Monthly Archives: August 2017

25th Aug 2017 – Summer Spectacular

A Wader Spectacular tour today. It was a lovely sunny summer’s day, warm with light winds – perfect weather. It was an early start, to get up to the Wash in good time before the tide came in, but it was worth it!

As we arrived up on the seawall, there was still plenty of exposed mud out on the Wash. It was quite a vista – a vast slick of birds was spread across the surface, shining bright in the morning sun.

6O0A6529The Wash – with a vast slick of waders in the morning sun

We stopped to watch the birds for a while. The tide was coming in very quickly, and periodically large groups of Knot would fly up ahead of the rising water and land again further up the mud. Just beyond them, the Oystercatchers were walking more methodically away from the tide.

Down at the front, on the nearside of the channel, flocks of smaller waders kept flying in and landing briefly, while others were trying to sleep, Ringed Plover, Dunlin, Sanderling and Turnstone. A lone Knot, a juvenile, was feeding down on the edge of the mud just below the path, giving us a great opportunity to look at one up close, rather than being mesmerised by the thousands further out on the mud.

6O0A6553Ringed Plover & Dunlin – trying to sleep ahead of the rising tide

Very quickly, the mud in front of where we were standing was covered by the tide, so we made our way further along the seawall. Here we stopped again to take a closer look at the vast flocks of waders. Through the scope, we could see that the Knot were a mixture of colours, many in grey non-breeding or juvenile plumage but a few still in orange breeding plumage.

There were lots of Bar-tailed Godwits too, some of those in rusty summer plumage still, with the red colour extending right down under the tail. A single Black-tailed Godwit down at the front was already in grey winter plumage. A lone Grey Plover appeared, also already in grey non-breeding plumage. There were birds other than waders too. A small group of terns had gathered on the mud ahead of the rising tide, a mixture of Common and Sandwich Terns. A raft of Shelduck was bobbing around on the water.

Then something spooked the Knot and they all took off, thousands upon thousands of them in the air at once. They swirled round, flashing white and dark as they twisted and turned, like a huge wave. It was mesmerising to watch.

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6O0A6574Knot – thousands twisting and turning

Eventually the Knot calmed down and started to land again, back down on the mud. As the birds above hung in the air waiting for a landing slot, the sky went dark with a thick cloud of birds.

6O0A6578Knot – the vast flock landing again on the mud

Some of the waders leave the Wash early, not waiting for the tide to come right in. The Common Redshanks started to fly past us in small groups. A sharpt ‘tchuit’ call alerted us to a Spotted Redshank which came in off the mud and past us in with them. Some small flocks of Dunlin also flew in over the seawall and dropped down to the pit beyond.

We walked further along, down to the corner where the waders were starting to gather in the last mud to be covered by the tide. On the way, a Common Whitethroat was singing in the brambles on the seawall and flicked off ahead of us. A Yellow Wagtail flew over our heads, calling.

6O0A6598Waders – increasingly concentrated into the last corner of mud

As the water continued to rise quickly, the area of exposed mud progressively shrank and the waders were increasingly concentrated into the last corner. The Oystercatchers started to give up the fight against the tide and peeled off in lines, flying past us piping before circling round and dropping down to the banks of the pit behind us.

We could see that many of the Oystercatchers were moulting, with gaps in their wings visible as they flew over our heads. Many waders come to the Wash to moult at this time of year, feeling safer out on a vast muddy estuary in big flocks, and with plenty of food to fuel the growth of the new feathers.

6O0A6588Oystercatchers – the first to leave as the tide covered the remaining mud

Finally the Knot started to take off too. They came in several waves today, each tens of thousands of birds strong. As each wave flew in and over our heads, all we could hear was the simultaneous beating of thousands of pairs of wings. An amazing experience.

We watched as the Knot circled over the pits behind us. They couldn’t all land at once, so they split into smaller groups, some swirling high overhead, others flying back out towards the Wash.

