a fairly close Curlew here too, which had found a sheltered spot behind a tussock of grass to stand and preen. We had a look at that through the scope too, admiring its intricately patterned plumage. We could also see a few Grey Plover and  Redshank out on the mud. A large flock of Linnets flew across in front of the hide.

It was already just about time for lunch, so we made our way back towards the Visitor Centre. On the way, we had a quick look for the Water Pipit on the Thornham grazing marsh pool, but it was still hard going looking into the wind and we couldn’t see it. We found a sheltered picnic table in the trees for lunch.

After lunch, we decided to head back out to the beach. It had stopped spitting with rain, even if it was still rather windy, so we had a proper look out at the grazing marsh pool this time. With a bit more effort, we found the Water Pipit, sheltering from the wind behind a clump of rushes. We could see its pale supercilium and wingbar, and rather pale white ground colour to the underparts with black streaks on the breast.

As we passed the Volunteer Marsh, there was a nice close Redshank feeding just below the path. As usual, there were a lot more waders on the muddy channel at the far end – several Ringed Plover and Dunlin, a Grey Plover, plus more Black-tailed Godwits, Redshank and Curlew.

RedshankRedshank – feeding by the main path

It was rather exposed and windy out at the Tidal Pools, where a Little Grebe was diving next to the path and several more Black-tailed Godwits were feeding around the islands. We made our way quickly on to the beach, where we could get some shelter from the wind on the other side of the dunes.

A quick scan of the sea revealed a single Common Scoter close inshore, just off the beach. Two more Common Scoter were a bit further out and harder to see in the swell, along with three Great Crested Grebes. A couple of Gannets were circling offshore and diving for fish.

There was a nice selection of waders on the beach – Oystercatchers and Bar-tailed Godwits. A couple of Sanderlings dropped in briefly on the sand. There were more waders on the mussel beds – a nice little group right on the near end where they were easier to see included a single Knot, with two Grey Plover, a Redshank and a Turnstone.

As we started to head back, a female Stonechat flew across the path in front of us. We stopped to watch here feeding, flicking out from the Suaeda bushes in the lee of the bank to look for insects on the edge of the dunes. Then it was heads down, as we walked back into the wind.

StonechatStonechat – feeding on the edge of the dunes on our way back

Once we got back to the car, we drove round to Thornham Harbour. It was windswept here, with lots of disturbance from Sunday afternoon walkers. We had a quick look in the harbour channel, which held singles each of Bar-tailed Godwit, Black-tailed Godwit, Curlew, Redshank and Grey Plover. But there was a distinct lack of small birds here today, in the wind. As we turned to leave, a quick glance up the channel behind the old coal barn revealed a single Spotted Redshank hunched up on the rocks, facing into the wind.

We headed inland and up to Choseley next.  The first field we looked in had two Marsh Harriers, just standing around out in the middle. A little further up, another field was scattered with small brown lumps. When we stopped to look more closely, we could see it was liberally sprinkled with Golden Plovers. A small group of Curlews was feeding closer to the road and further over was a big mob of Starlings probing in the green winter wheat too.

The cover strip alongside the road has been very productive in recent weeks, but it was windy up here today and there were no birds in the seedy vegetation. A flock of Black-headed and Common Gulls was feeding in the winter wheat beyond. As we drove on, we saw several coveys of Red-legged Partridges and lots of Brown Hares in the fields.

It was time to start making our way back, but on the way we decided to make a quick stop back at Burnham Overy to look at the geese. Unfortunately, there were a lot fewer geese in the first field we checked, where a man was now walking his dogs. In the next field along, we found a few Greylags, Pink-footed and Egyptian Geese, but nothing else of note with them. Several skeins of Pink-footed Geese flew over, heading to the fields inland to gather before going off to roost.

Unfortunately, it was time for us to go now too. It had been another exciting three days of Autumn birding, with a very good selection of birds seen.

