Monthly Archives: September 2018

10th Sept 2018 – Coastal Birding, Day 1

Day 1 of a two day Private Tour today in North Norfolk, for a visitor from Canada. The brief was to look for common birds too, not just scarcer species, so we set off to see how many birds we could find. It was cloudy, and cool on the coast in a fresh breeze, but thankfully it stayed mostly dry.

Our first destination was Titchwell. When we arrived, the main car park was only half full but there were already a couple of people walking round the overflow car park, looking in the bushes. We had a slow walk round too. It was quiet initially but as we stood and waited quietly a few more birds began to appear out of the undergrowth.

There were lots of finches in the tops of the trees, mainly Goldfinches and Greenfinches. We found several Blackcaps feeding on the elderberries, although a brief Garden Warbler was less accommodating and disappeared into the brambles. As well as several Blackbirds, a single Song Thrush was rather elusive too.

Blackcap

Blackcap – a male feeding on berries in the car park

There was nothing visible in the paddocks from the gate at the end, but while we were scanning we spotted a large flock of Golden Plover flying over the hillside beyond. The birds split up into several smaller groups and one came in over the paddocks and headed out onto the reserve.

We made our way down past the visitor centre and out along the main path. Our first stop was at the reedbed pool. There were a couple of Little Grebes diving out towards the back and one or two Coot, but not many ducks on here today. We could hear Bearded Tits calling out in the reeds, but they were keeping their heads down given the wind. Two Greenshank flew in calling and circled round over the water looking for somewhere to land.

As we walked on, looking towards the Freshmarsh we could see five Spoonbills hiding at the back. We stopped for a quick look, because we knew they would not be visible from the hides. Approaching Island Hide, we heard a Water Rail squealing down in the reeds below the path and looked down to see it chase a Moorhen out onto the open mud. We watched the Water Rail picking its way in and out of the reeds. We could still see it on the edge of the reeds when we got into the hide.

Looking out across the mud, two juvenile Curlew Sandpipers were feeding on the edge of the water. They were joined by a single juvenile Dunlin, given a nice comparison alongside, the latter with black spotting on its belly, the Curlew Sandpipers a little larger and with slightly longer bills. There were more Curlew Sandpipers further over, all juveniles, taking us to five in total.

A much smaller wader over on the edge of the reeds below the main path was a juvenile Little Stint. It was loosely associating with a larger flock of around 40 Dunlin scattered over the mud on that side. All the small waders were very nervous and kept taking off and whirling round.

There are still lots of Ruff out on the Freshmarsh, with all the adults now in their dull grey-brown non-breeding plumage. We could see lots of Black-tailed Godwits too, but they were mostly feeding in the deeper water right in the back corner. There is still a scattering of Avocets here but numbers have dropped significantly from the highs of late summer, as birds have headed off for the winter.

Ruff

Ruff – an adult in non-breeding plumage

Two geese on one of the islands were the resident Pink-footed Geese. They both have badly damaged wings, possibly having been shot, and were unable to make the journey to Iceland for the breeding season, but they seem to have survived quite happily here over the summer.

There are lots more ducks in now, as birds return for the winter – Teal, Shoveler, Wigeon, Gadwall – but they are mostly in their dull eclipse plumage at the moment. Most of the remaining Shelduck are juveniles, as the adults have gone off to moult.

From up on the main path, we had a much better view of the Little Stint. It was feeding on the mud just below, almost too close as it kept disappearing behind the reeds just below us! It was clearly much smaller than all the Dunlin, whiter below, with a short bill and two bright pale lines down the mantle.

Little Stint

Little Stint – a juvenile, close to the main path today

We had seen a single Curlew Sandpiper with the Dunlin here too, from the hide, but we couldn’t see it at first. Presumably it had been hiding behind the reeds too, as suddenly it appeared again just below the path. We got a great close look at that as well.

Curlew Sandpiper

Curlew Sandpiper – one of five juveniles this morning

We were already doing well for waders here. Then a Common Snipe appeared out of the vegetation on the island between the path and Parrinder Hide and proceeded to probe its long bill vigorously in the mud. A single Knot flew in and landed on the far side of the same island, along the muddy shore.

Two Spoonbills flew up from the back of the Freshmarsh and flew straight towards us, before seeing all the people on the bank and veering away over the corner of Volunteer Marsh. Just as they flew off, another three Spoonbills flew in from behind us, from out over Thornham saltmarsh. They flew straight past us, giving us great close-up flight views.