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6O0A6606Knot – finally taking off in vast waves & flying in to roost

Once most of the Knot had left the mud, we turned to walk to Shore Hide. A Common Sandpiper flew past over the water, calling, flicking its bowed wings, and disappeared up along the channel higher into the saltmarsh.

In the hide, the birds were very nervous. The waders normally don’t like the island directly in front of the hide, but the next one over is normally packed with Knot. There were fewer waders on here today. A large group of Knot and Dunlin were shuffling around on one half of it but they were very jumpy, repeatedly taking off and flying round before landing again. Some bigger groups of Knot were packed tightly into a couple of islands further over.

6O0A6633Knot, Dunlin & Redshank – shuffling nervously on one of the islands

Pretty soon, we realised why the birds were so nervous. Suddenly all the waders erupted from the islands and started to swirl backwards and forwards over the pit. A young Peregrine appeared amongst them. It took a couple of half-hearted stoops at a wader separated from the flock, a Dunlin managed to evade it by swooping down low over the water and the Peregrine pulled up sharply.

The Peregrine was inexperienced and had lost the element of surprise. A Common Tern started to chase after it. So the Peregrine flew straight towards us and over the hide, disappearing behind and back out to the Wash to try its luck out there. The waders settled down again, but were still noticeably nervous.

Many of the terns  had settled back on the island right in front of the hide. They were mostly Common Terns, probably birds which have bred here, and there were several juveniles still. A couple of adults flew in with fish, but they didn’t always find the youngster they presumably planned to give it to. In with the Common Terns was a much smaller juvenile Little Tern. On the next island over, there were more Little Terns here too, several juveniles a yellow-billed adult.

6O0A6644Little Tern – a juvenile in with the Common Terns

The Common Redshank were mainly over on the far bank. A smaller group of about twenty or so birds was asleep in the middle of the pit, with the Greylag Geese and Cormorants. Through the scope, we could see they were a mixture of duller, greyer Common Redshanks and paler Spotted Redshanks.

We made our way round to the viewing screen at the southern end of the pit next. On our way there, we could see lots of Knot still circling out over the Wash, possibly disturbed by the Peregrine. The tide was still high and there was no exposed mud, but perhaps some of them had chosen to try to roost with some of the larger waders out on the saltmarsh today.

From down at the viewing screen, we could see there were fewer smaller waders at this end of the pit today. There were lots of Oystercatchers, with a single Avocet in with them, plus quite a few Black-tailed Godwits roosting here. Some geese flew in over the bank and landed on the water, with several Canada Geese amongst the Greylags. A couple of Egyptian Geese were sleeping on the bank. A family of Moorhen walked around the gravel bank along the edge to one side of the hide.

6O0A6646Oystercatchers – roosting at the southern end of the pit

By now, it was already a good time after high tide, so we walked back out to look at the Wash again. The water was already receding, and there was lots of exposed mud. Quite a few waders were already out there, but they were still very jumpy. When they all flew up, we could see a Peregrine flying across behind them, carrying something in talons. It had clearly been more successful out here then over the pit earlier. A young Marsh Harrier set off after it, clearly with one eye on its prey, but the Peregrine seemed unperturbed and continued away across the saltmarsh.

It was a lovely warm morning and there was quite a bit of raptor activity here today. A Common Buzzard circled up over the mud, chased by a Kestrel. Over across the other side of the saltmarsh, by the seawall, a Marsh Harrier was tussling with a Red Kite, the latter circling lazily and avoiding the Marsh Harrier effortlessly.

A Common Sandpiper flew past again, along the channel in front of us, and a Greenshank flew the other way, calling. The rest of the waders were very slow coming off the pits today. As we stood here for a few minutes, several lines of Oystercatchers flew past and landed back out on the mud, and a few small groups of Dunlin flew out to join them. Time was getting on now, so we decided to make our way back to the car.