21st Oct 2017 – Migrants & Winter Visitors Day 2

Day 2 of a three day long weekend of Autumn Migration Tours today. It was a nice bright start to the day, but the wind increased during the morning as ‘Storm Brian’ swept across the UK. Thankfully, being on the east coast, it was nowhere near as windy here as it was in the west of the country, but it was still rather gusty at times. It clouded over a bit too, in the afternoon, but remained dry all day and we had a good day out.

Given the nice weather first thing, we decided to have a quick look in Wells Woods to see if any migrants had arrived overnight. There are lots of Little Grebes now on the boating lake – we counted at least 17 as we walked past – but no ducks other than the local Mallards.

Little GrebeLittle Grebe – one of at least 17 on the boating lake today

We set off into the woods but it was quiet at first in the trees. We could hear Long-tailed Tits calling further over, towards the east side of the Dell. On our way round there, a Treecreeper flew in and landed on the trunk of a large old pine tree in front of us. We watched it for a minute or so as it picked its way around the furrows in the bark, before it disappeared round the other side of the tree.

TreecreeperTreecreeper – flew in to the trunk of an old pine tree in front of us

At first we could only find three Long-tailed Tits together. They were calling constantly and had possibly lost the rest of the flock. They disappeared off the way we had come, but as we walked out onto the main path, we found the rest of the group. They were in a sheltered spot initially, but quickly moved round to the breezier side of the trees where they were harder to follow.

The tit flock was on the move, and didn’t seem to know which was they were going, They first started to head over to the caravan site, then changed their minds and went back to the edge of the Dell, before starting to fly over to the west side of the meadow. There was a nice selection of the commoner tits and a few Goldcrests, but it was hard to see the whole flock. In the end, they disappeared into the trees and we left them to it.

The bushes in the more open areas by the track still held a few thrushes – several Blackbirds and a Redwing or two – plus a handful of Chaffinches, but not the number of migrants that they have produced in the last few days. It seemed like there had not been much in the way of new birds in overnight, and earlier arrivals had already mostly moved off inland. A Bullfinch flew out of the brambles and away ahead of us, flashing its white rump. There were a few Curlews in the nearer fields, and we could see small flocks of Pink-footed Geese dropping into the fields further south.

The drinking pool seemed like a good place to check, as it would be relatively sheltered. As we walked in, we could hear Long-tailed Tits calling in the pines beyond, but it took us a while to locate them. Thankfully, they worked their way round to the pool and many of them dropped down into the smaller trees round the edge. We had great views of the tits and in particular a couple of Goldcrests which were feeding low down right in front of us.

GoldcrestGoldcrest – one of several feeding in the bushes round the drinking pool

As the tit flock moved back up into the pines, we decided to make our way back and try our luck elsewhere. The wind had already started to pick up now, and we really noticed it as we got out of the trees. When we got back to the car, we headed off east along the coast to Cley.

There has been a Black Redstart hanging around here for a few days now and today it had taken up residence on the roof of the wardens house. As we walked out to the hides, we could see it flitting around on the tiles. The sun was on the east side of the roof, which was also most sheltered from the wind. Presumably it was finding insects up there because, as well as the Black Redstart, there were also two Pied Wagtails on the roof.

Black RedstartBlack Redstart – on the roof of the warden’s house at Cley

Black Redstarts breed in small numbers in Norfolk, mainly around Great Yarmouth. This one is presumably a migrant, heading from the breeding grounds in northern Europe to winter around the Mediterranean.

The boardwalk out to the hides was also in the sun, and sheltered from the wind by the tall reeds either side. There were lots of Common Darter dragonflies along here, basking in the sunshine on the bare wood.

Common DarterCommon Darter – basking in the sun along the boardwalk

At the end of the boardwalk, we headed for Dauke’s Hide first. There were lots of ducks out on Simmond’s Scrape – mainly Wigeon and Teal, now returned in larger numbers from Russia and northern Europe for the winter. They were very jump in the wind, and kept flying up into the air, taking everything else up with them, before landing again.