Spoonbills

Spoonbills – several were coming and going this morning

While we were watching all the comings and goings on the Freshmarsh, we heard Bearded Tits calling below us in the reeds. We looked down to see a small bird with a long tail dart across over the water in the corner. We had a couple more glimpses of them, but they were keeping hidden, out of the wind today. We did get better views of one or two Reed Warblers which were also flitting around low down along the edge of the reeds and a Reed Bunting which perched up more obligingly.

When we got to Parrinder Hide, we had a quick look from outside the hide first. We were instantly rewarded with two Spotted Redshanks, roosting at the back of the Freshmarsh with some Black-tailed Godwits. We got the Spotted Redshanks in the scope, first an adult in silvery-grey and white winter plumage and then a much duskier moulting juvenile. We could see their long and needle fine bills, very different from a Common Redshank.

As we scanned the Freshmarsh from inside the hide, a Common Sandpiper flew across in front of us, calling, and landed on the muddy edge out to one side. Further back, we could see a juvenile Little Ringed Plover on the mud too. It ran out along the edge of the island, where it was joined by a second Little Ringed Plover, also a juvenile. The two of them were then chased off by two Ringed Plovers, which at least gave us a great opportunity to compare the two species!

Little Ringed Plover

Little Ringed Plover – a juvenile from Parrinder Hide

A quick look out from the other side of Parrinder Hide produced a smart Grey Plover still in breeding plumage, and several Curlew and Common Redshank. Back on the main path, there were more waders along the muddy channel at the far end of Volunteer Marsh – lots more Redshank, and Black-tailed Godwits, and two more Grey Plover, this time mostly in non-breeding attire.

The Tidal Pools were rather quiet today, so we made our way straight out to the beach. The tide was out now and there were lots of waders down on the mussel beds. Bar-tailed Godwit was a particularly target and we spotted some down on the beach, so we walked down for a closer look. There were 4-5 Bar-tailed Godwits out on the sand and several with the more numerous Black-tailed Godwits on the mussel beds, including one still sporting rather rusty underpart, the remnants of its breeding plumage.

A single Whimbrel was feeding with all the Curlew on the mussel beds. Through the scope, we could see its short bill and striped crown. There were several Turnstones, very well camouflaged against the dark mud and shellfish, and a few more Knot too.

A Sanderling flew in along the beach but landed out of view. We walked further down to try to see where it had landed, but when we got there we couldn’t find it. At that point, all the waders suddenly started to take off and we looked up to see a juvenile Peregrine buzzing the birds on the beach before following the flocks out over the sea. All the waders flushed and flocks of Knot and Oystercatchers came right past us.

Knot

Knot – flushed by a Peregrine off the beach

The Peregrine turned and came in again, low over the waves. This time it had lost the benefit of surprise and it didn’t look like catching anything. It drifted away towards Brancaster.

We looked out over the sea and saw another dark bird low over the waves. This time it was an Arctic Skua. It had seen a Sandwich Tern flying past, and was heading straight for it, hoping to steal its lunch!  The Arctic Skua chased the Tern for a few seconds, the two of them twisting and turning in a dogfight, before it seemed to lose interest and flew off. A little late, a second Arctic Skua flew past us. Then a Mediterranean Gull flew past along the shoreline, a young bird, in its first winter. It was all action down at the beach!

Arctic Skua

Arctic Skua – two were lingering offshore, chasing the terns

It was time to start thinking about heading back for lunch, so we walked back up the beach. We spotted a Marsh Harrier drifting inland over the Tidal Pools, the first we had seen this morning. From the top of the beach, we could see another two Marsh Harriers coming in off the sea. They looked like they might be migrants from the continent arriving for the winter, but one of them was a juvenile bearing green wing tags. It had been ringed at Holkham a few months earlier, so that individual was certainly a local bird.

A Little Egret battling its way in over the sea from further out presumably was a migrant arriving, as was a single Pintail flying west offshore. Two drake Common Scoters were out on the sea.

We had been distracted with all the activity, and we were now starting to get hungry, so we made our way back. We stopped briefly to watch a Little Egret fishing on Volunteer Marsh, where the water was still slowing out of the channel. A Cetti’s Warbler was singing in the reedbed as we passed, but well hidden from view as ever.