We headed round to Titchwell next. The overflow car park was busy today, perhaps not a great surprise given the lovely weather. After our early start, it was time for an early lunch. As we sat eating in the picnic area, a Chiffchaff was calling in the sallows. A couple of Common Darters were basking on one of the benches and several Migrants Hawkers and Speckled Woods were flying around in the sunshine.

6O0A6656Common Darter – basking on a bench in the picnic area

After lunch, we headed out to explore the reserve. We had a quick look at the feeders by the visitor centre, which held a nice selection of finches and tits. Out along the main path, a Blackcap was calling in the bushes down in the ditch.

As we passed the Thornham grazing marsh, we heard a Bearded Tit calling in the reeds, but despite waiting for a minute or so, it didn’t show itself. The reedbed pool was quiet, but as we scanned over the reeds, we spotted a group of Spoonbills flying up from the back of the freshmarsh beyond. We could see their long outstretched necks as they flew, their bills held straight out in front. They flew towards us, eight of them, before three peeled off and headed out over the saltmarsh towards Thornham Harbour and the other five circled round and dropped back onto the freshmarsh.

6O0A6673Spoonbills – five of the eight which flew up from the freshmarsh

There were plenty of waders out on the freshmarsh from Island Hide. Several Ruff were feeding on the mud right in front of the hide, a mixture of tawny-brown juveniles and grey/white adults now in non-breeding plumage. A juvenile female (traditionally called a Reeve) was much smaller than the juvenile males around it. Further over we could see lots of Avocet and Black-tailed Godwits, some of the latter still sporting the remnants of their rusty orange summer plumage.

6O0A6727Ruff – a tawny brown juvenile

Looking more carefully around the islands, we found a Common Sandpiper feeding along the edge of the mud, running along, bobbing up and down. Two Ringed Plover were feeding on the same island, close by. Over towards the main bank, a smaller juvenile Little Ringed Plover was bathing. A Common Snipe was feeding on the edge of the reeds, probing its long bill deep into the wet mud.

When we heard a Greenshank calling, we looked across to see it flying in over the main bank. It flew towards us and dropped in on the edge of the mud in front of the hide briefly. It helpfully stayed just long enough for us to have a good look at it, then flew off again calling.

6O0A6687Greenshank – dropped down on the edge of the mud briefly

The ducks are all in dull brown eclipse plumage at the moment. There are quite a few Teal back here now and we did see a couple of Shoveler too.

Bearded Tit was a particular request for the day, but at first all we had was the occasional ‘pinging’ call coming from the reeds. Each time we heard them, we looked over and eventually found a single Bearded Tit working its way low down along the edge of the reeds. We got it in the scope, but it was a little distant. Then two more Bearded Tits called from the reeds just across from the hide and we managed to get good views of these in the scope as they hopped around just beyond the edge of the mud.

With the Bearded Tits in the bag, we made our way round to Parrinder Hide. There had been a male Grey-headed Wagtail here for the last couple of days, the northern Scandinavian race of Yellow Wagtail, but we were told it could be elusive. There were lots of wagtails out on the islands, plenty of Pied Wagtails and at least four regular Yellow Wagtails, but no sign of the one we were looking for.

We decided to continue out to the beach. As we walked along the path beside the Volunteer Marsh, a Black-tailed Godwit was feeding on the edge of the channel below us, giving great views. We stopped briefly to scan the channel at the far end and found a couple of Grey Plover feeding on the mud, looking stunning still in breeding plumage, with jet black faces and bellies.

6O0A6738Black-tailed Godwit – feeding on the Volunteer Marsh by the main path

The beach was very busy today. Several people were out on the mussel beds and two dogs were running around on there too, so there were comparatively fewer waders than usual. There were still plenty of Oystercatchers and a few Curlew, plus a couple of little groups of Turnstone.

There was not much to see out to sea today either. A quick scan produced two Great Crested Grebes out on the water. So we decided to start walking back.

When we got back to the freshmarsh, we stopped for another scan. Looking over at the island in front of Parrinder Hide, we could still see loads of wagtails in the vegetation. As we scanned across a dark slate-grey head appeared in the leaves, followed by a bright yellow throat and breast – the Grey-headed Wagtail!