There have been good numbers of Little Stints at Cley this autumn and the same was still true today. There were at least 7 on Simmond’s Scrape while we were there, although they were hard to count. They really are tiny birds and were easily lost from view among the ducks or around the back edges of the islands. They were all juveniles – amazing to think they are making their way unguided from the Arctic down to Africa for the winter.

Little StintLittle Stint – a juvenile, one of at least 7 on Simmond’s Scrape

There were not so many other waders on here this morning. This might be partly due to the ducks, which caused them all to take flight several times when we were there, not helped by the two Marsh Harriers which were quartering over the reeds most of the time but would occasionally drift over the edges of the scrapes, presumably enjoying the mayhen which ensued.

There were three Black-tailed Godwits feeding in the deeper water along the edge of the scrape, and a couple of Ruff in among the ducks. A little group of Dunlin included some already in winter plumage and a couple of juveniles with black spotted bellies. A lone adult was still sporting most of its large black belly patch, a remnant from its breeding plumage. A single Common Snipe flew in and landed in the cut dead reeds in the back corner, where it immediately became very difficult to see!

There had been a Curlew Sandpiper reported here earlier, but we couldn’t find it – presumably it had flown off at some point, when all the ducks flushed. We did find a Ringed Plover out on the grass in the middle of one of the islands. When something else landed with it, we looked over and were surprised to see a dumpy, much darker wader – a Purple Sandpiper.

Through the scope, we could see the Purple Sandpiper’s yellow legs and bill base. It was a first winter bird, still with its retained pale-fringed juvenile wing coverts. It stayed just long enough for us all to get a good look at it through the scope. Then suddenly all the ducks erupted again, as the Marsh Harrier drifted across the back of the scrapes, and the waders took to the air too. Unfortunately, despite most of the birds quickly returning to the water, the Purple Sandpiper had disappeared.

One of the smartest birds on here today was a Starling. We don’t tend to look at them as much as we should, as they are not uncommon here especially in winter, but this one was probing in the grass for invertebrates, on the bank right in front of the hide, and demanded our attention. It looked particularly striking in its fresh plumage, with striking white or pale brown tips to the feathers head and body feathers. A real stunner!

StarlingStarling – feeding in the grass in front of the hide, a stunning bird close-up

There are not so many birds on Pat’s Pool at the moment, but we popped into Teal Hide for a quick look. The highlight was a single Avocet in a line of roosting Black-headed Gulls and Ruff. Most of the Avocets here have left already, but there are still a very few hanging on along the coast. There seem to be fewer than recent years, so perhaps they know something we don’t about the coming winter!

The Ruff here today were mainly juveniles, faded now to a variety of pale, buff, stone, ecru underparts. A single winter adult with them was much paler, whitish below, and with obvious bright orange legs and bill base.

AvocetAvocet & friends – with a few Ruff and Black-headed Gulls

Then it was back to the visitor centre for lunch. It was rather windy now, but not enough to stop us from making the use of the picnic tables and enjoying the view across the reserve.

After lunch, we made our way round to the beach car park. As soon as we got out of the car, we could see a small group of Brent Geese in the Eye Field. There was a Black Brant here a couple of days ago and a quick glance through the flock revealed an obviously different bird – much darker, blackish bodied, than the accompanying Dark-bellied Brents, with a brighter, cleaner white flank patch. A smart Black Brant.

Black BrantBlack Brant – with the Brent Geese in the Eye Field

This was our second Black Brant in two days, presumably another returning individual, which has got attached to a group of Dark-bellied Brents in Siberia and now remains with them all year, migrating back and forth to Norfolk. It didn’t appear to have such a strongly marked neck collar as yesterday’s Black Brant at first, but it was feeding and hunkered down against the wind. When it lifted its head, the extensive neck collar, connecting under the chin and almost joining at the back of the neck, was more obvious.