Little Egret

Little Egret – feeding on Volunteer Marsh as the tide dropped

After lunch, we headed out along Fen Trail. Just past the Visitor Centre, we came across a flock of Long-tailed Tits in the sallows. We stopped to watch for a minute or so, and found various other birds with them – Blue Tits and Great Tits, several Chiffchaff and a Goldcrest.

We stopped at the gate on the Tank Road to scan the paddocks. There was nothing out on the grass but we could see two doves on the roof of one of the stables – two Turtle Doves. Through the scope, we could see their pink-washed breasts, black and white-striped neck patches and, as they turned, their rusty fringed upperparts.

Patsy’ Reedbed is a great place for ducks at the moment. As well as all the commonr dabbling ducks we had seen earlier on the Freshmarsh, there were several Common Pochard and Tufted Ducks here. Two female Red-crested Pochard were upending out in the middle.

The Great White Egret we were told was hiding in the reeds, but it wasn’t long before it strode out into the middle, where we got a great look at it. It flew round a couple of times too, so we could really appreciate its large size.

Great White Egret

Great White Egret – showed very well on Patsy’s Reedbed

Continuing on along East Trail, a large flock of House Martins were hawking for insects over the edge of Patsy’s Reedbed. In with them, we found one or two Sand Martins as well, browner backed and lacking the white rump of the House Martins. The Turtle Doves were now down in the paddocks, around one of the water troughs, and had drawn a small crowd of admirers.

Turtle Doves

Turtle Dove – these two were around the paddocks this afternoon

We had a quick look up along the Autumn Trail to the end. We could hear more Bearded Tits calling but once again they refused to show themselves. There were several browner juvenile Ruffs in the far corner of the Freshmarsh too. Then we made our way quickly back to the car.

By the time we got to Holme, the clouds had darkened and the wind had picked up. A Stock Dove was feeding in the grass in the fields by the track. We walked along the coast path behind the paddocks, but the bushes here were very quiet today, apart from a few House Sparrows. It seemed like there had been a clear-out of our summer warblers over the last day or so and no migrants fresh in.

The dunes the other side were quiet at first two, not helped by several dogs running around on the loose. We eventually managed to find a group of three juvenile Stonechats, accompanied by a Common Whitethroat. A Common Buzzard was perched on some brambles out in the middle of the grazing marsh.

With a lack of small birds in the bushes, we decided not to press on further. On our way back, we stopped to have a look at the Beach. A family of five Common Terns were out on the sand, in the distance. Scanning through the waders on the beach, as well as the species we had seen at Titchwell, we managed to find a group of Sanderlings to make up for the elusive one earlier. A Gannet drifted past in the distance offshore.

Red-legged Partridge

Red-legged Partridge – posing next to the road

It was time to be heading home, but we made our way back via the smaller roads inland. We had hoped to find a few farmland birds, but the bushes were quiet in the wind. A Red-legged Partridge posed nicely for the cameras on the verge, and we found one field over which a large flock Swallows was hawking for insects.

When we looked at the total for the day, we found we had seen or heard 99 species, including 23 different types of wader. Not a bad start – lets see how many more we can find tomorrow!

4th Sep 2018 – Migrants & More, Day 2

Day 2 of a two day Private Tour up on the North Norfolk coast today. It was a different day to yesterday, cloudy all day with a fresh N wind off the Continent, which brought with it the promise of arriving migrants.

This time we made our way east along the coast. We made a quick stop at Stiffkey first. As we got out of the car, several House Martins and Swallows were hawking for insects over the trees, presumably fuelling up before heading off. We wanted to have a walk through the coastal bushes to see if anything had arrived overnight. A couple of other people had the same idea, so we agreed to keep in touch and let each other know if there was anything about.

Several Curlews and Redshanks flew up from the saltmarsh as we passed. Some small flocks of Golden Plover wheeled round further out, calling plaintively. We could hear a Greenshank too and a rasping call alerted us to a Snipe flying overhead. There were a few Little Egrets out on the saltmarsh too.

A Marsh Harrier was quartering the cordgrass beds out towards the beach and a second bird flew across the saltmarsh closer to us, flushing all the waders from the grass as it did so. A Peregrine was perched out on a sandbank in the distance – we got a better view of it through the scope.