It was hard to see, as it was running around and kept disappearing into the low vegetation on the island, but eventually everyone got a really good look at the Grey-headed Wagtail. A striking bird. The Little Ringed Plover we had seen earlier was also showing very well now, on the mud just below the path..

6O0A6740Little Ringed Plover – a juvenile, feeding on the mud below the main path

It was hot and sunny now, so it was nice to get back to the shade of the trees. Unfortunately, it was time to call it a day and head back to the car. We didn’t have time to explore the whole reserve today, after our busy morning up on the Wash, but we had seen a few nice birds. It had been a stunning spectacle today, a morning well spent and well worth the early start!

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22nd Aug 2017 – Late Summer Birding

A Private Tour today for a visitor from India, so we went out looking for all the commoner species, as well as some of the more unusual ones. It was bright in the morning, even sunny at times, before clouding over a bit more in the afternoon, but thankfully it stayed dry all day.

The plan was to spend part of the day at Titchwell, but on our way there we turned inland to look for some farmland species first. We stopped at the start of a footpath, lined with overgrown hedges and brambles. As we got out of the car, we flushed a covey of Red-legged Partridges from the edge of the field. A Common Buzzard was calling and we looked over the fields to see one circling up out of the trees in the distance.

As we walked along the footpath, we could hear a Common Whitethroat and it flicked away ahead of us a couple of times before diving back into cover. A Yellowhammer was perched in the top of the hedge, but silhouetted against the sky and it dropped down out of view as we approached. Thankfully when we returned to the car, a smart yellow-headed male Yellowhammer had appeared in the top of the hedge right by the road. A Reed Bunting sat up nicely here for us too.

A little further along the road, a Eurasian Curlew flew past us as we drove along. We were just talking about how you can find large flocks feeding in the fields here when we passed the next hedge and found about twenty Curlew in a stubble field. Some smaller birds were running around just beyond them, very hard to see at first in the tall stubble. We stopped and wound down the windows for a better look and confirmed they were Eurasian Golden Plover. Some were still sporting the remains to their black summer underparts, to a greater or lesser extent.

Golden PloversGolden Plovers – very well camouflaged in the stubble

Carrying on towards Choseley, another Common Buzzard took off from a telegraph post by the road and glided away effortlessly ahead of us, while we stopped to look through a large flock of Black-headed Gulls and Herring Gulls. There were several (Northern) Lapwing in the field too. A little further on and  a family of Grey Partridge hopped out of the grassy verge and ran along the road ahead of us. Despite being only half grown, the youngsters had no problem flying over the hedge eventually.

A weedy strip along the edge of a field held a nice flock of finches, which flew up and landed on the wires so we could look through them. They were mostly Linnets, lots of brown, streaky females and juveniles, but with a few males still sporting their red breasts from the summer. There were several Goldfinches and a couple of Greenfinches with them too. Up at the drying barns there was quite a bit of disturbance – tractors, combine harvester and birdwatchers! – so we didn’t linger here and made our way on, down to Titchwell. Approaching the reserve, a few Common Swifts were hawking for insects over the fields beside the road.

As we got out of the car, we could hear Long-tailed Tits calling in the trees by the car park. We walked over for a closer look and found a mixed flock, with Blue Tits and Great Tits and a couple of Chiffchaffs in with them too. The first cars were starting to use the overflow car park, so it was not as quiet as it might have been, but we did still manage to see a couple of Blackcaps as they flew out of the brambles where they had been feeding. The Wood Pigeons were showing well around the car park as usual and were duly admired today – they are much harder to see in India apparently! A Great Spotted Woodpecker flew over calling.

Long-tailed TitLong-tailed Tit – a mixed flock was feeding in the car park

The feeders by the visitor centre produced a few more common birds for the day’s list – a male Chaffinch hopped around under the bird table and a pair of Dunnocks few under the feeders. The resident Robins here were unusually reticent to come and perform today, although we did see one in the trees (they are usually hopping around under the picnic tables!). A Grey Squirrel on the feeders the other side of the visitor centre was also a source of interest.