There had been several Gannets circling offshore earlier, we had seen them distantly from the hides before lunch, so we had a quick look out to sea. Unfortunately they had moved further offshore or along towards Salthouse now – we could still see them, a mixture of black-tipped white-winged adults, dusky grey juveniles and some in betweens. Otherwise, there was not much happening out to sea, no wildfowl moving today. We did see a few distant auks, Guillemots and Razorbills, flying past.

To finish off our visit to the reserve at Cley today, we headed round to the East Bank to head out to Arnold’s Marsh. It was rather windy up on the East Bank, but the wind was at our backs on the walk out. We could just about hear the Bearded Tits calling at the back of Don’s Pool, but it was not the day to be looking for them today – Bearded Tits don’t like the wind, and typically remain tucked deep down in the reedbed on days like today.

There was a good smattering of ducks out on the grazing marshes to the east as we walked out, mostly Wigeon and Teal. Looking through more carefully, we found a few Pintail asleep in the grass and a few Gadwall too. Several juvenile Ruff were feeding on the mud at the north end of the Serpentine.

We took shelter from the wind in the shelter overlooking Arnold’s Marsh. There was a nice selection of waders out on the water here, mostly Black-tailed Godwits and Redshanks along with several Curlew. Around the edges and the islands we found three Ringed Plovers and two Grey Plovers. Then it was a brisk walk back into the wind!

For our final stop, we finished the day with a visit to Kelling Water Meadow. As we walked up along the lane, we could hear a Chiffchaff calling from deep in the hedge. Several Blackbirds flushed ahead of us from where they were feeding on the berries, as we saw this morning, probably birds lingering having arrived over the last couple of days.

There had been a Yellow-browed Warbler reported from the copse here earlier and we arrived to find a small crowd leaving. We were told it had been in the hedge on the sheltered north side and after only a minute or so it appeared among the leaves. It flitted about for a while, long enough for us to get a good look at it, before it disappeared back into the trees as a flock of tits moved through.

Continuing on down to the Water Meadow, we stopped at the gate on the cross track and looked back over the pool. Three small waders on the mud were the three lingering juvenile Curlew Sandpipers, so we had a good look at those through the scope. A little bigger and sleaker than a Dunlin, with a longer, more downcurved and Curlew-like bill, cleaner white and buff below with delicately scaled upperparts. They have been around here for a while now, stopping off to feed on their way down from the breeding grounds in central Siberia to Africa for the winter. Presumably they will be on their way again sometime soon.

Further back, in the most distant corner of the pool, we could see a couple of larger waders and through the scope, we could see that they were two Spotted Redshanks. These birds have been lingering here for several weeks now too. Like the Curlew Sandpipers, they are both young birds, reared in the Arctic in the summer and now making their way south. There were a couple of Common Snipe feeding with them, but there was another Common Snipe closer, on the edge of the island, which we got a better look at. There have been one or two Jack Snipe here in recent days, but we couldn’t find them today.

Spotted RedshankSpotted Redshanks – gave great close views after everyone else had gone

One of the Spotted Redshanks is much paler than the other – the paler one is more advanced in its moult, with more silvery grey moulted first winter feathers in its mantle and scapulars. The second bird is now starting to moult and we could see a smattering of new feathers here, but it still appears rather dusky by comparison.

There were a few other birds here too, while we stood and watched the waders. A Fieldfare flew past behind us and we caught it as it continued on west, over the hill and into the sun, the only one of the weekend. A flock of Linnets flew across the Quags calling and a Stonechat zipped across and disappeared over the hedge.

The Spotted Redshanks made their way along the east side of the pool and down towards the top corner, so we made our way along behind the reeds and were soon treated to great close-up views of them as they fed just a few metres away from us. We could see their long, needle-fine bills, with a slight kink at the tip. They were feeding busily, in and out of the grass around the edge of the pool.

Then it was time to head back. The nights are drawing in now and the light was already starting to fade as we wended our way along the coast road to finish the day.