We walked out as far as the whirligig and had a good look in the bushes, but it all seemed very quiet. We only heard a single Blackcap calling from deep in the hawthorns here. It appeared that not only had there been no new arrivals overnight but that a lot of the birds which had been here had decided to move on. We received messages to say that neither of the other two people here had seen anything so we decided to head back to the car and try something different.

Carrying on along the coast to Cley, we walked out to the hides to see if we could find any waders. We called in to Avocet Hide first. There were several ducks feeding right in front of the hide – Teal and Shoveler.

Shoveler

Shoveler – feeding right in front of Avocet Hide

There were not many waders on this scrape at first sight, but scanning carefully we found a couple of Little Ringed Plover at the back of the main island. A Green Sandpiper was calling, and following the sound, we found it hiding in the cut reeds on the far corner of the same island. A Common Snipe crept into the cut reeds in front of it and melted away into the vegetation.

Our next stop was going to be in Dauke’s Hide, but we couldn’t resist a quick look over from here at Simmond’s Scrape next door. There seemed to be more waders on there, lots of Ruff and quite a few Dunlin in particular. We found a juvenile Spotted Redshank asleep with the ducks and an Avocet on the front of the closest island. We got the scope on it and could see its dusky grey overall colouration, spotted on the wings with silvery white dots, and even though it was asleep we could see its white brow back to the eye.

Wigeon and Dunlin

Wigeon & Dunlin – spooked from Simmond’s Scrape

Then most of the birds on the scrape took off – all the Ruff and Dunlin and most of the ducks too. They whirled round over the reeds and scrapes – a small group of Wigeon flew round in front of us, with a couple of Dunlin for company. Most of the waders flew off, but the ducks returned. The Spotted Redshank woke up briefly, flashed its long, fine bill, and went back to sleep!

We found out what the culprit was – a Marsh Harrier had drifted over from the reedbed at the back, an adult male. It disappeared off over Cricket Marsh. A short while later, a juvenile Marsh Harrier did exactly the same thing, scattering everything again.

Marsh Harrier

Marsh Harrier – the juvenile, spooking all the birds on Simmond’s Scrape

With most of the waders gone from Simmond’s Scrape now, we decided to head round to have a look at Pat’s Pool next instead. The water level on here has gone up in the last few days – presumably they have let some more water on. Consequently, there weren’t many waders on here either. There were just some Ruff, presumably some of them come over from Simmond’s, and a few Lapwings.

While we scanned round the scrape, we kept one eye on Simmond’s to see if the waders might return, but only a few Ruff and four of the Dunlin drifted back in. A single Pintail was notable amongst the commoner ducks. We had a quick look in at Dauke’s Hide anyway, adding a Black-tailed Godwit feeding in deeper water in the far corner to the day’s list. The Spotted Redshank was still asleep! We decided to head round to the East Bank next.

It was a bit breezy up on the bank. We could hear Bearded Tits calling from the reeds, but they were keeping well tucked down today. There were quite a few Meadow Pipits chasing each other round the grazing meadow the other side and we heard a Skylark too.

There were quite a few waders out on Pope’s Pool – mostly Ruff, probably including some which had flown here when they were flushed from Simmond’s Scrape. There was a Common Sandpiper too, and several Common Snipe, but there was a surprising amount of shimmer in the air which made it hard to make out any detail at that range. Thankfully, we found another Common Sandpiper feeding along the edge of the Serpentine, which was much easier to see.

We had a quick look in the main drain as we passed, but there was no sign of the Otter. Just a rather distant Little Grebe diving in the channel. So we carried straight on to the shelter overlooking Arnold’s Marsh.

There were lots of birds on Arnold’s – a large flock of waders and another of Sandwich Terns. Through the scope, we could see the waders were mainly Black-tailed Godwits and Redshank. In amongst them were several much smaller Dunlin and four Ringed Plovers. A small party of Curlews were roosting in the vegetation off to one side. This was where most of the waders were now hiding!

The Black-tailed Godwits were already starting to drift off back towards the reserve, in small groups, when everything erupted. We looked up to see two Hobbys shooting across the sky, one following after the other. Having sown pandemonium, they gained height and then one of them set off at speed after a Dunlin, chasing it off over Pope’s Pool, followed by the second. The Dunlin was too quick for them – they had lost the element of surprise – and the two Hobbys gave up, flying off over the reedbed towards the reserve.