As we walked out onto the reserve, a Wall butterfly was basking in the sunshine on one of the signs on the sea wall. We heard a Bearded Reedling (aka Bearded Tit!) calling from the reeds by the Thornham grazing marsh ‘pool’, but despite waiting here for a couple of minutes, it didn’t show itself. A Marsh Harrier flapped up out of the reeds at the back before dropping back down and a Little Egret flew up from the other side of the reeds at the front and disappeared over the path behind us.

WallWall – basking on one of the signs on the sea wall

Other than a couple of Little Grebes, there were just a few Mallard on the reedbed pool, so we continued on towards Island Hide. Just before we got there, we stopped to listen to more Bearded Reedlings calling. Unfortunately one flew up out of the reeds just as we were looking in different directions and dropped in again too quickly for us both to get to see it. We decided we might have a better chance of seeing one on the edge of the reeds from the hide, so we continued on to there.

A few Common Teal were feeding on the mud right in front of the hide. Numbers are gradually increasing now, as they return here for the winter. Ducks in general are not looking their best at the moment, with all the drakes in drab eclipse plumage. The adult Shelduck have all left the UK and gone over to the Wadden See to moult, leaving behind all the duller juveniles, one of which was also dabbling in the mud by the hide.

ShelduckShelduck – a juvenile feeding on the mud in front of the hide

There were a few waders close to the hide too. At first, there were several Ruff here, the males already in winter plumage, having quickly lost their breeding plumage on their return. A Lapwing was a little further back on the edge of the mud too. We stopped a while to get some photographs of the various birds here.

RuffRuff – a winter plumage male in front of the hide

There are usually a few Avocets in front of the hide here and this is generally a good place to get photographs of them. At first today they were all much further over, but eventually our patience was rewarded when one came in and started feeding right in front of us, sweeping its bill from side to side across the surface of the wet mud.

AvocetAvocet – one eventually performed for us in front of the hide

There were other waders here, further out on the freshmarsh. Through the scope, we could see a good number of Black-tailed Godwits. A little group of Dunlin were feeding on the exposed mud along the edge of the reedbed, mostly streaky-bellied juveniles but a single adult was still sporting a solid black belly patch.

Four Spoonbills over the back of the freshmarsh were all asleep, but we eventually found a Bearded Reedling on the edge of the reeds, working its way along just above the mud, weaving in and out. We had a good view of it in the scope.

After our very productive photography session in Island Hide, we made our way round to Parrinder Hide next. We quickly located the two Common Snipe which we had been told were feeding by the fence on the edge of Avocet Island. A couple of the Spoonbills had woken up now, so we got a look at them through the scope before they went back to sleep.

A Meadow Pipit dropped in to bathe on the edge of the water just along from the hide. A careful scan through the Pied Wagtails feeding out on the islands produced a couple of Yellow Wagtails in with them.

The Volunteer Marsh looked quiet at first, but as we walked out towards the beach, we could see quite a few waders feeding along the banks of the channel at the far end. There were several Common Redshanks and Black-tailed Godwits and half hidden down in the channel we managed to find a single Grey Plover, well camouflaged with its back to us against a background of grey mud. It was still mostly in summer plumage and, when it turned, we could see its black face.

Out at the beach, the tide was out. We walked down to the mussel beds to look through the waders. As well as lots of very noisy Oystercatchers, we could see quite a few Bar-tailed Godwits, with a couple of them still in bright rusty summer plumage. There were several Curlews and (Ruddy) Turnstones too. A juvenile Spoonbill out here on the mussel beds looked distinctly out of place!

Scanning along the beach, we found a couple of Sanderling running around on the sand in amongst the gulls, which included a few Great Black-backed Gulls for the day. In the distance, a line of (Great) Cormorants were drying their wings out at Thornham Point. A lone Fulmar circled overhead on stiff wings and made its way west along the shoreline, before a couple of distant Sandwich Terns flew past offshore and two adult Gannets flew back the other way a little bit closer in.