Sandwich Terns

Sandwich Terns & Black-tailed Godwits – spooked by a pair of Hobbys

Most of the waders settled quickly back down again on Arnold’s, but some headed off back towards the reserve too. We stopped to scan through them again and about five minutes later, the Hobbys were back for another go, putting everything up again, but powering straight on through without stopping.

A distant flock of ducks caught our eye, coming in over the sea just beyond the shingle ridge. There were about forty of them, mostly Wigeon but with a few Teal mixed in, fresh arrivals from the Continent coming here for the winter, migration in action! With a moderate north wind, there had been some seabirds seen along the coast too this morning, so we thought we would have a quick look. We headed out to the beach.

As we got out to the shingle ridge, another group of six Wigeon flew past above us and four more Teal came in low over the sea. Several of the Sandwich Terns were now fishing just offshore and further out, we picked up some larger white birds flying past over the sea, Gannets. There was a steady trickle of Gannets past as we stood on the beach, and a single Fulmar. We also spotted a couple of distant groups of Common Scoter flying past, more returning migrants.

Gannets

Gannets – there was a steady trickle past over the sea

It was a bit chilly standing around in the wind out on the beach so, when someone told us the Otter had been showing earlier in the main drain, we headed back for a look. It had apparently been close to the sluice but had now swum further down the channel. We could see it in the distance, diving in the green blanket weed and we had a good look at it through the scope.

The Hobbys did yet another pass, coming in low over the grazing marsh and heading off over the reedbed, much closer this time. We didn’t know which way to look – Hobbys or Otter?!

The Otter caught an eel and climbed out onto the bank. Then it slipped back into the water and started swimming towards us. It kept diving and each time it resurfaced it was much closer. We stood quietly on the sluice and waited. It came closer and closer, before it was just a few metres from us. It came through the sparse reeds along the edge of the channel and then swam out right in front of us. We could even see the Otter still had the eel in its mouth, before it dived and the trail of bubbles disappeared through the sluice right below us! Amazing.

Otter

Otter – swam through the sluice right below us

That was a great way to end the morning, and we headed round to the visitor centre for lunch, very pleased with what we had seen. After lunch, we drove back along to the Iron Road. We were a bit disappointed to see that they had just been topping the grazing meadows with a tractor, presumably causing lots of disturbance, although the tractor driver appeared to have gone off for his lunch now.

The Iron Road pool looked quite dry and deserted, so we made our way along the path towards Babcock Hide. Several Egyptian Geese had already moved back in to the recently cut grass.

Black-tailed Godwit

Black-tailed Godwit – a juvenile from Iceland

When we got to the hide and opened the flaps, we could see lots of waders in the water just in front. Most of them appeared to be Common Redshanks but there were a couple of juvenile Black-tailed Godwits too, which had come here from Iceland where they had been raised over the summer.

There were 26 Common Redshanks together in the flock but with them was one bird which looked subtly different. It was a touch darker grey, more brightly spotted on the wings, with bright white above the lores meeting over the bill and a slightly longer and finer bill. It was another juvenile Spotted Redshank.

It was really good to see the two species side by side, particularly watching their subtly different feeding actions, the Spotted Redshank sweeping its bill more quickly and vigorously from side to side through the shallow water.

Spotted Redshank

Spotted Redshank & Common Redshanks – spot the odd one out!

As we made our way back towards the road, along the track from the hide, we happened to glimpse something dropping down by the cattle gates at the top. It could have been anything and was almost certainly nothing interesting, but just the way it flew triggered some unconscious interest. We walked up to the gates but couldn’t see anything.

The tractor had been driven away earlier and the main gate out to the road left open, so rather than walk out through the pedestrian gate at the side, we walked out towards the main road. As we did so, a bird flew out of a very small bramble just before the bridge over the ditch. It was rather pale grey-brown, probably just one of the regular House Sparrows which are often along here, but as it flew away from us down the line of the ditch it looked oddly long-tailed. As it turned and dropped into the grassy bank beside the ditch, it looked like a Wryneck.

With the group standing on the path back towards the car and one of us walking back along the road, we were hoping the bird would fly back out to the fence or one of the bramble bushes further along the ditch. But before we could all get in place, the bird took off again. It flew up several metres into the sky, circled round and headed off over the road. This time we could see it definitely was a Wryneck! Unfortunately, it flew away strongly over the field the other side and was gone.

Wryneck is a scarce visitor here, a drift migrant which only arrives if the wind is coming off the continent when it is on its way from Scandinavia down to Africa, so this was a great bird to find. And all the more so here, a totally unexpected place to see one!

With the chance that migrants were starting to arrive, we returned to the car and carried on along the coast road to Kelling. It was rather quiet as we walked along the lane towards the Water Meadow. A Chiffchaff and a Blackcap both called from somewhere in the hedge, both probably local birds rather than migrants. There was no sign of anything of interest around the copse. A little flock of Linnets was in the brambles by the Water Meadow.

Linnet

Linnet – a small flock was around the Water Meadow

When we got to the cross track and could look back at the pool, we could see lots of gulls bathing and a small group loafing in the grass on the edge. There was a nice selection – mostly Black-headed Gulls, but also a few Herring Gulls, a Lesser Black-backed Gull and a juvenile Great Black-backed Gull. There were a few ducks too, largely Teal and Shoveler, but also another lone Pintail – they are starting to return now and this is an unusual place to see one, so the two we saw today may have been fresh returnees.

We carried on along the track towards the beach, scanning the bushes and brambles to see if we could find any grounded migrants, but there was no sign of any here. A Brown Hare ran down the hillside towards us, but stopped and started to feed in the long grass. Another Brown Hare had found a sheltered spot, out of the wind, in the lee of the bushes behind the beach.

Brown Hare

Brown Hare – sheltering from the wind

As we walked along the track up the hillside just behind the beach, we scanned the sea to see if anything was passing offshore. Several Sandwich Terns flew past, presumably returning from fishing further along the coast. A fairly close-in Fulmar was also notable, but we couldn’t see anything more interesting.

There were no birds around the gun emplacements but we did eventually managed to locate a rather distant Stonechat, looking out across Weybourne Camp to the radar towers. There was still no sign of any migrants here, so we started to make our way back.

As we got back to the village, we could see four Common Buzzards over the hillside beyond, where the land rises up onto the Holt-Cromer ridge. With a north wind blowing, there was presumably quite an updraft for them today and they were hanging almost completely still, seemingly effortlessly. They were playing too, two of the swooping at each other, talon grappling. We stood for a couple of minutes watching them.

It was a lovely way to end a couple of very enjoyable days spent looking for migrants and more along the coast here.

3rd Sep 2018 – Migrants & More, Day 1

Day 1 of a two day Private Tour up on the North Norfolk coast today. It was mostly a nice, warm, sunny day, but there was some sea fret lingering offshore which was blown in on the moderate NE breeze, so it was a bit foggy on the coast for a couple of hours around the middle of the day.

We made our way west along the coast today – our first destination was at Titchwell. As we got out of the car, a tit flock was in the trees above us. We could see several Long-tailed Tits in the Sycamores, and hear a Coal Tit singing. There were also several  Chiffchaffs and Chaffinches with them, picking around for insects amongst the leaves.

Long-tailed Tit

Long-tailed Tit – in the sycamores in the car park first thing

The overflow carpark can be a good place to look for warblers at this time of year, before it gets too busy. There were already several people walking round this morning, but we still managed to find lots of birds. We stopped by a quiet corner, and scanned the brambles, elders and hawthorns laden with berries.

A couple of Reed Warblers appeared first, one of them finding a branch in the morning sun where it stopped to preen. It is always odd to see them clambering round in bushes at this time of year. Several smart silvery grey Lesser Whitethroats clambered around after the berries – they are always much easier to see at this time of year. A rusty brown Common Whitethroat came out too, followed by several Blackcaps. There was a large flock of Goldfinches and Greenfinches up in the top of the trees, and a Song Thrush appeared briefly too.

That was a great selection of birds to start our visit here and so we headed out to the reserve. As we walked out along the main path, we could hear Bearded Tits pinging in the reeds but they were a long way out and hard to see. A couple of Marsh Harriers circled over the back of the reedbed.

There was nothing of note on the dried up grazing meadow pool, which is getting rather overgrown now, but as we scanned over the reeds a Sparrowhawk flew low towards us over the bare ground. It flushed several Woodpigeons, then landed briefly out of view behind the reeds at the front, before it was off again towards the trees.