TurnstoneTurnstone – feeding along the high tide line

At the top of the beach, we stopped to watch a couple of Turnstones feeding along the high tide line. They were not turning stones today, but pulling and shaking at the dry seaweed to try to dislodge any invertebrates. A Whimbrel called from somewhere out to sea, but then went quiet.

We stopped briefly to talk to a couple of local birders scanning the sea and they kindly pointed us in the direction of a Common Scoter out on the water. It drifted across and was joined by a second. A couple of Great Crested Grebes were out on the sea too.

Black-tailed GodwitBlack-tailed Godwit – a bright juvenile of the islandica subspecies

It was time for lunch now so we made our way quickly back. As we got to the freshmarsh, we could hear a Greenshank calling but didn’t see where it landed. A couple of juvenile Black-tailed Godwits were more obliging, feeding just below us along the edge of the reeds. Their bright rusty plumage confirmed they were of the islandica subspecies, which means they had just been born and raised in Iceland over the summer.

The Spoonbills commute in and out from the saltmarsh to feed and which we were walking back a couple of them flew back in, straight past us standing on the bank, giving us much closer views.

SpoonbillSpoonbill – flying back in from feeding out on the saltmarsh

On the walk back, a Cetti’s Warbler sang from the reeds briefly as we walked back but remained typically well hidden down in the vegetation. We heard a Common Sandpiper calling from the reedbed pool, but it remained out of sight, probably feeding around the muddy edges behind the reeds.

Then it was back for lunch in the picnic area, where one of the local Robins was a little more obliging than earlier in the day. A couple of Migrant Hawker dragonflies were hawking around the willows here too and a single Common Darter stopped to bask on one of the benches.

After lunch, a couple of Bullfinch were calling in the trees by the car park but went quiet before we got a chance to track them down. A quick visit to use the facilities revealed a nice selection of moths and other insects on the walls in the toilet block. They are attracted by the lights which are left on here overnight. A quick look at the moths revealed a Light Emerald, a Snout and a couple of Brimstone, accompanied by a Speckled Bush-cricket!

Light EmeraldLight Emerald moth – on the wall in the toilet block

For the first part of the afternoon, we wanted to explore the rest of Titchwell, Fen Trail and round to the Autumn Trail which is open at this time of year. A Jay was in the sallows along Fen Trail, hopping around above our heads, but otherwise the trees were rather quiet.

The surprise find along here was a Willow Emerald damselfly (also known as Western Willow Spreadwing) which was perched on the vegetation by the path. This species is a very recent colonist in the UK, from about 2007 in Norfolk, and has only started to occur in North Norfolk with any regularity in the last few years. Apparently there are still only a very few records from Titchwell!

Willow EmeraldWillow Emerald damselfly – still a rare species at Titchwell

The water levels on Patsy’s Reedbed are high now, so there were quite a few ducks out on the pool. They were mostly Gadwall and Mallard, but we also managed to find a single Tufted Duck and a couple of Common Pochard to add to the day’s tally. A careful scan around the edge of the reeds produced a Reed Warbler feeding low down at the water’s edge, before it or another flew up and started flycatching in the sallows in front of the viewing screen.

Stopping to look at a flock of finches in the dead trees by the paddocks, we noticed a couple of smaller birds chasing each other in and out of the hedge, two Lesser Whitethroats. Eventually they gave up chasing each other and one flew in and landed in the hedge much closer to us, before feeding on the blackberries, where we could get a good look at it.

Round at the end of Autumn Trail, we stopped to look out over the back of the freshmarsh. A single winter plumage Spotted Redshank was asleep over towards the Avocet Island fence, but there was no sign now of the Greenshank which had apparently been here earlier.