The reedbed pool held a few Common Pochard and a pair of Gadwall. A Green Sandpiper flew round calling loudly, before dropping down behind the reeds, and a Common Snipe flew over too, its raspy call alerting us to its approach. A Bearded Tit zipped across over the reeds, too quick for everyone to get onto.

We stopped in at Island Hide first, to see what was on the Freshmarsh. There were lots of birds out here today – mostly ducks and waders. There has been a Red-necked Phalarope in residence for the last few days, a bird we particularly wanted to see. Scanning carefully, we found it right at back, swimming around amongst the ducks. We could see its distinctive shape, short sharp bill and white head and neck with black bandit mask.

Ruff

Ruff – the adults now almost entirely in their non-breeding plumage

There was a great selection of other waders on here too today. The first thing we noticed on the mud in front of the hide were all the Ruff, the adults now mostly in their drab grey-brown and white non-breeding plumage. A huge mass of godwits spread across the middle of the scrape, a mixture of Black-tailed Godwits and Bar-tailed Godwits. The latter had probably come in from the beach to roost, ahead of the rising tide, and we could see several of them were still sporting the remnants of their rusty breeding plumage.

Scanning through all the godwits, we could see a few much smaller Knot and Dunlin mixed in with them. There was a single juvenile Curlew Sandpiper too. When it was asleep, its clean white belly and brighter supercilium set it apart from the Dunlin nearby. When it woke up, we could see its longer, more downcurved bill.

A single Spotted Redshank was lurking in the deeper water right at the back, against the reeds. We could hear a Greenshank calling and looked across the scrape to see three land briefly on the edge of one of the islands. There are still quiet a few Avocets here too, and a Ringed Plover appeared briefly on the mud. A large flock of Golden Plover circled over and dropped down onto the islands. Every so often, all the waders would take off and whirl round as a Marsh Harrier drifted high over the scrape.

Spoonbills 2

Spoonbill – the last of the 21 to arrive

The tide was obviously rising now out on the saltmarsh, as the Spoonbills started to appear, flying in from where they had been feeding. First a pair landed out on the Freshmarsh, an adult pursued by its offspring, demanding to be fed – the ‘little beggar’. This was followed almost immediately by another big group of eighteen. Another loner arrived shortly afterwards, taking us to 21 Spoonbills in total. They landed out in the middle of the Freshmarsh at first, but were quickly spooked by a passing Marsh Harrier and disappeared round the back of Avocet Island out of view.

As we made our way round to Parrinder Hide next, we could already see patches of sea fret in the distance beyond. As we sat in the hide, the fog started to blow in over the Freshmarsh. It was rather eerie, looking at all the birds shrouded in fog.

Fog

Waders in the fog – from Parrinder Hide

Despite the fog, we could still see quite a few birds from the hide. Two Pink-footed Geese were feeding just in front with a single Greylag. The Pink-footed Geese are both birds which have been here all summer, unable to migrate back to Iceland for the summer due to broken wings.

A couple of Snipe were feeding on the edge of the fenced-off island, probing their beaks vigorously into the mud. A Common Sandpiper finished bathing in edge of water, and walked up onto the stony edge of the island to preen.

Given the fog, we were not sure whether or not it would be worth walking out to the beach. At least the fog did seem to be coming and going. As we looked out from the other side of Parrinder Hide, the visibility seemed to improve a bit. The tide was fairly high now, and much of the Volunteer Marsh was under water. We could see a couple of small groups of Curlew roosting in the taller vegetation and one Curlew feeding just below the hide. Several Common Redshanks and three Little Egrets were out on the mud.

Curlew

Curlew – feeding on the Volunteer Marsh

We decided to continue on, out to the Tidal Pools first. At the back of the pool just beyond the bank, we could see lots more Common Redshanks, with two Greenshanks asleep nearby. Further on, more waders were roosting on the larger island over high tide. We could see lots of Oystercatchers, and a long line of Turnstones, some still in the remains of their brighter summer plumage. There were several Grey Plover too, most of them still in breeding plumage too – we could see their black faces despite them being asleep and facing away from us, into the wind.

There were still wisps of fog blowing in, as we made it to the beach. We looked up to see a Grey Heron flying high in off the sea. It circled over the back of the beach, presumably a migrants coming in from the continent. There were a few Sandwich Terns feeding just offshore, and a little party of Sanderlings on the edge of the sea, with a Turnstone and a Dunlin for company.