A careful scan along the edge of the reeds revealed a Water Rail picking its way across the mud, in and out of the vegetation. There were a couple of volunteers here who had just finished erecting some fence posts nearby and the Water Rail disappeared back into the reeds when they came over to try to see it. As soon as they left, it walked out into a gap in the reeds and stood preening for several minutes, so we could get a good look at it in the scope. Typical!

As we walked up to here, we had heard the distinctive ‘pinging’ call of Bearded Reedlings and we had had a quick glimpse of one as it flew up from the edge of the cut reed. When we heard more pinging calls just across the mud in front of us, we up to see two juvenile Bearded Reedlings perched in the top of the reeds just above the Water Rail. We didn’t know where to look! We had a great view of them through the scope.

Bearded TitBearded Reedling / Tit – perched up nicely in the reeds at the end of Autumn Trail

As we started to walk back, many of the Black-headed Gulls which had earlier been loafing on the freshmarsh were now hawking for insects, probably flying ants, over the reedbed. A smaller, dark shape dropped sharply out of the throng, a Hobby. It set off briefly after a Starling which was flying below, before giving up and flying back up into the mass of gulls where it also appeared to be catching insects.

We had planned to spend the rest of the afternoon at Holkham, so we made our way back to the car and headed back east along the coast road. When we got to Lady Anne’s Drive we discovered that it was closed. ‘For operational reasons’ was the only explanation we could get from the parking attendant at the gate, despite the fact that there were still plenty of cars parked along the drive and the horse box and taxi in front of us were allowed in. They seem to be making an annoying habit of closing Lady Anne’s Drive at the moment!

A quick change of plan, and we made our way over to Wells beach car park instead,  in the hope of picking up some woodland birds in the pines. As we had hoped, at this time of day the car parks were already emptying and there were plenty of spaces. We walked in through the gates and past the boating lake, along the main path on the edge of the trees. It was fairly quiet at first here. The highlight was a juvenile Marsh Harrier hunting out over Quarles marsh. It was wearing a couple of bright green wing tags but was unfortunately too far off to read the codes.

We headed for the drinking pool in the hope we might be able to intersect with a tit flock and were almost there when we ran into a large flock of birds coming in the opposite direction. We heard the Long-tailed Tits coming first and quickly found ourselves surrounded by birds. There were lots of Coal Tits in the tops of the pines, so we got a good look at those first. There were good numbers of Blue Tits and Great Tits with them too.

When we heard a Treecreeper calling, we looked across to see one climbing up the trunk of a tree. It disappeared back onto another tree, before reappearing chased by a second Treecreeper and the two of them followed each other up another trunk. Then a Great Spotted Woodpecker appeared in the top of the pines above them. As the tit flock moved on back through the trees alongside the path, we followed them. As they crossed the path, we found a few Goldcrests in the flock too and with patience we got good views of them lower down in the trees.

When the flock moved further into the trees, we left them to it and walked on to the drinking pool. Perhaps not surprisingly, with all the birds heading in the opposite direction, it was quiet here now, so we went back and quickly picked up the tit flock again. It seemed to be heading out into a more open area now, so we followed. Some of the birds flew out into the scattered bushes in the open, while others were reluctant to follow, remaining in the birches. The flock seemed to stop here for a few minutes, unsure which way it was going, which gave us another chance to look through it.

A small lemon-yellow breasted bird appeared in the top of the birches with the tits, a juvenile Willow Warbler, perhaps bred locally or possibly a migrant on its way south already. Unfortunately, it was very hard to get onto in the birches, flitting around constantly and only showing itself briefly a few times. As the flock finally made up its collective mind and then turned to head back into the trees, we picked up three Blackcaps which flew out of the bushes behind the rest of the birds.

It was time to make our way back to the car now, but at least our mission here had been successful in adding some woodland birds to the list. A Jay flew out and hopped around on the path in front of us on the way,

JayJay – flew out onto the path on our walk back

It had been a very successful day with an excellent variety of birds seen, and several different butterflies, moths and dragonflies too. A great introduction to birding in the UK!