Sanderling

Sanderling – one of a small party feeding along the shoreline

As we started to walk back, two juvenile Common Terns circled over the Tidal Pools. We stopped again at the Freshmarsh for a quick scan, as another small flock of Dunlin dropped in out on the mud. But we were then told that there were two Garganey and a Great White Egret round on Patsy’s Reedbed, so we decided to head round there quickly first, before lunch.

As we made our way round via Meadow Trail, we could hear a Cetti’s Warbler sub-singing in the trees by the dragonfly pool – good to hear, as we lost so many of them in the cold winter weather earlier in the year. Otherwise, the trees were quiet, so we made our way quickly round to Patsy’s.

When we arrived at Patsy’s, the first thing we saw was the Great White Egret. It was hard to miss, a large white bird as big as a heron with a long, dagger-shaped yellow bill! We had a good look at it through the scope, stalking slowly through the shallows at the back. It had earlier been seen on the saltmarsh at Thornham Point, and then flying off over towards Brancaster, so it had presumably come in to here to feed over high tide.

Great White Egret

Great White Egret – on Patsy’s Reedbed

There was a great selection of ducks on Patsy’s too today. As well as the usual Mallard, Gadwall, Shoveler and Teal, there were a few Wigeon. One of the Garganey was busily upending at the back, but we occasionally got a look at its strongly marked face pattern. There were several Common Pochard and a single Tufted Duck too, and two female Red-crested Pochard eventually emerged from the reeds.

We could hear Bearded Tits calling periodically and eventually spotted a male working its way slowly round the base of the reeds along the back edge of the pool. We got it in the scope, and could see its powder blue/grey head and black moustaches.

Then it was time to head back to the picnic area for a late lunch. While we were eating, we heard news that a Pied Flycatcher had been seen over at Holme, so after lunch we decided to head over there to see if we could find any migrants.

There were several butterflies out on the seawall in the afternoon sunshine – Common Blue, Small Copper, Small Heath. A big group of Swallows were hawking for insects low over the saltmarsh beyond, feeding up before heading off south to Africa for the winter.

We headed round to check out the paddocks first, to see what we could find. A Chiffchaff calling loudly and incessantly from the pines by the first house was potentially a good sign, but after that it was quiet apart from lots of House Sparrows in the brambles.

A small dove flew across the paddocks behind us and we turned to see it was short-tailed and flashed a white belly as it banked. It was a Turtle Dove. It flew out across the saltmarsh and dropped down into the low dunes just behind the beach. A nice bonus!

A little further on, we heard Long-tailed Tits calling and found a flock feeding in some bushes by the path. As well as the Long-tailed Tits, there were Blue Tits and several warblers – at least three Lesser Whitethroats, two Common Whitethroats, a Blackcap and a few Chiffchaffs. As they disappeared out across the paddocks, we got a good look at the silvery grey Lesser Whitethroats in particular.

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff – there were several warblers with the tit flock in the paddocks

The Pied Flycatcher had been seen earlier round by the entrance track, so we headed over and checked out the trees. We found the same tit flock again, the other side of the paddocks, but there was no sign of anything else. Presumably the flycatcher was a fresh arrival and had moved on in search of somewhere better to feed.

We were then told there were some Whinchats in the dunes, so we continued along the coastal path towards the reserve. A Whimbrel flew past calling, high over the beach somewhere, but we couldn’t see it from where we were. Eight Spoonbills flew past too, easier to see than the Whimbrel, possibly birds from the flock we had seen earlier at Titchwell, now heading out to feed on the falling tide.

Spoonbills 3

Spoonbills – these eight flew over us at Holme

When we arrived in the dunes, there was no sign of the Whinchats at first – it seemed rather quiet. But searching carefully, we came across a couple of Common Whitethroats and then found three juvenile Stonechats. We figured the Whinchats must surely not be far away and, scanning the tops of the bushes, we found at least two perched up. We had a good look at them through the scope – buffier and more orangey than the darker, rusty Stonechats and with a much more obvious pale supercilium.

We might have set off into the dunes for a closer look, but with one of the group still recovering from a broken ankle, we decided to save our energy for tomorrow. Hopefully it will be another exciting day!